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ColeyS1

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I've struggled with a bad back for years. On a whim I bought an electric winch and mounted it above my bench.



Its proved to be a God send. No more struggling with glue ups and moving heavy stuff around.

A small length of chain hooked over the end of a sash clamp and hook her up to the winch. Why oh why didn't I do it 10 yrs ago before I Jeffed my back up !
Anti fatigue mats should be coming next week to hopefully help with standing on horrible bumpy lumpy concrete around my bench. I think I've got old ! Lol

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pollys13

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Smart move Coley, good for you, glad to see you avoiding straining your back :)
 

ColeyS1

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Trevanion":2jgp86ql said:
Gantry crane next!
It would come in handy sometimes lol

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ColeyS1

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pollys13":2s1a8c8t said:
Smart move Coley, good for you, glad to see you avoiding straining your back :)
I think the damage has probably been done but hopefully this should prevent it getting worse.
The thing that would be useful is to be able to turn things over without the sash clamp being attached. Something like this

It's just so clumsy and the long thread of the g clamp causes issues. I'm imagining something like

Where the actual lifting eye is fixed so doesn't slide around. Its It's definitely progress, just needs a bit of titivating.

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pollys13

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Perhaps ask on the engineering, metal working forums, they are sure to have some leads.
You'll get there :)
 

Inspector

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Lifting straps/slings work well for lifts like that and if you are a clumsy twit like me they won't mark your work if you drop them on the work.

Pete
 

ColeyS1

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Inspector":1pw3010x said:
Lifting straps/slings work well for lifts like that and if you are a clumsy twit like me they won't mark your work if you drop them on the work.

Pete
I did bodge up a rope type arrangement but didn't get on too well. I'll look into sling setups. Whilst at my dad's I raided his odds and ends draw.

Perhaps something could be cobbled together with those bits and a little welding......

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Inspector

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The problem with a clamp of some kind is that they can damage the work and if you don't clamp it tight enough can slip out. Even a wood door that size will destroy your foot if it drops on it. With a sling passed under the load and one loop passed through the other and you have a noose that chokes the object. One at each end of the door with the ends of the two straps going to one of your shackles, which you hook your crane to shouldn't mar the wood or slip off. A single strap in the middle works too but you may need to adjust it to get the balance point. Do some searching for "slinging loads with straps" to find out how versatile they can be. I've watched experience machinists pick up and flip over steel and aluminium plates weighing 5 tons its a pair of lifting straps, rated for the load, with ease.

Pete
 

pollys13

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Inspector":1098wtui said:
Lifting straps/slings work well for lifts like that and if you are a clumsy twit like me they won't mark your work if you drop them on the work.

Pete
Whoops, I almost read that as, " they won't mark your work if you drop them on the ..... floor.
 

pollys13

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ColeyS1":22ae763p said:
Inspector":22ae763p said:
Lifting straps/slings work well for lifts like that and if you are a clumsy twit like me they won't mark your work if you drop them on the work.

Pete
I did bodge up a rope type arrangement but didn't get on too well. I'll look into sling setups. Whilst at my dad's I raided his odds and ends draw.

Perhaps something could be cobbled together with those bits and a little welding......

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My old spindle moulder mobile base wasn't... so mobile. I was lucky I got an as new Jet mobile base max 540 kg. half price for 50 quid 8 postage I used one of those ratchet load devices, as power feed on the machine now, made top heavy to lift.Ratchet load spreader It made all the difference lifting it up level. Attached photo of it
 

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ColeyS1

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pollys13":zkobktg0 said:
Just had a thought, those ratchet tie down lorry straps?
I think the metal part could cause damage. Buying the straps wouldnt be an issue if it's the safest way to not damage the workpiece. I think I've got a couple fairly long ones somewhere.
I have been looking into how to use them.


I could either wrap one around the middle of a door or perhaps hook them around the horns whist they're still attached. For lifting a frame its probably easier to just screw an eye to the outside and hook it up....? I'm hoping a crane operator might pop into the workshop this week and give me a lesson on how to rig it up properly lol

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Bm101

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Tdaaaaaa!

I think Inspector has it but I'd suggest a couple of options.
I do a bit of hauling at work. We use our abseil equipment (often reversed from normal way). So instead of using a descender to come down a rope, you can introduce a pulley or two, a grab device as a brake and you have a 3:1 or 6:1 hauling system. It can get quite inventive. With a couple of guys you can lift a load, carry it across space and drop it precisely. ... Anyway for your purpose most of that is redundant but a few tips might carry across, forgive the pun.

Web slings have sewn eyes and are normally quite stiff to work with. These are the type you see cranes using. Colours denote weight loads most far higher than you will approach exceeding. WLL = Working Load Limit.

Personally I'd use round slings. These are a continuous loop. They are more versatile for your needs. You can choke them in the same way but in more ways and they are also more pliable and easier to use. If you need to shorten one just a bit you can just tie a couple of knots in it.
Strikes me that you have a very limited amount of(vertical) spare space/height to work in so you need to have as an adaptable system as possible. Round slings will suit this. A couple of inches might make all the difference on occasion. As the Actress said to the Bishop.
https://www.tecni.uk/lifting-safety-equ ... und-slings
Have a look and try and work out the optimal length of the slings you will need for your tasks.

