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"Chisel Sharpening with Harrelson Stanley" Anyone

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Anonymous

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Hi,

Has anyone viewed the "Chisel Sharpening with Harrelson Stanley" DVD on sale at Shapton's?

I watched the preview and it's just a "hello, there" intro. Not enough to tell if it's worth the postage let anlone the price.
 

MikeW

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Hi T,

I have not seen the DVD, but have helped to set up for and watched a demonstration at a local Woodcraft store. My understanding is that the DVD goes into more detail than that demonstration.

It was after the demonstration that I replaced 2 of my King stones that were wore out with the Shaptons. Well, and after using them there at the demonstration alongside a King stone.
 

Brent

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I've seen the DVD and it is worth watching.His approach to sharpening is a bit like David Charlesworth,in that they both are meticulous about it.

It is a bit of a sales promo for Shapton stones,but,there is a lot of good info there.I've found that I've picked up something new every time I've watched someone else sharpen or watched a sharpening video.

Don't expect any earth shattering secrets or a new and better way to sharpen,but it is definately worth watching.

Brent
 
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Anonymous

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Hehheh. Nope, but at my level of experience, any secret is earth-shattering! The sum total of my past sharpening experience is using the thing with steel discs to touch up kitchen knives :)

I bought my first house a few years ago and vowed to never again buy a "throwaway" tool. Now I have a nice set of dull chisels that need sharpening. I don't mind sending a TS blade out for sharpening, but the chisels are something I know that I could do, I just don't have any clue at all as to how.

I guess I know what to ask for for Father's Day, eh?
 

MikeW

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Hi T,

Personally, if I were in need of sharpening instruction, I would purchase (or suggest as a FD present) either Leonard Lee's book (first choice) or Lie-Nielsen's book on sharpening.

Maybe even a close-to-you forum member has a copy they can lend you? Maybe even have a go sharpening just one chisel with them would put you on the right track?
 

Brent

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T,

Mike's suggestions on books are great.Between the 2 you'll get all the info you need.Lee's book is strong on technique,Lie-Nielsen's is strong on equipement.

But.......there's nothing like watching it done.Harrelson's video would be a great starting place if you have no experience in sharpening.He explains everything simply and in great detail,not just the how,but also the why.All his techniques will work on any waterstone,not just shaptons.

Brent
 
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Anonymous

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There have been a few interations of this thing, So I am not sure which one you are thinking of. I got one when I was at the Plane Making seminar, and it is pretty good. I think it is a little dull. But then sharpening is a little dull.

To really prosper in hand woodworking, it helps to have the ability to quickly sharpen tools by hand, without reference to jigs. This is a skill like woodworking itself, and Stanley goes into the actual biomechanics of doing it.

There are a million ways to jig sharpening, I once suffered through a long demonstration by the Toshio saw guy in Seattle, suffered, because I was late for a palne, and he wouldn't stop. He had an endless series of trick, almost none of which I had ever heard before. But freehand sharpening is rarely described, and is possibly the single most important skill in woodworking.
 

bugbear

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To really prosper in hand woodworking, it helps to have the ability to quickly sharpen tools by hand, without reference to jigs.
You're right. But at the risk of restarting a well know flame war, jig sharpening is a very good way for the beginner or intermittent woodworker (which is a lot of us hobbyists) to get good edges.

BugBear (who doesn't spend enough time in the shop to keep all his skills touched up)
 
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Anonymous

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bugbear":3hcuk8gk said:
To really prosper in hand woodworking, it helps to have the ability to quickly sharpen tools by hand, without reference to jigs.
You're right. But at the risk of restarting a well know flame war, jig sharpening is a very good way for the beginner or intermittent woodworker (which is a lot of us hobbyists) to get good edges.
I want to learn to do it by hand. I had a woodshop teacher who did it that way some 40 years back. I'd rather spend the money on wood or tools than pre-built jigs.

Woodworking is my hobby and I'm doing it for fun. I guess it's Zen sort of thing with me.. If it takes me an hour to do something, then it does, and since I'm having fun at it, then it's a well spent hour :)
 
A

Anonymous

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If a person wanted to, they could proceed as I think many experts do: Sharpen by hand till you round it over, and then jig it up. The only difference would be the time between re-truings.

One of the issues I have with the idea one needs a jig for sharpening is that the chisel in use is no great bargain either. So does one jig it in use. Before one knows it the work and the rate of learning are just crawling along.

By the way, you can jig the blade without owning a jig.

I'm not anti-jig. All hand tools are jigs, or as I think of it "molds", for something. Take the most basic tool like a chisel or axe, there are aspects about each tool that determines how it will cut. Like are the edges straight or are they curved. Do they cut away from a bevel, or align with a surface. Lots of individual tendencies

That's why external jigs can be an annoyance, they presume that the tool is not being used correctly. They are often designed to fight the tool's natural behavior, that needs to be harnessed. And sometimes the fight is necessary because one is doing something unusual, or simply doesn't own the full kit of tools (modest though the really necessary items are).
 
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Anonymous

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The Thief -

If you haven't gotten hold of this dvd yet, and your name isn't a reflection of your behavior, I'll be happy to send and lend you a copy. PM me.

Mark
 
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