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Veritas replacement laminate sheets

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ali27

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Hello guys. I have a question about this product. Veritas sells flat
glass and also sells laminate sheets that can be put on the glass.

The laminate sheets' purpose is to keep the abrasive powder in its
place so you can use it as a lapping plate. It also prevents the abrasive
powder damaging the glass plate, so no scratches and it stays flat. The
laminate sheets are only 0.01 thick.

This way flattening soles of planes or flattening waterstones is very easy.
When the sheet loses its flattnes, just peel it off and replace it.

I am looking for something similar, but I can't find anything via google. I type
''laminate sheet 0.01'' , but can't find anything I am looking for.

Could somebody please give me a link or tell me the name of what I am looking
for? Also anybody have experience with this product?

Thanks.

Ali29
 

dunbarhamlin

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An alternative is just to use a pane of cheap thin glass (or, I understand, perspex) as a sacrificial overlay.
 

Shrubby

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Sounds like Mylar sheet,Try an art supplier - it's used for stencils and paper conservation
Matt
 

ali27

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Shrubby":qx25zh3l said:
Sounds like Mylar sheet,Try an art supplier - it's used for stencils and paper conservation
Matt
Shrubby, I think you are right. This is what I found from Lee Valley site:

The best way to flatten sharpening stones is to lap them on plate glass that has had a bit of loose silicon carbide sprinkled on it. Add a bit of oil or water (depending on stone type) to create a slurry.
This will quickly flatten water stones, Arkansas stones and even man-made stones
(both aluminum oxide and silicon carbide). Ninety grit particles are about right for this process.

Plane bottoms have traditionally been lapped on soft cast-iron plates using a sequence of silicon carbide grits. A lapping plate should be softer than the item being lapped, so if you want to do a plane bottom, you can increase the effectiveness of plate glass by gluing a sheet of mylar film to it. The silicon carbide particles will bed in the mylar and abrade the plane bottom faster. Plain plate glass is fine for stone flattening, but the mylar helps appreciably when doing plane bottoms.
Now I need to find this.

Ali
 
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