Flooring options for existing workshop

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supertom44

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I'm looking to renovate my workshop this year, one of the things I want to improve is the flooring.

My workshop is based in my garage and it has an uneven concrete floor, I've previously been using some padded flooring tiles which are fine until I need to more things around, they don't play well with casters.

The issue I have is I need something that I can apply/install in sections as I don't have anywhere I can move all my machinery too while installing.

The two options I can think of at the moment are:
- A wooden flooring, using a construction lumber frame with a plywood top layer. Easy to install, shouldn't be too expensive, unsure how it would handle heavy equipment.
- Using temporary wooden frame to pour concrete or epoxy in sections. More durable than the above, probably more expensive and a bit of hassle to do.

Was wondering if anyone had any alternatives or suggestions on the above methods.

Cheers.
 
It does depend upon how uneven but I use a mix of chipboard sheet and another area of second hand bitumen backed floor tiles.
All straight down on the concrete, no problem moving anything and acts as a damp barrier.
Cheers, Andy
 
Fill in the worst of the hollows with self levelling compound then t&g OSB, I’ve had big cast iron on mine for a lot of years now.
 
I don’t think you will like this reply but I’m only talking from experience. Find a way to store your tools and machinery even if you have to hire a large marquee and store it in the garden, completely sweep out the garage and inspect the whole floor . Fill any deep voids or badly damaged areas and seal once dry , use a latex self levelling compound and follow the instructions including priming the existing floor if required. Ventilate the garage while it sets as much as possible. Once completely dry seal with an appropriate sealer ( if reqd ) then as above use osb, chipboard, or even plywood-lay as a floating floor or fix with flexible silicone. This way is more work but it’s a better solution imho as you will have a complete floor in one piece not several pieces patched together that could break up at a later date . You will be surprised what you find once it’s empty and any bad areas can then be addressed . Machines glide over flat surfaces assuming you have wheels on them so any future layout changes will be a lot easier. Likewise if you have any damp issues or find any these can also be addressed..
 
I don’t think you will like this reply but I’m only talking from experience. Find a way to store your tools and machinery even if you have to hire a large marquee and store it in the garden, completely sweep out the garage and inspect the whole floor . Fill any deep voids or badly damaged areas and seal once dry , use a latex self levelling compound and follow the instructions including priming the existing floor if required. Ventilate the garage while it sets as much as possible. Once completely dry seal with an appropriate sealer ( if reqd ) then as above use osb, chipboard, or even plywood-lay as a floating floor or fix with flexible silicone. This way is more work but it’s a better solution imho as you will have a complete floor in one piece not several pieces patched together that could break up at a later date . You will be surprised what you find once it’s empty and any bad areas can then be addressed . Machines glide over flat surfaces assuming you have wheels on them so any future layout changes will be a lot easier. Likewise if you have any damp issues or find any these can also be addressed..
I'd love to be able to do that, but I can't think of anyway or anywhere to store the machinery.
The only access to the garden is through a single narrow doorway.
It might be possible if I dismantle my table saw, I'd have to take some measurements.
 
Fill in the worst of the hollows with self levelling compound then t&g OSB, I’ve had big cast iron on mine for a lot of years now.
Do you have the OSB lying directly on top of the concrete?
For some reason I had it in my mind I'd need to lay it on studs, not sure where I got that from though.
If it can lay flat on the concrete, assuming I fill the worst gaps, then put down a vapour barrier, this might be way I go.
 
I have used 18 mm thick rubber stable mats directly onto concrete in an old cattle barn. They are 6’ X 4’ each so plenty of friction to stop them moving once down. They cope with an uneven floor, rolled concrete with undulations and the occasional larger defect. A bit of a handful to lay single handed for someone well over retirement age but doable.
I did not use self levelling compound and do not regret this. Cost less than £1000 for 44 sq m, 4 months ago. Warm underfoot and enough give to be kind to dropped tools. Happy to provide more info if required.
 
I'd love to be able to do that, but I can't think of anyway or anywhere to store the machinery.
The only access to the garden is through a single narrow doorway.
It might be possible if I dismantle my table saw, I'd have to take some measurements.
So I’m assuming everything went into the garage through the up and over door or similar, i understand your position but it will be worth the effort if you could achieve this . How big is your saw ? And is that the largest machine you have ? And how much weight are we looking at ? Thanks
 
Bingy man’s quite right of course, I did a garage floor once and levelled of half at a time, just put down a strip of wood, pour up to it, remove the wood when it’s dry and then pour the other half. You may with planning get some boards down after the first lot is dry then move all your gear onto that. Well worth it after it’s all done.
Yes to the insulation layer as well.
To your question about OSB on concrete, sorry that was a different floor, my OSB was over joists. Not sure about it’s use on concrete. But somebody will know!
 
Personally I would empty the garage and make a job of it.Prime the floor with SBR then a decent self levelling compound.
When I did my garage floor I lifted everything into the garden and covered it up well while I did it.

An alternative, which I did in the past during a commercial workshop move was to hire a self storage container for a couple of weeks to put gear in.They usually charge per week.I.e pay for a month but get refunded the full weeks you don't use it.
 
Having just come out the back of a workshop renovation, i echo the opinion of BucksDad - a DPM, 25mm PIR, VCL then 22mm P5 chipboard.

Our situations were near identical, my floor was pretty unlevel (~30mm undulations), and i had to play musical machines for the 7 weeks it took me (nowhere else they could go).

I ended up doing the floor in two stages, one at 65% length, move everything, then finish off the other side. My heaviest machine is about 180Kg, so the transition was a challenge, but was well worth it. The result is excellent - it feels nice underfoot and the workshop climate is magnitudes better.

My only tip would be to consider your floorboard pattern - try to bridge the high-low transitions and avoid joins there. This made life slightly more complicated and required me to router T&G profiles on some edges to ensure robust joints..

I chose this method because it was cheaper, faster - and ceiling height was limited (i wanted no less than 2.4m everywhere).

Good luck!
 
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Just to clarify my original post I would not use chipboard or osb directly onto concrete hence my advice to seal the floor once dry - however the advice below from @BucksDad is even better . Also @Cabinetman says he did this but in 2 halves is a decent compromise. @Rewby suggestion of hiring a storage container is also worth considering depending on the weight of the t/saw and any other large machines. You will thank yourself later when it’s done so do it right , do it once 🤗🤗
 
@OP. You say you have an 'uneven' concrete floor. If that means it's basically level but an uneven, ridged surface, PIR and OSB (not chipboard) will be fine. If there are small holes or depressions, these can be filled. Raised areas or bumps are harder to resolve - if small grind them off, but if too large in area, screeding the whole floor may be the best option.
 
I used the following garage floor tiles and have been very pleased with them. They are small enough to install with stuff in the workshop, while also being hard to enable things to be moved around on top of them. They also provide a liquid barrier to allow spills to be seen and mopped up. My floor was relatively level to start with but was by no means perfect.
https://www.garagefloortilecompany.com/collections/interlocking-floor-tiles/products/x-joint-blue
Wow their price has gone up a lot since I looked at them last year. I was going to use these for my garage. Might reconsider now
 
Another vote for the garagefloortilecompany. Really easy to install and if you did end up relaying your floor you could reuse them. They were also very helpful when I did mine so it might be worth giving them a call.
 
But the op states he has previously used padded tiles but these aren’t suitable for moving his machinery around . Padded tiles are fine if everything stays in situ but a nightmare when trying to move anything large and heavy..
 

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