Bitumastic or asphalt flooring and/or cheaper options

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

This site may earn a commission from merchant affiliate links, including eBay, Amazon, and others.

Jacob

New Luddism. Awake and resist!
Joined
7 Jul 2010
Messages
29,161
Reaction score
5,606
Location
Derbyshire
What's the difference and which is best for workshop floor over existing concrete slab?
What about just laying Polythene DPM with battens and chipboard on top?
 
I think you need to be clear on what you're trying to achieve. If you're just looking to 'seal' the bare concrete to prevent dust/erosion then some kind of floor paint would be all you need. As far as being kind to your feet, maybe some kind of rubber matting would be a cost-effective option - including some that is sold for horse stabling.

A two part epoxy paint might be overkill, but would be a good option e.g. https://www.watco.co.uk/products/epoxy-resin-floor-paint

https://www.watco.co.uk/products/watco-fluted-rubber-mat
https://www.horsematshop.co.uk/product-category/equine/stable-floors/
 
I have 18 mm stable matting with a fine diamond pattern, in 6' X 4' sheets. Heavy but manageable to lay singlehanded and cuts with a sharp Stanley knife. Once laid, heavy enough not to want to move. I used quattrorubberandresin.co.uk because they were near enough to collect, rather than have a hefty delivery charge. Comfortable, warm and forgiving for dropped tools.
 
In my experience, stable mats smooth out a rough agricultural concrete floor, i.e. mostly level to within 5mm and some bigger holes or gouges. In my case, damp was not an issue as already inside a building and tested by laying a plastic sheet for several weeks with no moisture showing underneath.
 
In my experience, stable mats smooth out a rough agricultural concrete floor, i.e. mostly level to within 5mm and some bigger holes or gouges. In my case, damp was not an issue as already inside a building and tested by laying a plastic sheet for several weeks with no moisture showing underneath.
Good idea the plastic test sheet I'll try that ta.
Looking at stable mats for instant solution. Are they rigid enough for a heavy machine 400kg to be wheeled over (ocasionally) on its two castors?
 
Those stable mats are really solid and incredibly heavy, machinery doesn’t normally have small points on footprints so should be ok. Once had a Bitumen floor poured, wonderful smell for a few days! Should be fine with equipment on it but a bit concrete like for standing on. The plastic sheet test is good and will show up damp overnight.
I have had T&G OSB 2x8 x18mm roofing sheets with 2/3 coats of water based varnish as my workshop floor for a lot of years now still good and as far as I’m concerned it’s the perfect floor.
Ian
 
Damp proof and smooth surface suitable for woodwork shop.

25mm polystyrene, DPM (1200g polythene), T&G chipboard with joints glued.

Your feet will thank you. Your chillblains will thank you.

You would have to give the machine a test drive and use a 1mm or 1.5mm steel sheet if it causes indentations. It all depends on how wide the wheels are.
 
25mm polystyrene, DPM (1200g polythene), T&G chipboard with joints glued.

Your feet will thank you. Your chillblains will thank you.

You would have to give the machine a test drive and use a 1mm or 1.5mm steel sheet if it causes indentations. It all depends on how wide the wheels are.
No battens etc under the chipboard? I'd wonder about local loads under heavy things.
My combi OK on chipboard, drop down castors about 30mm wide.
 
What's the difference and which is best for workshop floor over existing concrete slab?
What about just laying Polythene DPM with battens and chipboard on top?
We had asphalt installed over the top of direct to earth quarry tiles in a previous house. It was quick to have installed and provides a totally impermeable surface. However, you do need to be aware that despite feeling like a hard surface, it does remain slightly fluid, so heavy items do leave dents over time. You’ll need to have a finish layer on top of it. I’ve used the pvc tiles in my workshop, which are great
 
No battens etc under the chipboard?

I think battens would defeat the purpose of the floating floor. As above, with the comments on asphalt being indented, some spreader plates under severe point loads (either from fixed machines or narrow castors when moving them) would be prudent.

A common polystyrene is Jabfloor. It comes in various compressive strengths. The technical data sheet is here (https://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/0...sulation-Technical-Datasheet.pdf?v=1595262017). The number after the product name is the strength in kPA of KN/m^2. Standard builders merchant stuff for domestic floors is Jabfloor 70. At 1% compression, it is rated for 2 tonnes (2000kg) per square metre. The diaphragm/membrane action of the glued T&G chipboard will help to distribute loads. As above, the challenge is to operate in a way so as to prevent local damage from point loads.
 
I poured Screwfix/Mapei self levelling SLC over my rough concrete floor, very thin layer. Some give/flex, much more comfortable to walk/stand on, and easier to move heavy machinery.

Very easy to do (with a spiked roller).
 
Moved into my flat over 20 years ago to find the floors peppered with hundreds of indents , floor is asphalt and in the hot weather anything heavy with small wheels or legs sinks into it -thank for laminate floors..
 
Jacob, I had a concrete slab floor, cracked and subsided in one corner (hence the cracks). I could not be sure about Damp Course, so...I dry/slightly damp mixed some sand and cement, levelled things up, let it dry. Laid 10mm sand, followed by a 1200 guage D.P.M., then 50mm Celulite, sorry, Celotex, then glued-at-the-joins 19mm chipboard to form a floating floor. I had to 'edge' it with hardwood at rhe door sill - 8' wide - to protect the chipboard edge.
I have a Wadkin AGS10 sitting on it, along with a heavy bench, planer/thicknesser, floor-mounted drill press, bandsaw, two DX's, a Jet 1221 lathe on its stand and am ust about to drag in a quarter-ton mortiser. No issues whatsoever on settlement, dents, sagging, yada. yada. The construction allows the weight to be distributed over a wide area. The wooden floor is warm and comfortable to the tootsies, edge-friendly to dropped sharp tools.

Sam
 
The wooden floor is warm and comfortable to the tootsies, edge-friendly to dropped sharp tools.

Also, with that style of construction, if you had a 2 tonne metal lathe, you can holesaw neatly through it with a 110mm holesaw, put in an offcut of soil pipe to seal the cut edge and cast a concrete cylinder for the foot of the machine to sit on.
 
Also, with that style of construction, if you had a 2 tonne metal lathe, you can holesaw neatly through it with a 110mm holesaw, put in an offcut of soil pipe to seal the cut edge and cast a concrete cylinder for the foot of the machine to sit on.
At first I thought, What?? But actually for hugely heavy equipment that’s a good idea.
 

Latest posts

Back
Top