Carpet Tiles in a Workshop - Thoughts (Good or Bad Idea?)

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Dynamite

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Hull, England, UK
Hi Everyone, I've aquired some virtually new, in really good condition carpet tiles. They are good hard wearing ones, not fluffy domestic type. I dont want to spend a fortune on the rubber type interlocking ones either, these are free.

I have seen a video by stumpy nubs about the benefits of carpet tiles in woodworking shops and I thought it was a cracking idea. They keep the dust down and are good on your feet for standing on and it obviously has real benefits in winter. Obviously you need to hoover rather than sweep which isn't an issue for me either and I definitely don't want to be standing on hard cold concrete especially during winter. If I did proceed, I intend to pva seal the concrete floor first and then glue the tiles down with adhesive. My shop is about 5mts x 3mts (Its basically a domestic garage with an apex roof).

I am really struggling to make a decision though. I am sat looking at the tiles and my concrete floor wondering if I would be doing the right thing.

I'm interested to gather what everyones thoughts are on this, especially if anyone has tried it and whether it was a success or a failure.

Thanks You... Rob
 
I have found carpet offcuts really useful,if a tool or a nearly finished piece of work should fall off the bench, the damage is minimised.A bit of insulation between your feet and a concrete floor can also make time in the workshop a bit more pleasant in the colder months.I wouldn't cover the whole floor with carpet as it can be a big challenge to totally clean the floor prior to painting or varnishing a piece.
 
good idea, I had a job lot from an old office block years ago. Used in kitchen for the simple reason they are hard wearing and easy to lay. Twenty years on still going stong, loads of wood dust brought in on workboots from my garage, no match for the henry! Mine, heuga, will also take a jet wash. When I move to a new home I wll adopt your plan. Current workshop cavity construction, slab fully membraned between blinding sand, the same will be at new home. Mine 500mm sq, heavy, stay put and easy to pick up, many a machine moved across on wheeled dolly, and out into garden from kitchen, with no issues.
 
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Has the floor a damp proof membrane? If not I wouldn’t put anything that can seal moisture in the floor.
For comfort, machinist always had duct boards, laths simple screwed or nailed with boas between to braces that lifted them off the floor, whilst the boards allowed saw dust etc to drop through whilst keeping legs ‘fresh’ as each lath bends slightly differently making you use different muscles in your legs and feet.
 
There are 2 disadvantages imo 1 moving anything heavy is actually quite difficult 2 they will trap large amounts of sawdust and especially fine dust which when hoovering will become airborne again .it’s also a lot easier to sweep a hard floor than hoover a carpet. Specially designed mats are available for standing on for long periods and these can just be rolled up and shook outside to clean ..
 
I use those interlocking foam mat squares. In front of the bench, by the lathe and the drill. Just the places where I spend time standing. Light and easy to move about and can be taken out and hosed down. I used to have some of that heavy duty industrial rubber mat but it was heavy to drag around. Not a good idea to have wall to wall mats as thats a pain to keep clean and gets in the way of moving machines around.
Amazon Basics Foam Interlocking Exercise Gym Floor Mat Tiles - Pack of 6, 60.96 x 60.96 x 1.27 CM, Grey : Amazon.com.au: Sports, Fitness & Outdoors
Regards
John
 
I use those interlocking foam mat squares. In front of the bench, by the lathe and the drill. Just the places where I spend time standing. Light and easy to move about and can be taken out and hosed down. I used to have some of that heavy duty industrial rubber mat but it was heavy to drag around. Not a good idea to have wall to wall mats as thats a pain to keep clean and gets in the way of moving machines around.
Amazon Basics Foam Interlocking Exercise Gym Floor Mat Tiles - Pack of 6, 60.96 x 60.96 x 1.27 CM, Grey : Amazon.com.au: Sports, Fitness & Outdoors
Regards
John
I have something very similar in my workshop on top of a concret floor.
Such a great quality of life improvement, because it's black and easy to clean I find I keep it cleaner than when it was just concrete.
I haven't stuck them down to the floor and they've not moved, which is good cos it means when I get new equipment or just want to move something around I can easily take them up and move them.
 
The one huge advantage is that if you drop say a router cutter it will not get damaged like onto a hard floor but you will need a good hoover as I think the sawdust will be fun. Also nice to stand on in colder months so for nothing can you really say no as you cannot lose.
 
I have something very similar in my workshop on top of a concret floor.
Such a great quality of life improvement, because it's black and easy to clean I find I keep it cleaner than when it was just concrete.
I haven't stuck them down to the floor and they've not moved, which is good cos it means when I get new equipment or just want to move something around I can easily take them up and move them.
Why not put them down upside down, then u get the cushioning and a smooth surface easy to hoover…..
 
