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Winter storage, wax on tools?

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Argus

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Try Renaissance Wax.


It's a conservation-grade wax polish which, although initially expensive, requires just a trace on a cloth to be effective. It will also add protection and a shine to the wooden parts.
Not sure about cast iron beds, but it's ideal for the metal and wooden parts of expensive tools.

Otherwise there are oil and grease preparations.....
 

Argus

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@Argus Wood will withstand a bit of damp, steel less so?


Indeed - but the wood needs some protection. Renaissance wax is also an excellent cleaner and polish which leaves a protective coating.

I've mentioned this elsewhere on this forum where the issue of rust-prevention in unheated workshops seems to be centred on controlling the Relative Humidity (RH) in the space, the real issue is keeping the metal temperature above whatever Dewpoint temperatures will be encountered throughout the cold months.
 

pe2dave

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Indeed - but the wood needs some protection. Renaissance wax is also an excellent cleaner and polish which leaves a protective coating.

I've mentioned this elsewhere on this forum where the issue of rust-prevention in unheated workshops seems to be centred on controlling the Relative Humidity (RH) in the space, the real issue is keeping the metal temperature above whatever Dewpoint temperatures will be encountered throughout the cold months.
Perhaps. though I did ask about protecting steel?
 

BillK

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I'm using Liberon Lubricating Wax. When I've forgotten to use it I've found rust spots on the tables sometimes, it does seem to work. Sometimes use it on tools, or wipe on/wipe off some ACF50 or Gibbs Brand (an overpriced overrated aerosol thin oil that happens to be in a rack).

Also I've got bare steel sheet in there that stays rust free so long as I remember to crack a window open a small bit, soon as I forget, things rust.
 

Ollie78

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I have gone through a few of these. First I bought a little tub of "tool protection" wax, I forget the name, it worked but was the stickiest wax ever and an absolute pain to buff.
I have used Boeshield as well and while it works pretty well I found it would gum up the nozzle easily and require dunking in boiling water to keep it clear I actually have a bit left in a can but it refuses to come out despite cleaning the nozzle. It would be better if it came in a non spray bottle or tin, I may stab the can and put the remains in a jar.
Renaissance wax is pretty good and goes along way but I used mine up.
So lately I am using good old black bison paste wax on my machine beds just because I had some and that seems to be fine.
Sometimes I give my chisels a wipe with camelia oil as well.

Ollie
 

Sideways

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Metalguard ultra, followed by liberon machine table wax. The latter is liquid from the can and buffs up nicely. It is supposed to have rust resistant additives included.
And throw a blanket over it when not in use.
 

eribaMotters

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When needed I've gone over surfaces with 400 grit aluminium oxide and a spot of honing oil. Wipe down next with kitchen towel and then a thin application of furniture wax and a light buff. I cannot recall having to do this to any surface more than twice, and some machines I've owned for 25 years.

Colin
 

Phill05

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You will find if you use a heat gun to warm up the metal before the wax it soaks in a little and lasts longer, I put a planer away over 30+ years ago and when recently got it out the beds were perfect I used Brywax, but some screws that did not get any were very rusty.
 

Sheptonphil

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I spray GT85 on all my iron work. Spray, light wipe, no problems. Lathe bed, Mortimer, bandsaw all still have perfect beds and tables. Even if there is sawdust on them, it soaks into the dust and protects the metal underneath.

smells nice too, workshoppy kind of smell. 🙂
 

D_W

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Any paste wax will do fine and last for months.

I have tools in a garage. Any that have ever seen wax or oilstones never rust. I think a lot of what causes rust when there's oil on a tool is outright droplet condensation or tools being handled (removing the oil slowly), or something literally dripping on them.

When I used waterstones, It seemed like there was something rusting all the time (because there was).

A look under a metallurgical microscope gives an idea of just how long oil will last on a surface - even if you wipe something oily on your pants ( and it's barely oily) now the spot on your pants will oil things - you have to find something like 6 dry cloth areas to wipe over progressively to get all of the oil off.

At any rate wax for tools. If you have a surface that's so rarely used that the type of wax matters, an extremely light cut of clear shellac will stop rust (not a bad idea for plane sides for those of you who don't use oilstones and who don't use your tools often). You can wax the sole and the same as with castings, even if you wax the wear surfaces, a very light cut of clear shellac on the cast surfaces that aren't fit or wear surfaces will save you a lot of headaches. It'll wipe off with alcohol if it's a problem.
 

gog64

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I use Axminster machine wax because it’s cheap and silicone free. I work in a draughty wooden barn, so probably worst case scenario for steel & cast iron machinery! The instructions say to apply sparingly and then buff it. I don’t bother buffing as I find that it works much better without. If I know I’m not going to use a machine for a while then I slather on a good layer! Otherwise little & often. Cheap as chips, works well for me.
 

Fergie 307

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No one has mentioned spraying the lot in wd-40 or my poor man way of smothering the machine in pound land vasiline.. 😂
Only issue with WD40 and similar is that if you leave it for a long time it dries out and leaves a hard deposit on the surface. Still protects it but doesn't look great, and has to be removed with thinners or petrol soaked rag. so fine for day to day, not so good for stuff stored for several months. I can see that Vaseline would probably work. Most important thing is to cover it up, but with something that can breathe. I just use cotton bed sheets. If you get dust on the tool then this will absorb moisture and make matters worse.
 

Hanman-Tools

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As a tool restorer for some years, I tried WD40 in my early years but found on a day when the tools were up for sale on an outside shop display when I looked at them later they showed spots in the oil. Then after reading in an old original Tool Makers catalogue I noticed all their tools were advertised as "Waxed". I tried this and used Briwax and this certainly stopped the spotting on the steel parts providing the tools were wiped with cotton cloth after bringing them indoors, great and kept the natural look. On my rarer tools which had more value, I used Renaissance wax which did not give a heavy shine but gave more of a sheen a bit less gaudy, and is good for wood, brass, metal.
 

D_W

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I'm sure there's something that would dissolve the oxidized bits left behind by WD40 - the layer left behind is intentional. I haven't read much historically, but always wax wooden tools because some oils will propagate mould, and the (mildly) toxic solvent based waxes like briwax will help the oils dry faster in combination and then nothing will grow in it.

Rule of thumb for anything that doesn't deserve clear shellac, though, is briwax if the wax needs to dry, and 50/50 beeswax/mineral oil for tools where a non-drying wax coat is preferable. Food grade mineral oil would only oxidize extremely slowly, and a 50/50 mix can just be wiped on the tool without waiting for drying.

(I probably said above in this thread, tool waxing has become rare once using the tools more and waxing the saws in use, and in using oilstones on everything else to finish - not to prevent rust, but because there's far less time wasting involved with oilstones than there are with most other types - one has to understand not wasting time honing the whole tool with a finish stone, but there's nothing in waterstones as fast as an india stone and a decent ark stone following. I"m done before I'd have fetched water and flattened stones when I used waterstones).
 

thetyreman

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ACF50 is what I use now, especially on cast iron, it's particularly good for long-term storage, since using it on my planes about 3 months ago there's not even a hint of rust.
 
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