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Bean

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Hi all
I need to make some new Garage Doors for the workshop. I have in mind some Ledged and Braced side hinged doors. While I have the general idea and design I am wondering about any pitfalls I may run up against.
Any advice will be appreciated

Bean
 

Steve Maskery

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HI Bean
Mine are fairly trad ledged and braced.
Pitfalls?
1 Make sure your centre stiles are diferent widths, so that when you rebate them together they look the same width from the front.

2 Make sure your braces go upwards from the hinge stile to the lock stile, not the other way round. They stop the door sagging, so act as a prop.

3 Make your bottom rail thinner than the stiles by the thickness of your matchboarding. They can join the stile with a bare-faced tenon. The matchboarding should run from the top (or from your window, if you have them) to the ground. If they are inset, then water will gather and rot your frame.

I made mine to take 4-6-4 double glaxed sealed units in the top half, obscure so people can't see in, but they provide lots of light. I also packed the interstices (good word for this time of night) with glass wool insulation and boarded it in from the inside.

Any other ideas, anyone?
Cheers
Steve
 

DaveL

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Hi Bean,

Try to get some hinges with grease nipples on them. (Or add some :) )
On my last workshop I made double doors but only open one most of the time. When I did try to open the other door, one of the hinges had seized. Was a right %&*£~ to sort out. :? I had to take it off the door, heat it and put into my large engineenrs vice to free it. :shock:
 

Bean

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Thank You Steve and Dave
I had missed the points about the Centre and Bottom Stiles Thanks, and its a good point abut the grease nipples on the hinges as I am intending to do just the same as you and really only operate one door.

Bean
 
A

Anonymous

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Hi Bean

My workshop ( former garage) doors were fallng down but i chose to patch them up rather than spend the £300-£400 to replace them or indeed the £150 to make some new ones

More money for tools :D
 

Bean

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Apart from the doors being approx 40 years old and softwood, they are now rotten, I can almost poke my finger through some of the stiles, consequently I dare not open it for fear of it collapsing. Plus as the door is a canopy style it take up a lot of room I could use in the garage.

To prevent the early onset of rot I was planning to use tanalised timber as I have a good supply locally.

Bean
 
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Anonymous

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Yep, mine were rotten to.

One of the doors had two rotten styles. I chopped out the rotten bits and patched them up.

I had to angle grind the hinges off on one door.

At one time I wished I had made new doors but I eventually finished them and treated myself to a new contractors table saw with the money I saved

before:



After:



Its not carpentary, but it does me :wink:

Edit: Incidently, mine were softwood, 40 years old too. They only reason they had rotted was water had penertrated where the putty had cracked on the glazing rotting the stiles and the cross lats under the glazing
 

Steve Maskery

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Bean
If you are planning to use tanalised timer (good idea, methinks), make your doors out of ordinary unsorted. Then, when you have cut all the joints, dry-assembled it all and are happy that everything is OK, DISMANTLE IT ALL, take it all back to the timberyard and get them to tanalise the components. Then you can glue it all together.
The reason I suggest all this, is that tanalising is a SURFACE coating, the level of penetration is quite low. So if you buy tanalised wood, then cut it and plane it and sand it, you are removing the protection.
Oh yes, and choose a fine day to collect it, it will stink!
Cheers
Steve
 

Bean

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Good Point Steve

Nice doors Bilzee, mine are in a simular state, painted and the wood has rotted behind it.

Bean
 
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