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Adhesive/sealer for water rower tank - any advice?

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McAldo

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Sorry if this is a bit of a random question.
I own a waterrower, a kind of rowing machine which uses a paddle in a water tank to create resistance.
The water tank started leaking today, after many years of usage.
It is basically made up of two halves which lock together. The junction between them is around 1mm wide and would need to be filled with a sealant/adhesive.

They sell a specific two parts adhesive but unfortunately all retailers I could find are out of stock and it would take 6 weeks at least to get hold of one.
So I am looking for a suitable alternative.

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As you can see from the pictures above, the applicator is quite thin and the glue is not very viscous probably, given it needs to seep into the 1mm space between the inner and outer lips of the two halves.
Curing time of the kit is 4 hours, if that matters.

As I understand it, any alternative would need to be:
- Water proof and resistant to chlorine (low concentration)
- An adhesive, not just a sealer
- Vibrations resistant to some extent
- Reasonably easy to remove by scraping and rubbing with alcohol
- If possible, clear in color
- Thin enough to seep into that tiny space

I was thinking of something like Loctite PL Marine Fast Cure Adhesive.
Googling, I found a suggestion that "clear industrial silicone (Not acrylic)" should work, but I ma not quite sure frankly.
Everything I could find seem silicon based, in one part with no mixing required, such as Cromwell Tools - Experts in Hand Tools, Power Tools and PPE

Not sure if anybody here on the forum could point me in the right direction, based on on the above?

Thanks for any advice!
 

Sandyn

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could you use waterproof tape until the correct adhesive is available?
 

Jameshow

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I wouldn't use silicone or a sealant tyre glue.


Look here.

I had simalar problems a few years ago on a caravan.

Cheers James
 

Cabinetman

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The stuff I would use comes in various colours – not sure if they do a clear version. It’s a builders/plumbers adhesive/sealant that will glue bricks together under water, CT1. I have used it for loads of problem fixes. Ian
 

McAldo

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could you use waterproof tape until the correct adhesive is available?
Thanks, I tried with gorilla tape, the extra wide type, but without success.
The rower stores vertically, and in that position the weight of the water presses just where the leak is, so I guess it is not enough.
 

Ollie78

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I would suggest a hybrid polymer or something like Sikaflex.
I repaired a hole in our above ground swimming pool with some Stixall a few years ago and its still good 2 years later.
Or what about the stuff they use for fishtanks and stuff like that.

Ollie
 

McAldo

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I wouldn't use silicone or a sealant tyre glue.


Look here.

I had simalar problems a few years ago on a caravan.

Cheers James
Thanks James, that seems to be just the ticket in many respects.
It is thin enough to get into that little space, it is clear and strong.
The only thing is that it would make for a permanent bond., so I would need to get it right first time around.
I will think about it.
 

McAldo

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I would suggest a hybrid polymer or something like Sikaflex.
I repaired a hole in our above ground swimming pool with some Stixall a few years ago and its still good 2 years later.
Or what about the stuff they use for fishtanks and stuff like that.

Ollie
Thanks, I am looking into Sikaflex to try and find out if it is thin enough.
I thought of fish tanks sealants, in many respects sound ideal, but I am not sure how well they can take vibrations.
I might go with hybrid polymer (CT1).
 

McAldo

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The stuff I would use comes in various colours – not sure if they do a clear version. It’s a builders/plumbers adhesive/sealant that will glue bricks together under water, CT1. I have used it for loads of problem fixes. Ian
Thanks, CT1 seem to get lots of good reviews.
It is a bit too thick to seep into into the junction with the two halves in place, but if it is slow to cure, I guess I could simply apply a generous amount to the outer rim of the tank and the stick the top in.
 

Ollie78

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With most sealants, they get "thinner" if you warm them up a bit.

Otherwise, what about a 2 part epoxy with a syringe.
Would need to be slow cure to give you enough time.

Ollie
 

Cabinetman

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Thanks, CT1 seem to get lots of good reviews.
It is a bit too thick to seep into into the junction with the two halves in place, but if it is slow to cure, I guess I could simply apply a generous amount to the outer rim of the tank and the stick the top in.
If you were to withdraw the 2 halves slightly put some on and then squeeze them together I think that would do the job, sorry you might already know, but don’t put it on the outer one and then push the inner one in or else it will go inside the machine. Ian
 

Tony51

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What plastic is it made from?.It is possible to weld, using hot air ,pvc polypropylene and high density polyethylene. This would permanently seal the the joint and be watertight. A quick trawl through Utube will show you how. If you have a plastic fabrication company near you they could do it.
 

doctor Bob

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what do you think of the water rower, I have a concept 2, not been on it for about a year due back issues.
Like to get back into it.
 

