Painting new made sash windows

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Matthew Woodworks

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Hi,
I've just made 4 boxes and 8 sashes in joinery pine for my own house (followed Olly Bradshaws brilliant you tube videos and paid the £60 for his sample drawing). I usually make kitchens in solid timber but have enjoyed making the windows but would like some advice if anybody has any on a good method for painting/finishing. My vague plan at the moment is to give them 2 coats of a primer/undercoat (acrylic) and then top coat by hand once fitted. My question is, should I perhaps give them a covering of some sort of wood preservative first? Or is there a super duper primer that anyone can recommend.
Many thanks in advance
Matthew
 
I am a great advocate of water based/acrylic paints for use inside and out, but, for new exterior work I have a different approach.
Soak everything in a clear wood preservative, including all of the beading and trims that have been cut/mitred to fit.
Apply 2 coats of aluminium primer.
Then apply a coat of your acrylic finish before installation and a further two coats after. For the outside I found Dulux Weathershield Aquatec, before they renamed it, a wonderful product.

Colin
 
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I would suggest you might as well get some top coat on before you fit them, it's much easier than trying to paint them in situ, also some bits on sash windows can't be painted once the sashes are in.

I will leave others to debate acrylic v spirit based v linseed oil paint ;)
 
I am a great advocate of water based/acrylic paints for use inside and out, but, for new exterior work I have a different approach.
Soak everything in a clear wood preservative, including all of the beading and trims that have been cut/mitred to fit.
Apply 2 coats of aluminium primer.
Then apply a coat of your acrylic finish before installation and a further two coats after. For the outside I found Dulux Weathershield Aquatec, before they renamed it, a wonderful product.

Colin

I said I would keep out of the paint debate but like @eribaMotters I often use Dulux aluminium primer with Dulux Ultimate Opaque over the top but I use the spirit based version of the Ultimate Opaque.
 
When making windows, gates etc. I've always pickled the parts in a good preservative before assembling them. Knotting, aluminium primer and a coat of undercoat before fitting gives you a bit of leeway if the weather turns on you. Touch up any fitting damage or missed bits, undercoat again and gloss.
I notice on gloss tins now it often says to use two coats of gloss, but I've always found it better to use two coats of undercoat and one gloss.
 
Hi
I am a great advocate of water based/acrylic paints for use inside and out, but, for new exterior work I have a different approach.
Soak everything in a clear wood preservative, including all of the beading and trims that have been cut/mitred to fit.
Apply 2 coats of aluminium primer.
Then apply a coat of your acrylic finish before installation and a further two coats after. For the outside I found Dulux Weathershield Aquatec, before they renamed it, a wonderful product.

Colin
 
I notice on gloss tins now it often says to use two coats of gloss, but I've always found it better to use two coats of undercoat and one gloss.
That was always the way my father taught me and - much later on - when I took up a management position with Mander's Paints the induction course made a very specific point of stating that the top coat (Gloss, Matt, Eggshell . . . ) was just a cosmetic covering, the Primer & Undercoats doing the job of protection.
 
First of all many thanks for the advice and time given to my question - I think what i'll do is give all the bare timber a brushed coat of timber preservative and then spray coat a couple of aluminum primer (this seems the way forward) and then following advice above a coat of the dulux weathershield and then one further coat once fitted.
 
If its new stuff in I normally fully fit the sashes and cut all beads in, including draughtproof grooves in sashes then dissasemble for paint. This way you can paint everything and wont have to shoot anything in after fitting.
Use a preservative on any softwood including knotting if needed, spray prime everything, denib it then put in the DGU`s or single glass using heritage putty or timbaglaze, wait for it to dry mask the glass then spray topcoat. I have used Teknos and Morrells, I prefer Morrells but there are better paints also.
If brush finishing I use Tikkurilla Otex primer ( this is a very superior primer and denibs perfectly smooth ) and their topcoat.
This is a basic description.

Ollie
 
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If its new stuff in I normally fully fit the sashes and cut all beads in, including draughtproof grooves in sashes then dissasemble for paint. This way you can paint everything and wont have to shoot anything in after fitting.
Use a preservative on any softwood including knotting if needed, spray prime everything, denib it then put in the DGU`s or single glass using heritage putty or timbaglaze, wait for it to dry mask the glass then spray topcoat. I have used Teknos and Morrells, I prefer Morrells but there are better paints also.
If brush finishing I use Tikkurilla Otex primer ( this is a very superior primer and denibs perfectly smooth ) and their topcoat.
This is a basic description.

Ollie
That's brilliant advice Olly - many thanks - I'll use the Tikkurilla primer I think. I have a deep aversion to paint and painting but will set about the task in hand knowing I'm approaching it in the right way :)
 
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