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Bradshaw Joinery

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HI Guys and Girls, I'm a fairly quiet member on here but always dropping by and taking it all in!!

My friend has convinced me to start doing a few Youtube videos, based around Joinery/construction.He is editing them together for me which is great as it takes Forever. I've done a few now but wondered if any of you guys were avid youtube watchers and what topics you enjoy watching/ what Formats work best? What keeps you watching? (I don't watch any myself) Maybe Critique some of my Videos? My channel is the same name as on here.

Many thanks

Oliver
 

powertools

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I think that the things I watch on youtube are not the same as many members of the forum.
The only channel I keep an eye on is the Sampson boat builder because it is a very long and interesting project. Other than that I only watch stuff that interests me at the time and have searched for.
I think the biggest mistake that most people who post videos on youtube make is that they start off with interesting content gain a few subscribers and then quality of content goes down.
 

Cordy

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As an enthusiastic novice woodworker THIS is the type of tutorial that I prefer

Good luck :)
 

Doug71

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Oliver, I have already seen some of your videos, I enjoy them and will definitely watch more.

The reason I enjoy them is because you look to do exactly the same kind of stuff that I do, I like seeing how other people do things, hopefully picking up a few tips and ideas along the way.

I guess people enjoy watching stuff they can relate to.

Keep up the good work.

Doug
 

D_W

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I generally watch youtube channels that have infrequent posting and where the maker isn't intending to try to turn youtube into a revenue stream.

The reason for that is that what's successful on youtube is very formulaic. Production quality over content quality, frequent posting (whether you have good content or not) and ultimately anyone with any following starts begging for money, copying other peoples' videos, doing things they're not really an expert on and making the channel about them instead of the content and accepting all kinds of rubbish from sponsors without doing much to disclose what they're doing.

For example, there's a fellow local to here who does videos. I didn't search him out, youtube recommended him. Not that many views for someone trying to make money, but as time went on, his videos became more and more hypothetical and less seemingly normal. Two tractors with loaders, one of those kawasaki mule type things, a huge yard on a very big house, two trucks, and he's posting videos about whether or not you can make a living cutting and splitting firewood.

Turns out, the tractors come from a farm store chain in the US here (he uses them for free). The utility vehicle came from a local utility vehicle dealer - he gets to borrow it indefinitely as long as he mentions their name from time to time. Just about everything in the videos is comped and what didn't make sense didn't make sense because it wasn't true.

Why bother watching? People love to watch videos like that because the guy is now spending a great deal of time with editing, he's constantly "buying something new" and doing a review (which turns out to be actually being lent things to see if he'll mention them on his channel).

There are some real gems on youtube from people who have made things their entire lives and decided to make information available, though. Like Curtis Buchanan's windsor chair series. He pretty much turned the phone or camera on and made a chair and talked about it. And then he was done.

He still makes videos from time to time, but they're often about finding less expensive ways to do things, not buying something comped to the channel.
 

thetyreman

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all of the best knowledge is in book form, youtube is ok but it has its limits.
 

D_W

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thetyreman":1303o2ia said:
all of the best knowledge is in book form, youtube is ok but it has its limits.
Books are generally better, but it is helpful to see a professional (not an instructor, but someone who made a living making things) working to a standard. I want to see a professional making a continuous gouge cut that comes out cleanly with nice proportion. I want to see how they manage the work they're doing - how much do they move, how much do they move their work. Are they working with both hands alternating? If so, how? They likely figured out much that's subtle to talk about - and found it out through economy of effort.

But most videos don't have that. Most are 90% talking, 10% doing, etc.
 

craigsalisbury

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awww another youtube rant thread :lol:

"Im not a joiner/carpenter, I'm a maker/content creator" :lol: (hammer) :lol: (hammer)

I must resist or I will go crazy on ranting about YT. There's some great channels....GID joiner for example, but yes theres a high % who make pointless-frequent-non-relevant-content to their actual business to basically become full time youtubers instead.

I remember in the 90's when there was a huge amount of advertising of computer courses like the MCSE, where companies promised if you paid them 5K, they would get you a job in an office with a company car and you could be all fancy instead of doing trade work for example. The number of people I interviewed who really had no idea about the job but could pass the exam was shocking......now we seem to have problems with lack of tradesman/tradeswomen/trades-he-she-it-they or whatever the terms are these days.
 

Bodgers

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D_W":2pohf1h6 said:
I generally watch youtube channels that have infrequent posting and where the maker isn't intending to try to turn youtube into a revenue stream.
I agree, I think what isn't helping is YouTube's focus on promoting channels with a constant stream of content. Which I suppose you can understand.

It is still possible to stumble across decent content through.

I've been watching Bob Rozaieski's stuff recently (particularly older video's) - there is a lot of decent content there.

I do appreciate your channel as well - I don't believe there are many, if any that go into the detail that you have on sharpening stones.

The platform has basically changed though, it was about private individuals (the You in the YouTube) posting their own stuff in a non progressional way, but as the money came in, presentation and retaining a viewership took over.

It is almost as if they need to separate out the commercial channels from the non-commercial amatuer channels into a different platform with a different way to find content.
 

El Barto

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D_W":2su4q0so said:
There are some real gems on youtube from people who have made things their entire lives and decided to make information available, though. Like Curtis Buchanan's windsor chair series. He pretty much turned the phone or camera on and made a chair and talked about it. And then he was done.