Superduner

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I use Flex tape (and Gorilla do something similar). It sticks like you know what to a blanket and does not degrade in the sun for at least 2 years (it's been sealing one of my gutters for that long in SW France). Normal Gorilla tape is a completely different product
 

mikej460

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I believe CT1 is difficult to get hold of now? but there are derivatives OB1 from Screwfix and Hippo 3 from Travis Perkins. Having used both I think OB1 would be better for you but I doubt it will creep so you may need to knife it in.
 

Tuna808

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Tensol cement,there are two types...one for regular indoors one for exterior waterproof.
 

clogs

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Vamos, Crete, GREECE.......
I've had good luck with a Polyurethene sealant / glue......slightly flexy when cured....all colours but too thick to get into the deep gap in ur drawing.....
but would feel confident to put a bead on the joint.....u can get it to squeeze in to joint as well as Silicone.....

speaking of which if u want a good Silicone sealant u'll need one from Hilti...the last time I bought some it was £15 per tube...
 

McAldo

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With most sealants, they get "thinner" if you warm them up a bit.

Otherwise, what about a 2 part epoxy with a syringe.
Would need to be slow cure to give you enough time.

Ollie
Thanks Ollie. I suppose we are talking about very gentle warming up, like putting the tube in lukewarm water beforehand?
The original repair kit is indeed a 2 part adhesive of some kind, but all the silicon or hybrid polymer I have seen are 1-part. I have been looking for a picture of the kit label, to try and figure out the actual composition, but no luck for now.
I might give the company a call tomorrow in the hope the info in their web store about 6-weeks delivery time is incorrect, but it is probably wishful thinking.
 

McAldo

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If you were to withdraw the 2 halves slightly put some on and then squeeze them together I think that would do the job, sorry you might already know, but don’t put it on the outer one and then push the inner one in or else it will go inside the machine. Ian
No, I did not not know, and thanks so much for telling me that! I have no practise at all with sealants, I am afraid. The only adhesives I use occasionally are PVA on wood and hot glue with foam airplanes.
 

McAldo

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What plastic is it made from?.It is possible to weld, using hot air ,pvc polypropylene and high density polyethylene. This would permanently seal the the joint and be watertight. A quick trawl through Utube will show you how. If you have a plastic fabrication company near you they could do it.
Thanks for asking about the plastic type.
Not having a clue, I went googling that and I struck, if not gold, at least some very specific information, finally!

The tanks is made of some type of polycarbonate which does not like bleach, apparently.

But I found some interesting info here: Identify plastic glue | Model Engineer

Quoting:

"If the old sealant peeled off, it clearly wasn'y solvent welded. The two part glues with mixing dispensers are typically epoxy or acrylic. Epoxy is not normally flexible so an acrylic is more likely. A two part silicone i also possible. For something readily available and durable I'd suggest a good quality clear RTV silicone. This may take some time to set fully so not so suited to a production environment hence their use of a two part product which are typically faster setting. At least with RTV you can remove it without damage.

A fish in the internet suggests the tank is made of polycarbonate. The dispenser shown on the web is is for a two component syringe with a static mixer nozzle attached.

Epoxy might do the job but you might never get it apart again.

I would have guessed it was a clear two component addition (platinum) curing RTV silicone. Shouldn´t attack the polycarbonate. Anything with a solvent in, is a no go. A clear sanitary silicone would probably do the job. Put a blob somewhere out of sight and see if you can get if off again.

However I had a look at this German site (https://www.poolpowershop.de/waterrower/glue-kit) and it helpfully has the supplier details of what they are selling for the job. It turns out to be an electronics grade; unfilled, room temperature fast curing; two-component polyurethane adhesive is designed for the adhesion and potting electronics."


Sorry for quoting the whole thing. It is just that I found it so hard to find specific info that I hope copying it over here might be useful to someone in the future, should they need to reseal their waterrower tank.

Anyway, so it sounds like they use a 2-part polyurethane. Not sure what "unfilled" means, but anyway.
I will need to research that a bit. Perhaps RTV silicone si a good bet, because at least I could remove it without damage if turns out to be a mistake,
 
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