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G-Plan Table refurb.

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J-G

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I read virtually everything that is posted here (and learn a lot) but seldom post. Now I have a need for specific advice.

I've been asked to refurbish a Teak G-Plan table which has seen a goodly amount of use as a simple 4' circular unit and very occasional use with the centre leaf brought into play.

As you can imagine over the years the main table has suffered general wear and tear but the centre leaf hasn't so there is a marked difference in the appearance.

I'm looking for opinion as to how to go about this . . . purely mechanical -- sanding/scraping the surface or chemical -- remove what is left of the original finish using solvents?

There is some local damage which will require other work such as filler as well but initially I'm looking for advice on the best way forward and whether I should also strip the centre leaf back to bare wood since the chance of 'matching' seems remote.

Two photo's attached to give you some idea of the job.

It's been a while since I did any 'French Polishing' though I do have Shellac and Meths on the shelf.
 

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AJB Temple

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Depends what gear you have. I would sand it. In my case I have a Mirka rotary with extractor, and Abranet. It would strip the entire top, including centre, ready for refinish, in an hour.
 

GrahamF

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Whatever method you use, bear in mind that G Plan tables are veneered chipboard, not solid as many owners seem to think.
 

J-G

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AJB Temple":6pxerpfy said:
Depends what gear you have. I would sand it. In my case I have a Mirka rotary with extractor, and Abranet. It would strip the entire top, including centre, ready for refinish, in an hour.
It certainly does! I have a small cheap orbital sander but nothing in the class of the Mirka kit - nor am I likely to purchase such for this one-off job :)

The fact that you suggest also stripping the centre leaf is encouraging - I'm sure that's the way to go.

Abranet is on my radar but I haven't been able to find any to fit the half-sheet sander I have.

I am considering buying a circular orbital sander but it's more likely to be in the Bosch range than Festool or Mirka. Any recommendations would be appreciated.

GrahamF ":6pxerpfy said:
Whatever method you use, bear in mind that G Plan tables are veneered chipboard, not solid as many owners seem to think.
Thanks, I'm well aware of that - in a previous life I used to sell G-Plan (and other ) furniture. The rim is of course solid Teak but the veneer on the main body will be something less than 0.7mm thick, that's why I'm conflicted about Sanding/Scraping as opposed to chemical stripping.

Having now seen a previous posting about a G-Plan Table, I'm also considering the Polyvine Wax Finish Varnish rather than French Polish.
 

AJB Temple

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The fact that it is veneered was news to me, (never had any any G plan) but that would stop me using chemical strippers. The last thing I would want is the veneer detaching from the sub strata. I would still sand, but maybe take a bit longer and start with a finer abranet.

The reason I like abranet, is if your sander is hooked up to a vacuum, there is almost zero dust. Hence no clogging, abrasive lasts longer, and you work faster. Clean too obviously.

Can't advise on sanders sorry. For ROS I have a cheap German one that is terrible (this uses paper disks with holes punched in - useless compared with abranet), couple of Mirka's and have used the Festool variant (prefer Mirka for this). I do realise there is a massive price difference between the pro stuff like this and DIY end of the market. In my experience there is a massive performance difference too. Maybe you could hire for a day?

Without doubt do the centre leaf. You will never colour match it otherwise.
 

flh801978

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D862B381-2381-47B9-BBBB-909C8CF11255.jpeg

How strange about 3 weeks ago my daughter bought a very sorry looking table in excellent condition apart from the top for £10
The leaf and the under frame were in near perfect condition but it was decided to refinish the leaf as well.it was sanded with a Bosch ROS to 180 grit and finished with osmo satin polyx
6167D5D9-3767-4DB3-B128-F4ADD6BBE668.jpeg


However the leaf ended up a completely different colour but she’s happy with it for now
C275393E-5655-4E3A-A962-ACD0648FF56F.jpeg



Ian
 

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AndyT

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Woody2Shoes":1by6kj5f said:
If you fancy a workout, but don't want to spend too much, you can get the Mirka/Abranet experience for relatively little cash e.g.:

https://www.axminster.co.uk/mirka-sandi ... n-ax851921
That's my preferred sanding method these days - very good control and virtually dust free. The only downside is the noise of the vacuum cleaner.

I recently refinished a little side table which might have been G-plan. Veneered top, sprayed varnish of some sort with a bit of damage from damp and heat.

I just gave it a light rub over with some open weave abrasive pads like these https://www.axminster.co.uk/hermes-webr ... ad-ax23609, not trying to remove all the finish but just to even the surface colour. I definitely didn't want to go through the veneer so hand work made sense - and it was a very small table.

