Tormek 2000 Vs Robert Sorby pro edge

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For flatwork tools though a wet grinder may be a better choice? The only downside is the water.
The major downside of the Tormek is the speed, it takes forever to get a new bevel on a wide thick plane iron. And when I say forever I mean it. The bevel up blade for my Veritas shooting plane took about 1 hour of constant grinding with some small pauses. I was extremely frustrated at times and went for the Pro Edge instead.

Pro Edge has it's downs as well, it's difficult to get an absolute straight edge on things, but I only use it for primary bevels and for that it works great and is fast.
 
I would definitely say you need to use the truing tool in that instance.
First grind on a brand new (likely off square) plane ought to take no longer than 5 mins.
Re grinds 2 mins.
But it needs to have a clean stone to function. It’s like using sandpaper that’s gummed up and useless, or lost all its grit, it just doesn’t work if the stone has been allowed to become saturated with rubbish.
For primary regrinds, I always sit as much of the bevel on the stone to set the angle, rather than using the angle tool. Reason being I ground it to the correct angle (give or take a degree) the first time, and I want to continue with that. Means less time grinding, as I may set the gauge a degree off and have to remove too much material as a result, but I can instead make it quicker and have to remove less of my blade.
Maybe every 10 regrinds check the angle with the tool provided.
 
I would definitely say you need to use the truing tool in that instance.
First grind on a brand new (likely off square) plane ought to take no longer than 5 mins.
Re grinds 2 mins.
But it needs to have a clean stone to function. It’s like using sandpaper that’s gummed up and useless, or lost all its grit, it just doesn’t work if the stone has been allowed to become saturated with rubbish.
For primary regrinds, I always sit as much of the bevel on the stone to set the angle, rather than using the angle tool. Reason being I ground it to the correct angle (give or take a degree) the first time, and I want to continue with that. Means less time grinding, as I may set the gauge a degree off and have to remove too much material as a result, but I can instead make it quicker and have to remove less of my blade.
Maybe every 10 regrinds check the angle with the tool provided.
Was that answer to me? The 1 hour on the PMW11 thick bevel up blade started with the stone truing tool, think I used it halfway through as well. The problem with these thick wide blades is that the surface area is so big that the grinding pressure/mm2 becomes really small, and it seems the Tormek stone doesn't remove much material at all under those circumstanses.
 
Was that answer to me? The 1 hour on the PMW11 thick bevel up blade started with the stone truing tool, think I used it halfway through as well. The problem with these thick wide blades is that the surface area is so big that the grinding pressure/mm2 becomes really small, and it seems the Tormek stone doesn't remove much material at all under those circumstanses.
Are you absolutely certain you used the truing tool and not just the dressing stone ? The dressing stone is by far the cheaper option, is handheld and looks like kind of like ann oilstone and has the two sides, purportedly to give a coarser or finer grit to the whetstone. But it doesn’t clean or truly resurface the stone.
The truing tool is another jig/tool test mounted bit that ought to be packaged as standard with any whetstone grinder, and is essential to keep the unit functioning. Particularly if you bought the tormek secondhand.
 
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Couple of corrections or edits for the above.
I’m referring to the grading stone above as the handheld oilstone like one, not a dressing stone.

And please see the below quoted from an Axminster review of the additional diamond stone for tormeks -

“For many years I used a Tormek Supergrind and then more recently I bought a T7, both equipped with the standard Al Oxide wheel, which does a great job on O1 steel. However, there are several acute disadvantages, first and foremost is that with exotic steels such a A2 and PMV-11, the wheel's surface RAPIDLY glazes and after a very short time, it neRead more about review stating Light years ahead...beam me up Scotty!
eds to be cleaned of all the accumulated gunk by truing with the TT-50 wheel dresser; a time consuming and irritating process which quite rapidly reduces the diameter of the wheel itself. Second and foremost, turning tools such as gouges can be sharped, but the process of rolling them across the stone leaves inevitable furrows, which means that you need to resort to the TT-50 yet again with a further reduction in the diameter.
Fit the DC-250 and the two issues mentioned instantly evaporate! It will rapidly grind any sort of steel with a speed which is hard to reconcile with the original wheel, furthermore the steel is still water cooled, even though it's necessary to add a small amount of ACC-150 Anti Corrosion concentrate.
The wheel cuts extremely rapidly with a very light initial touch; whereas a PMV-ll blade might have originally taken twenty to thirty minutes to grind, the same blade can now be ground in five or less minutes. Tormek also confirmed by email that the DC-250 wheel will also handle the very hard cutting steel and soft backing iron on Japanese chisels with no degradation or clogging of the diamond surface.”

Having only ever used and sharpened traditional steel and nothing fancy I didn’t realise they sharpen particularly differently.
 
One issue mostly ignored here is inhaling dust from exotic steel. All the dry grinders will kick out tons of dust. And it's quite unhealthy by all accounts.
 
Are you absolutely certain you used the truing tool and not just the dressing stone ? The dressing stone is by far the cheaper option, is handheld and looks like kind of like ann oilstone and has the two sides, purportedly to give a coarser or finer grit to the whetstone. But it doesn’t clean or truly resurface the stone.
The truing tool is another jig/tool test mounted bit that ought to be packaged as standard with any whetstone grinder, and is essential to keep the unit functioning. Particularly if you bought the tormek secondhand.
I'm well aware of the difference between the truing tool and the (totally meaningless) dressing stone which makes a difference for about 10 seconds. My friend didn't believe me either when I said it took one hour so I let him give it a try on his Tormek. He ended up around 50 minutes.

I see your latest post about the diamond wheel and that makes sence. It cuts the pmw11 faster (he actually bought a diamond wheel after our test) but not fast. It's still a very slow process for just making a new primay bevel on a tool.
 
I'm well aware of the difference between the truing tool and the (totally meaningless) dressing stone which makes a difference for about 10 seconds. My friend didn't believe me either when I said it took one hour so I let him give it a try on his Tormek. He ended up around 50 minutes.

I see your latest post about the diamond wheel and that makes sence. It cuts the pmw11 faster (he actually bought a diamond wheel after our test) but not fast. It's still a very slow process for just making a new primay bevel on a tool.
My experience as well which is one of the reasons I sold it, I can regrind if required on the pro-edge or grindstone and hone by hand far easier and a lot less messy.
We're all different and it's just a matter of preference as all methods have pros and cons. JohnnyB make a valid point about dry grinding dust which is why I have vaccuum ports behind the pro-edge and grinder.
 

The wear is inconsequential for the average user. Let's not be pedantic. I've had mine 9 years, and I am a busy chap with a preference for hand tools. The CBN wheels are going strong. I have used vitreous wheels in the past, over a couple of decades, and they all wore as soon as used, and wore significantly within a short space of time.

Regards from Perth

Derek
 
Thanks all for the responses.

Reading through everything, I'm going to hold off on buying either now.

I genuinely thought a powered sharpening system was just easy and without issues. But if I'm still spending all that money and still having to use stones and hands at the end, I might as well do it for a bit longer by hand and live without the mess, noise, hole in the pocket and work with fewer stuff.

May not be the best conclusion, but it will be fine as I don't use the difficult to sharpen turning tools etc.
 

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