How do I fit these worktops?

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Doug71

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I'm hanging some internal doors for a local builder and he's asked if while I'm there could I fit the kitchen worktops, I fit a few worktops although generally try to avoid them but I get the feeling he'd really appreciate me helping him out with this job (once this house is finished he's retiring).

As worktops aren't my thing I'm not sure what the best way is to deal with this external corner where a roughly 300mm wide top will meet a 600mm wide top, do I just do a long offset mitre or some combination of mitre and butt joint and re edge the top full length? I can't visualise anything that will look right :dunno:

joining worktop 1.jpg


The worktops are Howdens square edge laminate

joining worktop 2.jpg


@Distinterior, you are generally my font of all knowledge for these things 🤞
 
@Doug71
I appreciate the vote of confidence Doug 👍 and I can only suggest how I would do it.....I'm sure others may have a differing opinion.

As the worktops are a wood effect laminate finish, I would straight mitre them at an angle, so the grains from each section of worktop flows into one another. Obviously, as the two worktops are different depths, the mitre joint is not going to be at 45 degrees, but as it's just a straight joint, that wont matter.

The downside to just doing a straight mitre joint is, the external corner is going to be fairly sharp, even with the 2mm acrylic edging applied.

If you really want to do the "Best" job, I'd remove the existing edging from the front of both worktops, mitre & bolt & glue the joint, then rout a 25mm radius around that exposed corner, then apply one length of edging.
 
If this is the square edged one with that 45 degree arris to the top. Then I would butt the worktops at the corner, Providing the edging strip is the same sort of stuff, and not just a strip of thin laminate. If the wood laminate pattern is quite convincing then this would look better, - it is what the " joiner " in me would want to do if it were real wood.

@Distinterior raises a valid point about the sharp corner - which would be safest treated in the way he suggests. A point to remember also, should you use a butt joint, is that backs of worktops are not always plumb and true
 
Although I've never done one a Masons Mitre would seem to be the way ahead

Ideally buy a used jig in decent condition and you will be able to sell it on for what you paid for it.

 
Obviously, as the two worktops are different depths, the mitre joint is not going to be at 45 degrees, but as it's just a straight joint, that won't matter.

A query if I may. If you draw a plan view of the joint, the 600mm wide worktop will have an angle of greater than 45 degrees on it (roughly 64 degrees) and the narrow worktop will have an angle of roughly 26 degrees on it, meeting, as you say at a sharp corner.

Is there any issue with such a shallow angle? Would it limit possible positions of the bolts on the underside tying the joint together? Does the extremity of the pointy bit lack strength?

---

To the OP, maybe draw a plan view with the various options and see what looks best. Draw some squiggly lines on it it represent the grain.
 
Not on an outside corner

And another query please. What is the difference between an internal corner and an external corner other than which side of the worktop is the 'front' and which is the 'back'?

Could you not do a mason's mitre with the convex curve at the back of the 300mm wide surface?

IMG_20230707_185835.jpg
 
A query if I may. If you draw a plan view of the joint, the 600mm wide worktop will have an angle of greater than 45 degrees on it (roughly 64 degrees) and the narrow worktop will have an angle of roughly 26 degrees on it, meeting, as you say at a sharp corner.

Is there any issue with such a shallow angle? Would it limit possible positions of the bolts on the underside tying the joint together? Does the extremity of the pointy bit lack strength?

The bolts are used to hold the joint together whilst the chosen adhesive/ silicone sets....In theory, the bolts could be removed as they perform little function once the adhesive has cured.

I normally would fit 3 worktop bolts on a 600mm long joint ( this joint would be a bit longer though, but 3 bolts would still suffice) and their locations would be chosen to ensure maximum pressure across the whole joint.
You would also have to consider access from below to tighten the bolts.....

Overall, I wouldn't be concerned about the fragility of the corner as it looks well supported from the pictures Doug has posted.
Also, remember that all the worktops would be screwed and held in place from inside the cabinets.
 
And another query please. What is the difference between an internal corner and an external corner other than which side of the worktop is the 'front' and which is the 'back'?

Could you not do a mason's mitre with the convex curve at the back of the 300mm wide surface?

View attachment 162192

Of course, you could ChaiLatte, but as the worktop has a wood grain finish, it would not look anywhere near as good because the grain at the joint would be running at right angles to each other and you would still have a visible joint in the edging on the front face of the worktop......

It just depends on how good a job you may wish to do....?
 
Thanks for the replies. The original reply to Myfordman read as if a mason's mitre could not be used externally at all, hence my confusion.

I'm sorry that you are confused Chailatte and I will try to explain why I wrote what I did....

The reason for the short 45 degree angle on the masons mitre jig, is to dissect the angle at the front of the worktop.....This allows for any shaped front profile to marry together......If you were going to join the two worktops in the manner you have drawn in your little sketch, then there would be absolutely no need to cut a masons mitre at all at the back of the worktop.....It could just be a straight join!.....Are you with me?
 
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Thanks everyone for the replies.

@Distinterior it was partly the sharp corner that I was uncomfortable with and your radiused corner sounds a good way of getting over it, although I guess then I would also need to round any other end corners that there will be to match.

Regarding different opinions I asked a local kitchen fitter and his method would be to just run the 600 one full length square and butt the 300mm wide one up to it. He classed mitring them as "a bit of a risk" and also said I wouldn't be mitring the internal corners so why do the external corners as they wouldn't match?

Analysis paralysis starting to set in.......
 
I’d butt the two together, with the narrow top running through and then edge the entire length of the short side after removing the edge of the short wider strip. But really interested in others ways of doing it.
 
what normally happens if its the type of worktop I think is....remove the abs edging. mitre the corner. then radius the corner and reapply the abs edging using contact glue around the radius. but whatever is easier would be my approach. I went to a kitchen yesterday and the fitter had not left enough space for a 300mm wine fridge. how do these people ever get any work?
 
So I'm going to make a start on these worktops tomorrow, the builder wants the narrow strip running full length with the short wide piece cut in between that and the tall unit as that's how Howdens have drawn it on the plan, makes it easier for me so I'm not going to argue.

I just have a question about the edging strip I will need to apply, think it's about 2mm thick ABS type, what's the best way to stick it on? Does Evo Stik work or do you use the adhesive type tapes? Never used it before and as usual I'm getting conflicting advice, presume Howdens won't have sent anything?
 
Evo Stik offer an ABS type adhesive specifically for this type of application.......I have only used/tried it once and found it s h I t...

They do not recommend the normal brown contact adhesive on ABS....
 
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