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Cautionary Tale

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Anonymous

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Chatting to a friend yesterday, He told me that he walked back into his workshop last week only to find smoke coming from his dust extractor.
It seemed he had been cutting some old timber with a not too-sharp circular saw blade. The timber was thicker than the depth of cut so had to cut from both sides. This meant he did'nt notice any burning during cutting.
Needless to say bags etc were left out in the rain overnight.
A very lucky escape as the workshop is joined to his home.
It will certainly change my rather sloppy attitude to sawdust.
 

matt

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Reminds me of the warnings about static sparks (possible with the use of plastic tubing) in a dust extractor full of dust. Apprantly it makes a good bomb, complete with a secondary explosion if the air in the workshop is laden with dust too.
 

Adam

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matt":1b79dxk1 said:
Reminds me of the warnings about static sparks (possible with the use of plastic tubing) in a dust extractor full of dust. Apprantly it makes a good bomb, complete with a secondary explosion if the air in the workshop is laden with dust too.
Hmm, I've read this, but have seen several well documented arguments that it simply isn't possible. (in regular workshops). And that its a bit of a myth for plastic piping as well. Dunno, I'd be interested to know if its been proven properly one way or the other?

Adam
 

Bean

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MMmm The possibility for a static build up is there, this can simply be overcome by running a bare copper wire through the pipe and connecting to earth.


Bean
 

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