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Hand Plane

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Has anyone got experience of restoring a mid-1970's circular G-Plan table?

We treated our table with teak oil as per the instructions given at time of purchase in 1975, and after 30 years it was looking very tired, faded and grubby through constant use. The veneer and wood trim are all in very good condition; it was the surface treatment which was shot through.

So I stripped it down using wax/oil remover with steel wool, cleaned up with white spirit and methys. I then re-finished with Danish oil. I can't remember if I tried staining it as it was light in colour from fading. The Danish oil finish didn't last long. Within a couple of years it had deteriorated and rubbed off at seating positions and looked poor and grubby.

So I stripped it down again. It was then re-finished with a wax-oil product. I used a coloured wax-oil product to get some colour into the finish. This wax-oil finish has not lasted long either and it needs the kiss of life again as looking very tatty.

I have considered and experimented with other finishes.

For example, I would get a better colour match to other G-Plan furniture using a spirit stain. However, having seen how much a spirit stain lost its colour on another table I made some years ago, (finished with sprayed on cellulose lacquer), then I wouldn't be happy to use a spirit stain on the G-Plan table.

I don't have access to a spray system these days, so a cellulose spray finish is not applicable.

I have considered a hand applied acrylic finish (which I have used on may other pieces) but I haven't found one which is semi-gloss/semi-matt; they all appear to be high gloss which would not suit this application. A similar situation applies to small quantity proprietary lacquers/varnishes.

Years ago you could get an oil based polyurethane varnish in matt, semi-matt and gloss. These were very durable and I would go this route, preferably with a compatible tint, to achieve a long lasting finish. I'm not aware of a suitable product at this time.

So comments and suggestions welcome.
 

woodbloke66

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Hand Plane":3b6uvb0w said:
I have considered a hand applied acrylic finish (which I have used on may other pieces) but I haven't found one which is semi-gloss/semi-matt; they all appear to be high gloss which would not suit this application. A similar situation applies to small quantity proprietary lacquers/varnishes.

So comments and suggestions welcome.
Try the Polyvine Wax finish. Available in flat matt, satin etc and superb. Apply thinly, cut back each time with 1500g w/d paper (or similar) and gradually build up the thickness of finish required; finally polish with some Burnishing Cream if needed - Rob
 

Hand Plane

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Thank you for the Polyvine suggestion. It's something which I haven't encountered, so I'll do some experimenting.
 

Hand Plane

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I finally got round to attacking the G-plan table.

After several test pieces, testing for colour and finish, I decided to take the recommendation of woodbloke66 and opted for Polyvine Wax Finish Varnish, satin finish.

What was surprising in preparing the table top, was that despite the amount of the existing wax oil finish which come away within a few years, the majority of the table top resisted wire wool with a wax/oil remover. So most of the removal required a hand scraping. The table top was then cleaned up with methys and wire wool.

One coat of Polyvine Teak was sufficient for the desired colour. This was followed by five coats of clear satin. Between coats, it was given a light rub down with 0000 wire wool..

One particular problem experienced using the Polyvine was despite the room only being at 20 degrees, it was drying very quickly.

By the time one stroke was made across the table top, 4 feet wide, and by the time I went back to the beginning it was already tacky. This made it difficult to achieve a nice even finish over the surface without dry areas or brush strokes showing.

Polyvine advised 10% dilution could be made, which gave a slight improvement. They also suggested a fan to cool the room. This wasn't and option open to me. I have successfully used other acrylic finishes on other projects, but not over such a surface area at one time, and never experience such a rapid drying issue.

Soft bristle, synthetic and natural haired, brushes were used, without significant difference.

Despite the above, I have achieved a very satisfactory finish. Looks good, feels good. If it lasts longer than the previous wax oil finish, I will be well pleased. (Now attempting to include photograph)


Many thanks to woodbloke66 for his suggestion.
 

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Hand Plane":19yga9xs said:
I finally got round to attacking the G-plan table.

After several test pieces, testing for colour and finish, I decided to take the recommendation of woodbloke66 and opted for Polyvine Wax Finish Varnish, satin finish.

What was surprising in preparing the table top, was that despite the amount of the existing wax oil finish which come away within a few years, the majority of the table top resisted wire wool with a wax/oil remover. So most of the removal required a hand scraping. The table top was then cleaned up with methys and wire wool.

One coat of Polyvine Teak was sufficient for the desired colour. This was followed by five coats of clear satin. Between coats, it was given a light rub down with 0000 wire wool..

One particular problem experienced using the Polyvine was despite the room only being at 20 degrees, it was drying very quickly.

By the time one stroke was made across the table top, 4 feet wide, and by the time I went back to the beginning it was already tacky. This made it difficult to achieve a nice even finish over the surface without dry areas or brush strokes showing.

Polyvine advised 10% dilution could be made, which gave a slight improvement. They also suggested a fan to cool the room. This wasn't and option open to me. I have successfully used other acrylic finishes on other projects, but not over such a surface area at one time, and never experience such a rapid drying issue.

Soft bristle, synthetic and natural haired, brushes were used, without significant difference.

Despite the above, I have achieved a very satisfactory finish. Looks good, feels good. If it lasts longer than the previous wax oil finish, I will be well pleased. (Now attempting to include photograph)


Many thanks to woodbloke66 for his suggestion.
It certainly looks the part. One of the benefits of living in the UK: not hot!

If this has to be below 20 degrees, I would be able to consistently apply it between mid November and March. January is the only month I could be certain about. Sunny Bob probably can't use it ever. Too hot at 20°? Wow.

(I wondered about the fan advice: it wouldn't change the temperature, but would increase the evaporation rate, I would expect. Wouldn't that make things worse? Not done the experiment, but just musing out loud, as it were).
 

AndyT

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Thanks for taking the time to report back. I'd be surprised if it wasn't, but it's nice to see that Rob's advice was on the money.
 

Jacob

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Did similar with raw linseed oil, after a careful wash down with soapy water. Looks good and brings out the colour. Very durable, easy to put on, easy to put more one. Needs to be rubbed out thin very soon after application. Polishes up if required, after a week or so.
 

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