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Rorschach

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Not specifically what you asked, but painting it a dark green would make it less offensive if your neighbours are ok with this. Then perhaps some honey suckle and clemetis.
Be careful with this, the paint will often bleed through and your neighbours will not be happy, seen this happen to a friend.
 

Cirks

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It certainly could be worse but I can’t imagine they suddenly did this without you knowing in advance or do you and your neighbours not talk (especially over the original picket fence)? It sounds looks Ken you were surprised when the new fence appeared!
Anyway, assuming you do get on, I can’t imagine they would have an issue with some trellises attached to it or simply some wires for climbers or just taller plants to be attached to. If the colour bothers you, then again, I’m sure they wouldn’t mind your side being painted with appropriate green preservative for example. You’ll eventually get used to it and at least there’s privacy afforded by it.

Regarding which way round and what can can’t be done (I had always worked on belief that smooth side should face neighbour but looks like I was wrong)
 

Robbo60

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I would bet the concrete post will be there when you are long gone. Drilling and plugging to take small eyes for wires won't hurt them. Some good plant suggestion. Also Passion flowers are good climbers and amazing looking
 

Sandyn

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Generally I think it looks pretty good, but the concrete posts are a bit industrial and make it look more like motorway screening than a garden fence. The way I would look at it is: I just got a new fence and it didn't cost me a penny and I won't have to maintain it. Then I would put a stainless steel wiring support system along the line of the fence and plant it with climbers and shrubs, turn it into a feature.
Don't let it get to you, otherwise it will bug you forever. Life's too short.
 

Glitch

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One of those things where you either need to suck it up or spend money on a solution.
You could put your own fence in.
Plant some ivy or other aggressive climber and wait for the neighbours to complain when it grows through the panels.
Get some Fake hedge to cover it
Put a few randomly placed 'feature' trellis panels on your side to break up the lines.

I'm sure you'll get used to it after it's had time to mellow.
 

Doug B

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We won’t be doing anything to the new fence, these neighbours fell out with their neighbours on the other side almost as soon as they moved in & we don’t want to do anything that could cause animosity.

We weren’t asked about changing the fence just told it was being done, I appreciate some folks might like this style of fence but unfortunately we don’t & certainly not 70 straight foot of it in what is a pretty narrow garden.

I don’t have a photo of the previous picket fence but it was 3’ high that gave an open aspect with 3 different clematis that grew along its length each year, although I’m more a vegetable grower & do my gardening at the allotment even I appreciate how pretty my wife kept it.

As to not being calm, I am. The simple reason I asked the question is the upset it has caused my wife, she is a passionate knowledgeable gardener & this 6’ high solid barrier has completely changed the appearance & aspect of the garden she has lovingly tended for nigh on 20 years.

All I’m looking for is a way to break the impact such a dramatic change has made. Thanks @robgul my wife likes this suggestion, she has had her head buried in her gardening books for the last couple of days one of which suggested using different styles of covering along the length of the fence rather than just one & ending up with another long solid surface.

I Imagine we will end up with some horizontal laths as per that design as it will also enable climbing plants to do just that. We have also been looking at larch interwoven panels these again would enable the plants to climb.
She would prefer to go for climbers as with such a narrow garden shrubs can quickly become too large & evasive.

Cheers all.
 

TheTiddles

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There’s nothing like a fence to stir up passion it seems.

Theres no rule, law or even standard about which side faces what, except in some very specific circumstances. There’s also a great deal of things you don’t have to do at all, like tell your neighbour you’re putting a fence up. Though polite consideration would normally suggest it’s done.

If they replaced a picket fence with 6’ panels it might suggest they want a bit more privacy, something they are plenty entitled too.

Aidan
 

Doug71

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Speaking from experience it is amazing the trouble and expense fences can cause, I have seen people use rusty old zinc sheets just to annoy their neighbour :rolleyes:

Hope you manage to sort something that makes you both feel happier about the new fence, it's never easy with things like this that are out of your control.
 

johnny

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apologies if this has been suggested by others but why not ask if you can at least paint the fence.

If you use a water based paint it can be painted even in cold weather and will long outlast oil based paints .

I use Ronseal Ducksback paint on my fences and sheds and it lasts at least 4x years between coats. its incredibly cheap and a 5l tin goes a long way at under £10 .

The crucial thing about this paint is that the Forest Green version dries a dark grass green colour and blends into the garden incredibly well in both summer and Winter . Because it is a natural colour it doesn't stand out like some more synthetic colours do like the shed in next doors garden . Apologies for the poor image taken through the conservatory window
SAM_0045.JPG
 

Benchwayze

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I

John, our new place came with 50% ownership/maintainence costs written into our house deeds. The P.O. obviously had forethought about boundary issues!
Sam
Hi Sam.

