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Alcove units

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thomasbush91

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Im a carpenter (only been one for 4 years now) had a career change from the armed forces, recently ive decided to do alot more of my own work for clients - i prefer more second fix base work.

At the moment ive got a load of alcove units lined up for several customers, but i still havent found the best way to design and make them, alot of lads i know leave the internal of the unit as the existing and just use finish timber to make the frame and shelves meaning the carpet/flooring/skirting etc is seen once the unit is opened, im really not into this design and most of my clients request the whole unit to be made.

Becuase of my inexperience in cabinetry i really struggle with things like overlay and how blum hinges fit once ive made my face frame. (I use simple butt hinges)

I cant seem to find a guide of a intricate alcove build or something that i am aiming for in terms of what i would like to provide for my customers.

If anybody knows of anything or a guide or plan you can buy i would greatly appreciate it.

Many thanks Tom
 

Mrs C

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Have a look at Peter Millard’s YouTube channel, he has video’d a number of these and all sorts of other useful stuff
 

sammy.se

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Another very useful and practical channel for this is Gid Joiner.

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RobinBHM

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If anybody knows of anything or a guide or plan you can buy i would greatly appreciate it
The pro way is to build a carcase with a front frame.

Ive tried various ways but settled on the simplest method as:

18mm mfc (melamine faced chipboard) for the carcase.

Screw the carcase together with confirmat screws.

Make a face frame using either screws and plugging holes or a domino.

Make internal dimension of face frame 2mm smaller on sides and bottom than carcase.

Use small battens to screw face frame to carcase. Make battens thin so once fitted the face frame is 10mm bigger

Use 9mm mdf for side cheeks, butt upto rear of projecting face frame, scribe to wall.

I would strongly recommend doing elevation drawings. Start with drawing your finished fitted unit, showing face frame and doors.

Apply dimensions to your face frame and use these dims as your datum to work out carcase sizes and doors.

I find doing a side view, drawing on the floor, ceiling and floor. Add your skirting and cornice. Then draw on the face frame (all end sections). Position the face frame so you will see about 30mm or so of it above / below the skirting / cornice.

You can then draw your position for carcase bottom and top.

Tip: do a full size rod of the face frame and mark all of your carcase ( Imagine the carcase in front of you, I put an arrow at the top and mark it TOP L/R TOP R/H).

Ive run a joinery shop for years and the vast majority of errors are due to poor or non existing marking out. 15mins spent doing methodical marking out will reduce cutting and assembly errors by 90%.

Ive found a B pencil for writing on components and an HB or H ideal for line marking.
 

sammy.se

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Hi Robin, that's some good advice. Can you explain more, or show a picture, regarding the batons and the face frame? I'm not sure I understand what you mean...

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