Hand painted finish over a sprayed base on a kitchen

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tsb

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I've read a few posts on here from professional kitchen manufacturers that say, they spray a primer, then a top coat in the colour of the kitchen and then after the kitchen has been fitted, the decorator goes in to give a hand painted finish. Can I pick your brains and ask what paint you use for the primer, first coat and finish coat. i.e. do you use pre cat for a primer, AC for a spray finish and a water based paint for the hand finish?
 

Tuna808

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I hand painted my kitchen that had clear satin varnish ,which i had put on 20 years ago when I made the kitchen.
I first used a degreaser on them applied with a scouring pad,removed the traces of degreaser and the use a one coat primer from Crown.
I decided for a satin grey,I used Crown kitchen paint,although I think it’s designed for kitchen walls,it work very well…..used a high quality brush and it covered well with two coats.
changed the drawers and door knobs and it revamped the kitchen completely.
 

Joshjosh

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I've read a few posts on here from professional kitchen manufacturers that say, they spray a primer, then a top coat in the colour of the kitchen and then after the kitchen has been fitted, the decorator goes in to give a hand painted finish. Can I pick your brains and ask what paint you use for the primer, first coat and finish coat. i.e. do you use pre cat for a primer, AC for a spray finish and a water based paint for the hand finish?
I use water based for the lot. Better for the planet and I'm not really set up for spraying high Voc paint.
I use a morrels wb primer, spray 2 coats of either tikkurilla helmi or little Greene intelligent eggshell followed by 1 brushed coat. I do all this in the workshop with just touch ups on site.
 

tsb

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I use water based for the lot. Better for the planet and I'm not really set up for spraying high Voc paint.
I use a morrels wb primer, spray 2 coats of either tikkurilla helmi or little Greene intelligent eggshell followed by 1 brushed coat. I do all this in the workshop with just touch ups on site.
That's great infor. I've hand painted a few kitchens using Helmi and it's great paint but not tried spray painting it. I read that a few use ac or pu for the undercoats because of speed of drying and then hand paint a top coat on site and was wondering if a paint like Helmi or F&B would stick to it
 

scholar

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I use water based for the lot. Better for the planet and I'm not really set up for spraying high Voc paint.
I use a morrels wb primer, spray 2 coats of either tikkurilla helmi or little Greene intelligent eggshell followed by 1 brushed coat. I do all this in the workshop with just touch ups on site.
That is interesting - for the final hand brushed coat, do you spray this on, then hand drag it or apply the paint by brush?

Cheers
 

Joshjosh

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I've only got about years experience painting my own work, so I'm not that experienced, but I'm happy with the level of finish I'm getting ATM.

I don't find that w/b slows me down really, for a kitchen sized job by the time I've sprayed the last component and stopped for a break I can usually start spraying the opposite side of the piece I started on.
I have a burner on in winter getting temps to around 20c which helps allot

I usually allow about 2 weeks for sanding/prep, primer, de nib/filling, 2 sprayed coats, 1 brushed, packaging for transport.

I've tried brushing a sprayed coat but found on larger panels the paint would dry too quick and start dragging. So use plenty of floetrol, roll it on and lay it off with a brush.

I have had people tell me they use a solvent based primer (,to stop grain raise) then water based ontop
 

Spectric

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I hand paint the primer and top coats but that is because that is the finish I want, some people go for the super high gloss glass finishes because they like that ultra modern look and then you need to spray. I like the Johnstones range of paints, they can match colors to F&B or have a good range themselves, always avoid dulux but have used crown in the past. Decent brushes really help, just like I once thought a chiesel is a chiesel until I learnt better, the same is true for brushes and many are no longer made from the buttocks hair of wild boars! I like the ranges from both Picasso and Wooster in straight and angled types and with water based paints are a lot easier to keep clean. On flat surfaces I find getting the paint on is easier with a roller and then lay it off with a decent brush like Josh has said and walk away, don't dabble or retouch just leave it alone. With these water based paints you will find adding floetrol to the paint will help keep the wet edge, again like josh has mentioned.
 
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