He still makes videos from time to time, but they're often about finding less expensive ways to do things, not buying something comped to the channel.
YES! Curtis's videos are great. As are his padawan's Elia Bizzarri. I think the reason is that they're both unassuming and genuine and that comes across in their videos. Could (and have) watch 'em for hours.
 

D_W

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Bodgers":ei2ibyb4 said:
I do appreciate your channel as well - I don't believe there are many, if any that go into the detail that you have on sharpening stones.

The platform has basically changed though, it was about private individuals (the You in the YouTube) posting their own stuff in a non professional way, but as the money came in, presentation and retaining a viewership took over.

It is almost as if they need to separate out the commercial channels from the non-commercial amatuer channels into a different platform with a different way to find content.
I never intended for my videos to be watched much - the big point of the channel at the time was to share stuff that I had otherwise posted before on sawmillcreek, but sawmillcreek is a horrible sharing platform because whatever you post goes into oblivion, it takes forever to document something (I don't cut and paste posts and put them across multiple forums, though I don't have anything against that - just not something I'd do), and if someone argues with you on a post, the site host or mods will just eliminate it all.

So I put a couple of videos on SMC and at the time first and foremost, I wanted to document the making and fitting aspects of double iron planes because there was no text - in a place where it could be seen and free.

Making good videos is beyond me - and unfortunately, I go on and on in real life just like in the videos. But the medium is still great even if you're a bad presenter but have something to share.

You're right about the platform, though. It's mature now, advertisers want more content and they want guaranteed control of it being both well produced and free of controversy, so the platform is catering to that. Advertisers have realized that getting 100k views on a video of captive people is very valuable, so just about everything being made involves something like I mentioned above - some local guy here making it look like an average dude would just have $100k worth of equipment and a bunch of steel racks (of course, he recommends people get these things even though they were given to him) to cut $2,500 worth of firewood.

Probably the majority of good makers aren't great at video production or even talking to a point briefly because they practice nuance non-verbally. I wish they'd turn on their cameras and record themselves, anyway. The worst someone can do is bug you with posts about how you should look into editing and lighting and clean your shop, etc.
 

MattyT

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Great videos. Your friend has done a great job at putting them together!
In terms of what keeps me watching, its good content that I can learn from, so any tips, tried and tested ways of doing something and independent reviews (without too much of an introduction).
On a side note, I thought it might be worth mentioning that I've started watching Sean Evelegh since I met him at the makers central exhibition at the NEC. There were lots of YouTubers with woodworking channels that were exhibiting and presenting on the main stage.
 

sammy.se

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I like your content - hope it goes well!! Just watched your side table video and left some suggestions on future improvements, from a YouTube viewer's perspective (as opposed to a woodworking forum user perspective).

please keep the content coming!!
 

Bm101

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Already Subbed. Personally I really like your style. Just good practice from a professional. No useless Gab/music/ tool promos from what I have watched.
I don't tend to watch vids as a pastime unless I need to learn how to do summat whether it's fit an NVR switch or strip an old drill or etch metal. A particular thing. And your videos, when they cover what I'm looking for are ideal.
Will continue to watch and search on your channel when needed. Thanks for taking the time to post helpful guides.
Personally for me they are really good as they are. If you want to attract new audiences I wouldn't have a clue what to suggest, sorry.
Take the one on how to cut hinges. I've fitted a good few doors by diy standards. Some of it I knew, maybe 70 percent? Some was a new. But a couple of tips were revelations by someone who does it day in day out. The tip about setting the frame hinge in 2/3 mm further than the door hinge is probably common knowledge to decent chippys. Minor lightbulb moment here though. Makes perfect sense when someone shows you. So thanks.
Anyway, cheers.
Good luck
Chris
 

Trevanion

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I think I've been a subscriber to you for a long time now, I remember getting the Accoya Domino video recommended to me on my youtube feed and I think at the time it was the only video you had. Do I get loyalty points? :wink:

It would be nice to see more architectural joiners (or more professional joiners/woodworkers in general) on youtube, it's a very sparse area compared to the hobbyist and "maker" side of youtube. I think a lot of people are interested in the more industrial side of it with all the heavy machinery and complicated techniques. But I'm just a nosy twit and I like seeing how other people do stuff, especially if I can steal the ideas :D

I quite like Scott Brown Carpentry's channel out of New Zealand, it's got a very nice, laid back presentation and all the videos are very interesting.
 

Spence

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I have to recommend 'Gid Joiner' who I found on Youtube a while back and recently had a video recommended. If you want the authentic feel of a craftsman at work with the video being a distant 2nd to the work being done then this guy is your ticket.

All the videos are him on a job, it ranges from some repair work to putting up fences, creating solid tulipwood gates with tenons or cabinetry with dominoes or biscuits. All done by a guy who resembles Karl Pilkington.

I like that he will film his work and explain what he's going to do, its all very matter of fact and you get the impression he's been doing it years. He's very talented, the work is properly done and all the while he's smoking hand rolled cigarettes and dropping the camera off ladders.

He doesn't really do tool reviews, if he uses a tool its because its good. Want an air nailer? Just look at what he uses, you might see a brand name under the years of accreted sawdust and patina but that just proves its a tool and not yet another opportunity to show off like so many other youtube videos.
 

craigsalisbury

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Love Bradshaw Joinery, one of the better YT channels, there are no gimmicks or tool review b*ll*x. GID Joiner is another favourite. I have unsubscribed to most US channels as its turning into high street TV and many UK channels are going the same way. I have a couple of UK channels i watch for cringe factor, but there are very few that I really look forward to new videos going up (Bradshaw Joinery, GID Joiner, Freebird (kinda)).
 
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