I then wiped on two coats of Osmo Poly-x with a rag, wiping off the excess after 10 minutes and letting it dry overnight between coats. It worked well and brightened it up nicely.
 

--Tom--

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Judging by Ian’s post sanding is the way to go- I’d be chuffed with that result from the before pic.

I grew up with one of these tables and had the chore of wax polishing it which always seemed a pointless task as it had a table cloth over it for most of its life....
 

ED65

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J-G":3vkuypsn said:
I'm looking for opinion as to how to go about this . . . purely mechanical -- sanding/scraping the surface or chemical -- remove what is left of the original finish using solvents?
Since nobody else is going to say it stripping should be the first port of call to get the previous finish off. It's not a pleasant job and it always takes more time and effort than expected, but that doesn't change the fact that it's the best way to get old finish off.

Some sanding is nearly always necessary and here it seems it's very likely it will be needed (in addition to some use of oxalic acid), but for bulk removal of finish sanding should be the method of last recourse, especially where you don't want to risk going through veneers of uncertain thickness and/or want to retain patina.

J-G":3vkuypsn said:
It's been a while since I did any 'French Polishing' though I do have Shellac and Meths on the shelf.
The original wasn't finished in shellac so p'rhaps not the best choice for new finish here. What's the requirement in terms of durability and resistance? Use that as your main basis for choosing the new finish as it trumps everything else.

If it's of help, the original finish is not what people often suppose (guess!) it was. From the mid-60s at least they were using a polyurethane.
 

J-G

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ED65":2ghdpdfq said:
Since nobody else is going to say it stripping should be the first port of call to get the previous finish off.

J-G":2ghdpdfq said:
It's been a while since I did any 'French Polishing' though I do have Shellac and Meths on the shelf.
The original wasn't finished in shellac so p'rhaps not the best choice for new finish here. What's the requirement in terms of durability and resistance? Use that as your main basis for choosing the new finish as it trumps everything else.

If it's of help, the original finish is not what people often suppose (guess!) it was. From the mid-60s at least they were using a polyurethane.
Thanks for that detailed evaluation of the issues involved. I'm just about to go shopping for materials/equipment so timely as well.

I've done quite a bit of research already and will probably use Polyvine Wax Finish Varnish since durability is important.

I don't know the actual age of the table so can't be sure that it is post mid-60s and therefore probably polyurethane so am unsure what to consider as a stripping medium........ hmmmm.... think I'll have to consult the oracles at Axminster :)
 

J-G

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Well, I'm no further forward - - - I suppose that's not quite true since I have done some more research and found some posts from 2018 (particularly by ED65) - - - but the Axminster staff were no real benefit (good though their advice was -- ie "No that won't do the job"). I was looking at the Libron Wax and Polish Remover.

Thinking outside the box as-it-were, is it likely that Cellulose Thinners would soften what remains of the finish - and for that matter, the still good finish on the centre leaf - and therefore make scrapping back to bare wood/veneer a relatively painless job? ..... or should I be looking at something along the lines of a Nitromores product (replacement)?
 

TheTiddles

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I really wouldn’t bother with paint stripper in less you have to use it, it’s nasty stuff and can burn you very easily.

If you don’t have a decent ROS (the Makita is excellent by the way). You could use a cabinet scraper to quickly remove the finish. Either way, you’re going to need to sand it before finishing g.

The centre lead will not end up the same colour, but leave it out in the sun and it’ll start getting there

Aidan
 

flh801978

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J-G

as i said in my post that awfull top took only 20 mins with a ROS to finish ready to oil
even the centre leaf took only 5 mins to sand off

dont even think about chemicals for such a small easy to sand top that you are going to have to sand anyway

Ian
 

Nico Adie

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flh801978":3vvgxxlw said:
J-G

as i said in my post that awfull top took only 20 mins with a ROS to finish ready to oil
even the centre leaf took only 5 mins to sand off

dont even think about chemicals for such a small easy to sand top that you are going to have to sand anyway

Ian
^ What he said.

I've refinished 4 tables of this type, never once used stripper. Sand from 120 grit, going up the grits to 320, sometimes 400. Finished with danish oil (Colron, because that's what I bought and a bottle lasts aaaaaages).
 

J-G

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Finally, I've made a decision!

I've bought a Makita BO8031 ROS and some Abranet discs. Total cost greater than the price I estimated for the job but of course I now have a decent sanding system which will help me to do other work.

I haven't yet finally decided what finish to use, I'll leave that until I've done the stripping.

Thanks to all for the input.
 

TheTiddles

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A decent ROS was one of the few tools I’ve bought where I immediately kicked myself for not buying one years before, it’s just so good
(A bandsaw was another, FYI)

Aidan
 

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