If you have stuff on casters, then I would empty out what you can, lay rolls of 5 or 10mm closed cell dense foam, with adhesive side up wall to wall. The lay thr tiles rubber side down and they'll stick to the foam fantasticall..

I think getting it laid wall to wall is best option. If you only do in the open walk space, then moving anything is a pain.
 
The office type which are not fluffy and are heavy can trap sawdust which is hard to get up even with a vacuum. If your floor is reasonably flat I would try them first without glue before committing ,I think they are often laid without I've never had any difficulty lifting them.
 
Where is your workshop in relation to the house? The garden outside my shed turns into a swamp during bad winters / springs I have to change shoes when I go inside!!

As well as stuff you walk in - think about spills of paint, glue, white spirit, tea and coffee (no matter where I put my mug something will knock into it)
 
If you are set on using carpet tiles then I would not glue them down. There is no need to and in fact I have never seen them glued down. Spill something as is likely to happen then just whip up the affected tiles for a wash and replace when dry. Most office buildings use them and they are usually not glued down. Gives them the flexibility of rearranging things when required.
Regards
John
 
Recently moved. The garage which is being upgraded to a workshop has a slab concrete floor which has been tamped but is not smooth.

Size constraints mean many machine are/will be mounted on castors - bandsaw, plane, thicknesser etc to enable long stock to be processed. The slab finish means the castors do not run smoothly. Also as noted above concrete is fairly unforgiving on feet and dropped tools.

I had planned (after a bit of research) to go with interlocking vinyl tiles - the following seem fit for purpose, should provide a smooth hardwearing surface and relatively cheap TILES .

Any opinions on this would be welcomed - I had not considered carpet tiles due to dust and spills but may be a worthwhile alternative.
 
Hi Everyone, I've aquired some virtually new, in really good condition carpet tiles. They are good hard wearing ones, not fluffy domestic type. I dont want to spend a fortune on the rubber type interlocking ones either, these are free.

I have seen a video by stumpy nubs about the benefits of carpet tiles in woodworking shops and I thought it was a cracking idea. They keep the dust down and are good on your feet for standing on and it obviously has real benefits in winter. Obviously you need to hoover rather than sweep which isn't an issue for me either and I definitely don't want to be standing on hard cold concrete especially during winter. If I did proceed, I intend to pva seal the concrete floor first and then glue the tiles down with adhesive. My shop is about 5mts x 3mts (Its basically a domestic garage with an apex roof).

I am really struggling to make a decision though. I am sat looking at the tiles and my concrete floor wondering if I would be doing the right thing.

I'm interested to gather what everyones thoughts are on this, especially if anyone has tried it and whether it was a success or a failure.

Thanks You... Rob
I put our old lounge axminster carpet down in my new workshop on a brushed concrete floor 15 years ago as somewhere to put it whilst waiting until I had my next ski and it’s still there I don’t sweep it I made a plywood squeegee to push the shavings in a corner to pick up works well (But I dread removing it now)
 
Hi Everyone, I've aquired some virtually new, in really good condition carpet tiles. They are good hard wearing ones, not fluffy domestic type. I dont want to spend a fortune on the rubber type interlocking ones either, these are free.

I have seen a video by stumpy nubs about the benefits of carpet tiles in woodworking shops and I thought it was a cracking idea. They keep the dust down and are good on your feet for standing on and it obviously has real benefits in winter. Obviously you need to hoover rather than sweep which isn't an issue for me either and I definitely don't want to be standing on hard cold concrete especially during winter. If I did proceed, I intend to pva seal the concrete floor first and then glue the tiles down with adhesive. My shop is about 5mts x 3mts (Its basically a domestic garage with an apex roof).

I am really struggling to make a decision though. I am sat looking at the tiles and my concrete floor wondering if I would be doing the right thing.

I'm interested to gather what everyones thoughts are on this, especially if anyone has tried it and whether it was a success or a failure.

Thanks You... Rob
I would not glue down, the short pile heuga ones I have, commercial grade, are heavy enough and will blend to floor shape, within reason. Also any spills, can easilty be jets washed out. Plenty on ebay cheap, worth getting some spare.
 
I’m seven years in and love them. No glue underneath. They hardly ever move. I bought a house that had them in the garage already. I intended to change them and now wouldn’t want to be without them. I have some heavy machines that I can move on them. Dust isn’t an issue and they are much nicer in winter underfoot.
 
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