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Is it practical to turn wood between centres with a driving dog?

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u38cg

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I'd like to be able to turn my workpiece end to end several times during the turning process and retain concentricity, for which the standard procedure on a metal lathe is between centres working. I've never seen this done on a wood lathe and can't find any real reference to it. Is it practical/possible?

I am thinking of taking a faceplate, mounting a pin of some sort, using something like a strong cord to actually drive the workpiece and then mounting it between two revolving centres. Madness? Is it practical/possible? I was wondering if tool pressure would push the workpiece out of alignment, but then it doesn't seem a problem with long thin workpieces supported by the tailstock.
 

minilathe22

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With a drive dog (which is basically a dead centre with gripping teeth) This should be possible.
 

flh801978

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I'm too stuggling to understand what you are wanting to do
Standard practice on a wood lathe is to turn between centres....but with a drive spur or steb centre.
mark centres on the ends of your length of wood and bang in your drive centre on both ends
mount on the lathe using the drive centre and a live centre in the tailstock
You will then be able to swap ends at will retaining concentricity
you could use a faceplate and driving pin and use a dog on your wood but i wouldnt
 

marcros

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I think that vicmarc do what you want.

For me, I would probably get a matched pair of ring centres (axminster) or a same sized steb drive and live centre and use those. There may be own brand version of the stebs now, when I cast looked I couldn't find both available as the same size.
 

MusicMan

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+1 for one stebcentre to locate and drive, and a revolving centre in the tailstock.
 

Stanleymonkey

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I'd like to be able to turn my workpiece end to end several times during the turning process and retain concentricity, for which the standard procedure on a metal lathe is between centres working. I've never seen this done on a wood lathe and can't find any real reference to it. Is it practical/possible?

I am thinking of taking a faceplate, mounting a pin of some sort, using something like a strong cord to actually drive the workpiece and then mounting it between two revolving centres. Madness? Is it practical/possible? I was wondering if tool pressure would push the workpiece out of alignment, but then it doesn't seem a problem with long thin workpieces supported by the tailstock.
A cord to drive the faceplate - are you using a motor drive or something powered from a treadle?
 

Yorkieguy

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A fixed Steb centre at the chuck end and a live centre in the tailstock in the standard method of spindle turning on a woodturning lathe. Steb centres are spring loaded but will intentionally slip if you get a 'dig-in'. There are also live centres which re rather like a SteB-centre, for use in the tailstock, which have the merit that they don't open up a wide tapered hole as can happen which too much pressure is applied to a normal conical centre, like these:

Axminster Woodturning Pro Live Centre 16mm - 2MT | eBay

I don't understand the length of cord driving the workpiece - that sounds like a pole lathe not a powered lathe.
 

Inspector

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I don't understand the length of cord driving the workpiece - that sounds like a pole lathe not a powered lathe.
Let me try again. Turning between centres on a metal lathe uses a clamp that engages the part and a drive/face plate. The cord/rope trick the OP mentioned is a substitute for the drive dog to keep from marking the part. The cord is lashed to the faceplate and the part to hold/bind it. Here is what a drive dog looks like. I don't have a picture of a set up with a cord. Lathe Workholding – ToolNotes

Pete
 

Paul Hannaby

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You can just use a dead centre (like a live centre but solid) in the headstock and a standard live centre in the tailstock but as it's just a friction drive, it will only work for smallish pieces of wood and light cuts. The paired set from Axminster Mark Hancock suggests are more effective as the ring centre gives much better drive. I have a set and use them for this purpose from time to time.
 

Chippysu

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I'd like to be able to turn my workpiece end to end several times during the turning process and retain concentricity, for which the standard procedure on a metal lathe is between centres working. I've never seen this done on a wood lathe and can't find any real reference to it. Is it practical/possible?

I am thinking of taking a faceplate, mounting a pin of some sort, using something like a strong cord to actually drive the workpiece and then mounting it between two revolving centres. Madness? Is it practical/possible? I was wondering if tool pressure would push the workpiece out of alignment, but then it doesn't seem a problem with long thin workpieces supported by the tailstock.
Appreciating it can be difficult to explain an idea in words rather than showing, I'm thinking you want to work the whole length of the piece? If that's so then could you not just make the workpiece longer than needed, turn it then when finished cut off the unwanted pieces from each end? If I've got the wrong end of the stick (excuse the pun) then I'm sorry but have nothing else to offer. I'll look forward to seeing what you end up doing though. 😊
 

u38cg

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Right, sorry for not being able to reply sooner!

Steb centre - my problem here is that I want to turn a spindle that's had a hole drilled through the centre. I don't have a Steb Steb, but my knock-off Steb's centre point isn't big enough to actually centre on the hole. I also want to avoid marking the end of the piece (which may be made of wood expensive enough that cutting off an inch here and there would make you wince!)

I may have confused the issue by going on about a cord. I mean driving the workpiece in the way Marcros's link describes. I was thinking of using a cord attached to a pin to avoid marring the workpiece, but it's the same mechanical principle.

My main worry was that this was well known to be a stupid idea that any fool would know shouldn't be attempted, and since I don't seem to be getting that kind of vibe I might give it a go.
 

marcros

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could you centre drill 2 lengths of steel rod (an inch or two long), the size of your bore. superglue them in the ends of the bore so that a short length protrudes then hold 1 in a collet chuck and the other in a live centre.

when you are done, heat the steel and the superglue will fail.
 
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