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Con? Or genuine?

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Digit

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With that row of sockets he should plug one in each socket and the utility company will owe him!

Roy.
 

Benchwayze

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monkeybiter":348zi833 said:
Probably it is a dangerous con, but I can't help thinking that the power companies have a vested interest and they would say that wouldn't they?

Just as the oil companies would scupper any large scale plans for cars to be run on Hydrogen, which is perfectly feasible, if somewhat dangerous at present.

John
 

monkeybiter

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While having the quick look around to get those links I saw enough other stuff to think there probably is something in it, just with less impressive savings.
 

Digit

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The first hydrogen powered cars are apprently going on sale in about 2 years John.
One newspaper described the potential sales as a 'Boom!' Many a true word etc.

Roy.
 

Benchwayze

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Jonzjob":2oa8vbhj said:
I can't see trading standards coming out with a bunch of porkies to satisfy the power companies though.
I can Jon. There was an old saying in the RN about 'The hand that pineappled the Coxswain ran the ship.' So maybe the promise of funding works wonders. But then I am a Conspiracy theorist, on some subjects! 8)

As for hydrogen powered cars, well I am quite sure the Petrol Companies won't like that one bit, and I can't see them lying down without a fight.

I read somewhere that a lone inventor in the states had contrived a way of extracting hydrogen from water, and was running his car that way. probably S an Urban Myth!

John :D
 

Digit

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Extracting Hydrogen from water isn't a problem, just expensive, but powering a car on it also not as simple as some think.

Roy.
 

Digit

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The only way that I can see is that it restricts the power available to the fridge motor by rapid switching, if so then the compressor would take longer to achieve a given temp drop, thus the power required to achieve a given temp fall would be basically the same.

Roy.
 

RogerS

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Digit":j4ypu0gu said:
The only way that I can see is that it restricts the power available to the fridge motor by rapid switching, if so then the compressor would take longer to achieve a given temp drop, thus the power required to achieve a given temp fall would be basically the same.

Roy.
That is a very good explanation, Roy, as to why it is a con. Comes down to basic physics at the end of the day. To drop the temperature in a fridge by x degrees takes a certain known amount of energy. It is not going to change.. that energy has to come from the electricity supply. So either take 1kw for 1 hour or a 200w load for five hours. You've still consumed 1KWh.

QED...con.
 

Digit

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There are other ways in theory, such as changing the waveform of the supply, but in a unit of that size the usuable power would be small. I noted with interest that the example uses a small fridge, motor size? 100 watts perhaps?

Roy.
 

JakeS

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Also bear in mind that a fridge probably has pretty relaxed power requirements, and not getting so much supply probably just means it doesn't cool so much.

On the other hand, I know I've had a computer die in the past simply because of fluctuations in the incoming power supply - I think computer hardware is a little more resilient to that kind of thing these days, but I wonder how well one would last behind one of these things!
 

SketchUp Guru

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I'd be skeptical, too.

Over here incoming residential electrical service is 240V. It is split out into two busses of 120V each but for some devices like electric clothes dryers, electric water heaters and electric stoves, 240V is used. Every once in awhile some bright bulb will suggest that it would be cheaper to run their large power tools on 240V because the current draw is only half of the current draw at 120V. This will get a lot of folks going. It would be great if the power company charged for Amps but they don't. They charge for Watts.

These devices that claim to reduce power consumption don't show the entire picture and manage to sucker a lot of people in. The people who sell these things as well as those who sell magnets to put on your car's fuel line are just preying on people who are willing to be separated from their money.
 

OLD

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Its connected in parallel so how can it reduce the current drawn does not make sense.
 

Digit

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I'm guessing that the extension lead is, shall we say, non-standard? Otherwise why use an extension lead?
From that demo we don't even know that the fridge keeps running once that unit is plugged in.

Roy.
 

RogerS

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Ahh..I know how it works. The French electrons go down one wire and the English electrons go down the other wire...thus saving 50% of your electricity. Clever!
 
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