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James C

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I'm looking to try and learn to square and thickness my oak boards by hand.

I've almost got my Wadkin Planar Thicknesser up and running true, just need to finish adjusting the rollers in the thicknesser table.

I want to try and build up my hand skills and was wondering for flattening and thicknessing what is a good plane to use a No6, No7 or No8?
 

condeesteso

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I think you will get a lot of feedback on this question... but personally I find a 7 as big as you really need. I only have 2 in this range - a Lie 7 1/2 which is excellent but pricey, and an old Record no6 (mine happens to be the 'SS' with 2 part cap, but let's not re-open the debate on that issue #-o ). The Record cost me about £50 on ebay and has the older crucible cast laminated blade, which I think is excellent.
I have just used the Record to flatten an ash bench-top so mine has a camber on the blade, but it is a very capable jointer also.
So for practicality, quality and value, I recommend an old Record - 6 or 7. They almost always need a tune but as they are very well made to start, tuning is easy and even if you buy a new premium plane you still need to be able to sharpen it and sometimes even tune it too!
 

Jacob

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Anything bigger than 5 1/2 is hard work. 5 1/2 is yer standard jack plane ideal for what you describe, but a 5 might suit even better, especially on hardwoods. The bigger planes are for "jointing" really, i.e. getting a very straight edge or surface on an already planed up workpiece.
Good quality old no.5s are dirt cheap.
There is a bit of a myth around the 7 as Alan Peters claimed to use it extensively. But you don't have to follow fashions!
 

bugbear

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James C":3hfne1e7 said:
I'm looking to try and learn to square and thickness my oak boards by hand.

I've almost got my Wadkin Planar Thicknesser up and running true, just need to finish adjusting the rollers in the thicknesser table.

I want to try and build up my hand skills and was wondering for flattening and thicknessing what is a good plane to use a No6, No7 or No8?
I wouldn't go longer (and heavier) than a #6 for surface prep, unless I was aiming for very high accuracy (Kirby-esque bench top, for instance).

Jointing is a different matter.

BugBear
 

woodbloke

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Jacob":1zf806ce said:
There is a bit of a myth around the 7 as Alan Peters claimed to use it extensively.
No myth...if you read his book he states the case explicitly - Rob
 

Jacob

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woodbloke":8x1l0juv said:
Jacob":8x1l0juv said:
There is a bit of a myth around the 7 as Alan Peters claimed to use it extensively.
No myth...if you read his book he states the case explicitly - Rob
Yes I know.
What I meant was that he has given the no 7 mythical status.
As a result a lot of hand-toolies are struggling away with great heavy planes much too big for the work in hand! :lol:

NB a lot to be said for just sticking to a no 4.
 

mickthetree

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I have record 5 1/2, 6, 7 & 8 planes. They all have their place, but actually for hard graft and hogging I reach for a wooden jack plane now. It takes material off very fast and as it weighs a fraction of its steel counterparts.

If you are flattening and thicknessing boards by hand you will soon realise how tiring it can be and a lighter plane will enable you to cary on longer.

You can pick one up at a car boot, flea market, ebay for £10 or thereabouts. There are so many about that you will be able to find a good one and typically they all have good steel.

Once you are down to rough dimensions you can turn to the steel jobbies to finish the job.

This is what works for me anyway.

HTH
 

Jacob

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mickthetree":kc4ue4p8 said:
I have record 5 1/2, 6, 7 & 8 planes. They all have their place, but actually for hard graft and hogging I reach for a wooden jack plane now. It takes material off very fast and as it weighs a fraction of its steel counterparts.

If you are flattening and thicknessing boards by hand you will soon realise how tiring it can be and a lighter plane will enable you to cary on longer.

You can pick one up at a car boot, flea market, ebay for £10 or thereabouts. There are so many about that you will be able to find a good one and typically they all have good steel.

Once you are down to rough dimensions you can turn to the steel jobbies to finish the job.

This is what works for me anyway.

HTH
+1 for the idea at least - I haven't spent as much time with woodies as I would like. The more physical work you do the more the light weight becomes important.
Planing all day with a 7 and you'd be knackered, unless you are superman.
 