In my case my left-hand boundary fence is shared by the ends of five neighbouring gardens. They all seem to plump for 6-ft high panels which suits me. However, renewal is required at different intervals, so there always seems to be at least one gap! I have to troop around to the Grove, knock on a door and and ask when are they going to make the necessary repair. Sometimes they don't even know the wind has done its work again. Never had any disputes though, so I can't really complain. My actual street neighbour is a widow of 90+ and some 20 years ago her husband repaired the fence to my side entry way. It's still in good condition. (Although the feather board cladding was fixed slightly out of plumb!). Until I had my own health issues I used to spray the fence on my side with creosote every couple of years. I think it needs doing again actually. Oh well; better contact my current handyman/gardener. 😇

John
 
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robgul

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We won’t be doing anything to the new fence, these neighbours fell out with their neighbours on the other side almost as soon as they moved in & we don’t want to do anything that could cause animosity.

We weren’t asked about changing the fence just told it was being done, I appreciate some folks might like this style of fence but unfortunately we don’t & certainly not 70 straight foot of it in what is a pretty narrow garden.

I don’t have a photo of the previous picket fence but it was 3’ high that gave an open aspect with 3 different clematis that grew along its length each year, although I’m more a vegetable grower & do my gardening at the allotment even I appreciate how pretty my wife kept it.

As to not being calm, I am. The simple reason I asked the question is the upset it has caused my wife, she is a passionate knowledgeable gardener & this 6’ high solid barrier has completely changed the appearance & aspect of the garden she has lovingly tended for nigh on 20 years.

All I’m looking for is a way to break the impact such a dramatic change has made. Thanks @robgul my wife likes this suggestion, she has had her head buried in her gardening books for the last couple of days one of which suggested using different styles of covering along the length of the fence rather than just one & ending up with another long solid surface.

I Imagine we will end up with some horizontal laths as per that design as it will also enable climbing plants to do just that. We have also been looking at larch interwoven panels these again would enable the plants to climb.
She would prefer to go for climbers as with such a narrow garden shrubs can quickly become too large & evasive.

Cheers all.
Be aware that you'll need a LOT of laths - and painting 2 coats on 3 sides was a task (obviously paint before fixing) - the laths (19 x 38) were the cheapest I could find in treated timber from a fencing merchant. We've had loads of positive comments about the fence, passers-by stop and look. Oh, and you'll need a LOT of staples in the gun (use staples not pins as they will hold better) - the upright battens were screwed to the existing fence for strength.
 

Benchwayze

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There’s nothing like a fence to stir up passion it seems.

Theres no rule, law or even standard about which side faces what, except in some very specific circumstances. There’s also a great deal of things you don’t have to do at all, like tell your neighbour you’re putting a fence up. Though polite consideration would normally suggest it’s done.

If they replaced a picket fence with 6’ panels it might suggest they want a bit more privacy, something they are plenty entitled too.

Aidan
True Aidan. I have seen old pallets used as a temporary repair, which hung around for years!

No, it wasn't me!

John
 

Sandyn

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If you have a dispute with a neighbour in certain circumstances, you have to disclose that when selling the house. I think if you have had written communication or made a formal complaint, but not certain about that. Some of these 'neighbours from hell' programs....it's scary how bad the disputes can get.
 

BillStan01

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Don't know what the fuss is about - looks very nice to me. You should see the state of my neighbour's fence and garden - looks like the Beverley hillbillies (sign of age)!
 

Nigel Burden

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That fence looks ok to me.

On the subject of the correct way that the fence should face, if I had replaced my fence the "correct" way around, it would have obstructed a shared main sewer man hole cover which is mainly in my neighbours garden, although the neighbour at the time informed me that the cover was well and truely rusted on, and that it would probably need dynamite to move it. Two neighbours later and it's covered with decking.

Nigel.
 

marcros

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That fence looks ok to me.

On the subject of the correct way that the fence should face, if I had replaced my fence the "correct" way around, it would have obstructed a shared main sewer man hole cover which is mainly in my neighbours garden, although the neighbour at the time informed me that the cover was well and truely rusted on, and that it would probably need dynamite to move it. Two neighbours later and it's covered with decking.

Nigel.
how?

if it is your fence, then the posts would be fully in your garden, and the boards on the boundary line. it cant obstruct anything in his garden which is part of the reasoning behind the "correct" way.
 

Nigel Burden

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how?

if it is your fence, then the posts would be fully in your garden, and the boards on the boundary line. it cant obstruct anything in his garden which is part of the reasoning behind the "correct" way.
The man hole cover protrudes about three inches across the boundary line into my garden.

Nigel.
 

J-G

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The man hole cover protrudes about three inches across the boundary line into my garden.

Nigel.
In that case there has been some 'migration' of the boundary in the past. No planning department would allow such a situation.
 

Blackswanwood

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In that case there has been some 'migration' of the boundary in the past. No planning department would allow such a situation.
Planning Departments don’t enforce or even consider boundaries. Drains, sewers and underground services are often shared by properties so it is entirely possible for a manhole cover to straddle a boundary.
 

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