I'd get a few karabiners. Klickety Klick. ;) Easy to use. Again, these suit round slings not web slings. Get screwgate steel ones. Nowt fancy. Most krabs will take 5-8kN Along The Axis. Screwing them up is good practice and safe but doesn't make them stronger. Don't load across the gate. Also don't tighten the screws when they are loaded or you will never unscrew them if you unload the weight.
If you are really trying to save space, or for permanent fixings get maillon rapides. If you do, you HAVE to screw them up, preferably with a spanner, open they will bend under my weight (10ish stone) Pita if you have to repair a door. Little more of a problem if you are 18 floors up swinging about on a 10mm rope. DAMHIKT because I will have to lie. :| Really. :shock:

I would also look at getting some smaller round slings. Climbing ones, maybe 50 cm ones. Versatility is everything. But it also strikes me that a lot of your loads are going to be cramped up Coley like your door there. So it gives you a bit of a headache.
You either go one middle sling and balance. Not for me. But, you pays your money you takes your chances, it's wood not a person hanging there. I look at all this from a different perspective out of habit.
But cramps will interfere with using 2 slings from a central lifting point sometimes.
One more option is to introduce a lifting beam. Just a length of box steel or scaff bar for example and rig your load off two points.



I'd get them little thin climbing slings and wrap them round the bar being careful to kind of get them to loop round itself keeping it all flat to the surface of the bar. If you can get it tight enough to just get your karabiners in that's perfect. It means your slings won't slip. That means if you haven't loaded your bar centrally everything will stay on the bar. It might be a pit p*ssed but it will be safe and not slip off. You can move everything about for different lifts. That central bar doesn't need to be long, just gives you a straight vertical rig to avoid cramps. All about the options.

https://www.abaris.co.uk/prod/anchor-st ... -Sling.htm
https://www.abaris.co.uk/cat/karabiners-connectors
(for info: All this gear will have a weight rating on it. The link above has a breaking load of 30kN. Some times its WLL sometimes its Safe Working Load. It's guaranteed to that. kN is a force so technically this will lift 299kg then break. But that's nonsense. End of the day this will be load sharing with 2 anchors because there's one at either end. so these should hold up to 600kg in the air. You're covered.

(One last bore on bit. Loler is the HSE bit that deals with lifting operations and lifting equipment regulations.
Bear with me here. It's nearly over. :(
The most important single part of the legislation is (arguably) that it DEMANDS regular inspection. I know they didn't write the legislation with your shed in mind but...
Just saying Coley. Keep an eye on it. And keep keeping an eye on it every once in a while.)

Errrrrr... what else? You can buy special edge protectors for stuff you are lifting. Don't. Use some carpet offcuts if you find you need to.
Proper carpet mind, not that rubber backed s***e, pop in your local fitters they will throw it at you. Don't think you will need it mate tbh.

Tell you what Coley, I'll have a dig about in the shed mate. I definitely have some Krabs spare pm your address and they are yours.
If you're still reading I'll be amazed. :D
All the best
Chris
 

Bm101

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Edit: Coley: If you want, pm me and I'll give you my mobile and I will talk you through it. It's not rocket science if someone explains it clearly.
 

ColeyS1

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Chris you are a wonderful man thank you !!! I've got lots more stuff to look into now, round slings definitely look like they'll be easier to use then the stuff rigid flat ones I have. I'll take on board your suggestion of keeping an eye on everything. Tbh I'm a little concerned about the entire winch being held up with 2 m12 coach screws into the joist. This door will probably be the biggest and heaviest it has to lift. Its 2.2 by over a metre wide and when it was being glued had 7 clamps and two huge long ones being hoisted up and over. As you say height really was an issue !
The thing that needs to happen for this to work is for everything to be quick and efficient. Say for instance I sand one side of the door it should just be hoist down connect a few bla de blas hoist up, rotate and lower etc. Having a stash of short slings I think could be the answer to making this work- they seem cheap as chips as well!
Appreciate the offer for carbiners, though I'll add some to my shopping cart along with some slings once I figure out what I need.

I'll take some measurements tomorrow of the height between bench and winch see if I can work out a list of slings to cover all my needs. I guess lifting all this lot with just a chain was really bad practice ?

Thanks again fella [WINKING FACE]


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ColeyS1

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Might be a bit overkill !

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Bm101

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No worries man. You need anything, give me a shout.
If you are worried by anchorage look at resin bolts. Tbh you'll probably be ok but no point having a 3 tonne sling on a 3 pound anchor.
Cheers
Chris
 

mindthatwhatouch

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Endless Webbing slings, something around the 15-20 mm wide mark, you can also buy it by the metre and knot it.
 

LBCarpentry

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My very first thought was........why are your horns all different lengths, and why are your tenons that long?
 
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