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CHJ

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Never, skin caught on a revolving chuck or work piece has a habit of breaking and letting go.
A glove caught in the same manner has a habit of holding its own until finger or hand, arm whatever settles its argument with the horsepower needed to stop the motor.
 

knappers

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Paul Hannaby":17y7yjmp said:
Same here - I wouldn't wear gloves while turning.
Surely you need somewhere to tuck the ends of your scarf?

Si.
 

loz

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Never,

But i do yelp like a puppy when turning banksia nuts, or natural edges .
 

nev

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i know where you're coming from chris, i was turning a bit of cherry the other day and i was being flailed with the bark before i got down to wood, but it seems the consensus is nowt that can catch.
how about a gauntlet :mrgreen:
 

chrisbaker42

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This is exactly the reason I ask the questions on here so I benefit from the wisdom of others and therefore make fewer silly mistakes, I'd certainly rather put up with the slight discomfort of hot shavings etc. than lose a hand.

Thanks for the advice' I'll certainly not be bothering with a glove.
 

Blister

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I do use a glove on my left hand when heavy turning
The heat from the wood / shavings burns
I always make sure the gloved hand is well away from any catch hazard
 

Chippygeoff

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Hi Chris.

I can understand your query. We all get hot shavings coming off the timber and bits of bark, I just hold my hand back further down the tool and stand as far as safety will allow. I have never worn gloves for the same reasons the other guys have given. I would like to add to this debate as well as it is one and the same thing.

Many years ago I thought I would lose my left arm. I was down in the workshop and it was winter and cold. I had a couple of T shirts on and a couple of jumpers. I was working away and was doing some shaping at the back side of the bowl I was making when the chuck caught the end of the sleeve of my jumper, it all happened in a split second, my arm was pulled into the chuck with tremendous force and in an instant the chuck ground to a halt and at the same time the lathe came off the two breeze blocks I had at either end to make it higher, I managed to reach the off switch with my right hand and turn the lathe off and then again with my right hand grabbed the lathe bed and lifted it back onto the breeze blocks. I have no idea where I got the strength to lift the lathe like that. I remember my brother coming round with a trolley jack and lifting the lathe for me with a load of blocks so we could get the two breeze blacks underneath the legs. I managed to cut the jumper from the chuck with a knife and with blood pouring from my arm. I was rushed off to hospital where they sorted me out. It is a lesson I learnt the hard way and now I always make sure I have no loose clothing when I am at the lathe.
 

Jonzjob

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I can only agree with all that has been said. No gloves, not even for throwing the gauntlet down, and no loose cuffs or clothing.

Also, mainly for the ladies. If you have long hair please make sure that it can't get anywhere near and turning parts. Lathe, saw, drill, etc. During the war my mother used to work in a factory, nights, drilling various parts for aircraft guns and one of her friends was literally scalped when her hair got caught in her drill press. It killed her!
 

nev

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Yes, safety in the workshop is paramount.
once knew a lady that stepped backwards into a table saw - Disaster!










dis assed her. no? i'll get my coat :roll:
 

chrisbaker42

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Talking of long hair takes me back to my hippy days when for a short time I worked in a place that had a polishing machine and a friend who had really long hair got it caught, fortunately it was thick enough to clog up the machine and all he lost were his wondrous locks which of course we had to cut off as his face was only inches from the machine head.
 

jumps

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chrisbaker42":1yhivsoc said:
Talking of long hair takes me back to my hippy days when for a short time I worked in a place that had a polishing machine and a friend who had really long hair got it caught, fortunately it was thick enough to clog up the machine and all he lost were his wondrous locks which of course we had to cut off as his face was only inches from the machine head.
I believe a lady lost her life in the last 12 months (US) when her hair got caught when turning...
 
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