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By Andy P Devon
#1325340
Would it be OK to use Diall (B+Q) BLO on a chopping board?
I've read the COSHH info for the product and it states no restriction on use so .....

Also any food safe suggestions on what to put on top of this? (assuming BLO is OK).
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By Steve Maskery
#1325342
My chopping board has nothing at all on it. It is teens of years old, made of elm and although it is no longer remotely flat, continues to serve me well.
Linseed is made of flax, so I don't see any problem with it from a culinary point of view.

I also have a nice maple chopping board, and if anyone can tell me where it is I would be very grateful.
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By sammy.se
#1325344
Steve Maskery wrote:My chopping board has nothing at all on it. It is teens of years old, made of elm and although it is no longer remotely flat, continues to serve me well.
Linseed is made of flax, so I don't see any problem with it from a culinary point of view.

I also have a nice maple chopping board, and if anyone can tell me where it is I would be very grateful.
I thought BLO has additives in it, unlike pure flax seed oil...

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By Steve Maskery
#1325345
I didn't know that. Are they harmful additives?
As I say, mine is bare naked.
S
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By Phil Pascoe
#1325346
It'll set with a skin, so little point in putting anything on top of it. Also, it doesn't tend to sink in all that well so that defeats the point. Just use a vegetable oil or paraffin (mineral) oil.
Linseed and boiled linseed are different things, flax oil for human consumption is probably just linseed but a bit cleaner. BLO has additives.
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By sammy.se
#1325348
Steve Maskery wrote:I didn't know that. Are they harmful additives?
As I say, mine is bare naked.
S
I'm not sure... What I've learned comes from Google, to be honest. Apparently it retains the name 'boiled' from methods used in the past, but now they tend to have additives to speed up drying time, instead of the heat treatment.

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By Fitzroy
#1325351
I wouldn’t use BLO as it does contain other things and I doubt you can find out what they are. I ended up using mineral oil on mine as that seemed the most neutral in nature and used by many trade chopping board makers.

Fitz
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By marcros
#1325354
If you use anything, you want a non drying oil. Mineral oil is often suggested, but of the list of suggestions the only one that I could get from a local supermarket was walnut oil. Morrisons didn't have it but Waitrose did- £3 for a small bottle, sufficient to do a dozen boards. Just beware of nut allergies particularly if you are selling/gifting the board.

The others that I saw were pure tung oil (used this previously on boards but I have lost the bottle of it), flax and raw linseed (may actually be what flax oil is).
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By thetyreman
#1325397
I wouldn't use BLO personally, more to do with the smell, the stuff stinks, so does pure linseed, I wouldn't want that smell in any of my food, pure tung does have a smell as well but it's less pungent, mineral oil is probably the best bet or chestnut food safe oil.
By Rorschach
#1325413
Raw linseed oil for me. Mineral oil is fine but it washes out really quickly so I doubt it is actually doing any good. The linseed seems to hang around longer and make the board easier to clean and dry.
By --Tom--
#1325417
Mineral oil/liquid paraffin followed by a home brew mixture of pure beeswax and mineral oil.

After a couple of months needs retreating but during that time it stops liquids soaking in. This isn’t so much to protect the wood but help stopping everything taste of onions.

A side benefit has been that it does also help with protecting from warping and keeping the board flat.

When I refresh the oil I give it a once over with a cabinet scraper first which takes out the score lines and refreshes the surface.

I’d avoid any other oils for the reasons listed by others, plus liquid paraffin is generally cheaper.