Paul Chapman

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Jacob":34l3zdr6 said:
[Planing all day with a 7 and you'd be knackered, unless you are superman.
Bit of a myth that a #7 is hard work to use. Most of the weight is taken by the bench and the work piece. Besides, heavy planes work better than light ones. Perhaps you haven't been eating enough spinach, Jacob :lol:

Cheers :wink:

Paul
 

woodbloke

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Jacob":15z199ai said:
woodbloke":15z199ai said:
Jacob":15z199ai said:
There is a bit of a myth around the 7 as Alan Peters claimed to use it extensively.
No myth...if you read his book he states the case explicitly - Rob
Yes I know.
What I meant was that he has given the no 7 mythical status.
As a result a lot of hand-toolies are struggling away with great heavy planes much too big for the work in hand! :lol:

NB a lot to be said for just sticking to a no 4.
Understand...but he didn't claim to use it extensively, he did, to the exclusion of almost all other metal bench planes, and I quote..." 1 No7 jointer used for practically every hand planing operation, however short the timber" - Rob
 

Jacob

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woodbloke":3o6n1bb3 said:
.... and I quote..." 1 No7 jointer used for practically every hand planing operation, however short the timber" - Rob
Isn't that a "claim"?
I don't entirely believe him - it would be seriously impractical, albeit not impossible.
 

woodbloke

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Jacob":1phe89gp said:
woodbloke":1phe89gp said:
.... and I quote..." 1 No7 jointer used for practically every hand planing operation, however short the timber" - Rob
Isn't that a "claim"?
I don't entirely believe him - it would be seriously impractical, albeit not impossible.
Clearly, you haven't read the book Jacob...that's what it says :roll: He does use other metal bench planes, but in a limited way (No4 for site work, small block plane, scraper plane, compass plane etc)...the text is explicit, it's the No7 that gets used at the bench - Rob
 

Benchwayze

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I was going to say much the same Jacob. So There you go.

If you are stuck for a 5 1/2.... let me know.
I have to thin out my 'collection'. :)
 

marcros

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Jacob":3uv85rcu said:
woodbloke":3uv85rcu said:
.... and I quote..." 1 No7 jointer used for practically every hand planing operation, however short the timber" - Rob
Isn't that a "claim"?
I don't entirely believe him - it would be seriously impractical, albeit not impossible.
I use my renault clio for every task that I have that requires a vehicle- getting me to work and back, taking rubish to the tip, taking rotovator to the allotment, transporting wife and child etc. If I so desired, I could take it on a track day and do a whole manner of other different tasks. However, if I was to buy a car for the purpose of going fast around a racetrack, the clio 1.2L 5 door would not be on the list. Just because something can be used for a multitude of purposes eg "practically every hand planing operation" does not mean that it is a good for doing so. It could be used as a door stop, but a simple wedge would do a better job of it
 

Benchwayze

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marcros":frh7b8o0 said:
Jacob":frh7b8o0 said:
woodbloke":frh7b8o0 said:
.... and I quote..." 1 No7 jointer used for practically every hand planing operation, however short the timber" - Rob
Isn't that a "claim"?
I don't entirely believe him - it would be seriously impractical, albeit not impossible.
I use my renault clio for every task that I have that requires a vehicle- getting me to work and back, taking rubish to the tip, taking rotovator to the allotment, transporting wife and child etc. If I so desired, I could take it on a track day and do a whole manner of other different tasks. However, if I was to buy a car for the purpose of going fast around a racetrack, the clio 1.2L 5 door would not be on the list. Just because something can be used for a multitude of purposes eg "practically every hand planing operation" does not mean that it is a good for doing so. It could be used as a door stop, but a simple wedge would do a better job of it
Thanks Marcros...
Now I know what I can use an old No. 5 for. It will save me making a new tote! :lol:

:mrgreen:
 

woodbloke

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marcros":zlr543zx said:
Jacob":zlr543zx said:
woodbloke":zlr543zx said:
.... and I quote..." 1 No7 jointer used for practically every hand planing operation, however short the timber" - Rob
Isn't that a "claim"?
I don't entirely believe him - it would be seriously impractical, albeit not impossible.
I use my renault clio for every task that I have that requires a vehicle- getting me to work and back, taking rubish to the tip, taking rotovator to the allotment, transporting wife and child etc. If I so desired, I could take it on a track day and do a whole manner of other different tasks. However, if I was to buy a car for the purpose of going fast around a racetrack, the clio 1.2L 5 door would not be on the list. Just because something can be used for a multitude of purposes eg "practically every hand planing operation" does not mean that it is a good for doing so. It could be used as a door stop, but a simple wedge would do a better job of it
Absolutely...I'm not saying that the No7 is the best suited for all planing jobs on the bench (I only use mine very occasionally and much prefer my low angle jack) but that's what AP preferred, that's all - Rob
 

James C

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Thanks guys I think I'm looking at a No6 to start as it will be used for flattening and thicknessing but also for joontong short panels together this seems a good compromise.

I'm based in Hatfield so not that close to tring.

Ok so I'm going to try and buy a bedrock fore plane are there any major advocates of the Bailey pattern plane?
 
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