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Doug B

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Our new neighbours have removed an old picket fence & replaced it with concrete posts, gravel boards & vertilap fence panels all with the back side facing us, I don’t have a problem with this as such it’s their boundary but & it’s a big but I hate the look of this type of fence particularly the back.

My question is Does anyone have any suggestions, links, photos etc of a way of hiding this monstrosity? As it’s 6’ high we intend to alter our planting but would like something to cover it in the spring rather than wait years for plants to grow. Ta
 

pcb1962

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AIUI you aren't allowed to attach anything to their fence or to paint it without their permission. There a very useful forum at www.gardenlaw.co.uk with a whole section on fences that you may find useful.
 

Sandyn

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you can get artificial ivy leaf fence screening, which is pretty naff looking, but might be better than what you have just now. I think the green windbreak would look better. Have big plants in pots to break up the outline perhaps where the concrete posts are. Have you a picture to see how bad it is?
 

Doug B

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How about green gardening windbreak while you're waiting for plants and such to grow. What direction does the fence face ? If South facing then a lovely wisteria or two would look stunning.
East north East
 

marcros

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There’s 11 panels
That is a long fence, I have just put in 9 so I can picture it. I am not sure that most of the screening options will look much better over 20 odd metres.
 

yetloh

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Your only real option is to grow plants that will screen it. You could, of course, ask your neighbours if they are happy for you to attach anchors to it that will allow you to grow climbers, in which case you have plenty of lovely options - but avoid anything too rampant and ivy which can force panels apart. Oherwise it's shrubs or hedging, still plenty of choice but they take more space.
 

Droogs

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ask if its ok to put window boxes on it and then plant passionitas, they grow quick and hang down to cover the fence
 

Jonzjob

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I would suggest that the first thing would be to talk to them, tell them of your feelings, nicely of course, and as said above ask if it's OK to fix things to it. If they can understand your feelings they may well be quite willing to help?
 

Tris

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If your neighbours are amenable you could use post fix brackets to attach wires along the fence and then plant some clematis. Go for the later flowering types which will cover a panel each, or clematis 'armandii' which is evergreen and will go a bit further. Just don't plant a Montana clematis or it will pull the fence apart.
 

Doug B

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Thanks for the replies.
I took a photo this morning

52BA1C88-8C2D-4C29-9A07-F29ACECFEDEA.jpeg


I don’t know if you can tell from the photo but the timber back rails are barely 3/4” thick :oops: it really is the cheapest fencing I think I’ve seen so I also now have my doubts about about the quality of the concrete posts & boards as I’ve seen these degrade rapidly before.

With this in mind I’m unwilling to fix anything to it in case I open myself up to liability should, as certainly looks likely with the panels, they fall to picecs in quick time & I’m blamed for premature failure due to anything I’ve fixed to it.
 

marcros

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I have seen far worse and far cheaper than those. Our front fence is far lower quality and the only parts that have failed are the top capping (loose piece) and the bits that contact the soil (no gravel board). They have been in the 10 years that we have lived here but are a project for the coming spring because the wooden posts have rotted. I don't know about the concrete posts and if/how they degrade. The panels will get wet and dry out but will generally do so without too much hassle. Even my antique ones haven't rotted in the areas where they can dry out and get the wind around them.

If I were you, noting your concerns about fixing to the fence, I would put up with it for 12-24 months whilst your planting grows up. Some freestanding structures for plants to grow up will take the eye away, and things like sweet peas will grow quickly enough next year whilst slower stuff catches up. You could even put up some posts and wires within your side to 4 or 5ft and start to train some stuff along it. Clematis, passiflora, honeysuckle spring to mind but I don't know about your soil, shade or what direction they like to face.

At least they are bow topped panels. New fences always look a bit stark but you will stop noticing so much after a short while. My new one needs painting but it is too cold for the barn paint to adhere (apparently) so it is having to wait. I have already stopped being annoyed by the orange colour after a month.
 

Trextr7monkey

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What about a few willow hurdles which could have stuff growing over them quickly and a few obelisks also from willow to distract the eyes from the regularity of the panels?
 

Rorschach

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I must be in the minority here, I think that looks alright, certainly could be a lot worse.

I would put my own fence in, any planting could cause damage and if it's as cheap and nasty as you say then you could cause yourself a massive headache.
 
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