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Tools for 8 year old apprentice

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markturner

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Hi, my youngest has expressed an interest in learning woodwork with me, I wanted to get him a little kit, but am having trouble finding small versions of tools for him. I think a small plane, small saw, hammer etc would be good. Any suggestions? I don't want to spend a fortune, in case the interest wanes... but don't want to buy rubbish either, such as the childs tool kits available on ebay etc. He was using my antique number 2 plane at the weekend, but it was a bit stressful for me, in case he dropped it!!

Cheers, Mark
 

Hardwood66

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Faith full kits is good for young hands not to expensive if miss used aswell


If life gives you melons you may be dyslexic
 

marcros

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What about getting him going on smaller sized projects- eg a simple box- that way, although the project would be no easier, things like a plane could step down a size, and a no 3 would become a jointer etc? Also, a cheap backsaw's teeth bought on ebay could be recut and sharpened to something more appropriate, eg from 20tpi to "normal" tenon saw teeth. Probably cost a lot less than a new, small sized one, and be better quality.

I am no expert, but could wooden planes be an option- I dont know about the sizes, but they are less collectable than your antique number 2, so might be worth investigating. If they only cost a few quid, you could always adapt them for smaller hands.

Dodge might be worth a message- I dont know how old your child is, but James has been doing various projects for a while, so Dodge will have a good idea about what sized tools fit small hands well!
 

woodbloke

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markturner":2aso9n97 said:
Hi, my youngest has expressed an interest in learning woodwork with me, I wanted to get him a little kit, but am having trouble finding small versions of tools for him. I think a small plane, small saw, hammer etc would be good. Any suggestions? I don't want to spend a fortune, in case the interest wanes... but don't want to buy rubbish either, such as the childs tool kits available on ebay etc. He was using my antique number 2 plane at the weekend, but it was a bit stressful for me, in case he dropped it!!

Cheers, Mark
This is one of the biggest problems for youngsters (with my D&T teachers hat on and 20 years at the chalk face). Small people (i.e. children) don't have big enough hands, or the physical strength to manipulate full sized adult tools and that's what almost all of them are, so it's going to be an uphill struggle to find something suitable that will fit the bill...difficult call :wink: - Rob
 

Cheshirechappie

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Might be prudent to avoid the 'budget' ranges. Some of them don't work very well even in experienced hands, so they may well serve only to dishearten the young.

How about a proper penknife (with adequate supervision and proper 'banging-on' about respecting it's dangers)? Many a lad has whittled happily for hours. I mention this because I wasn't allowed a penknife when I was a lad, and it still rankles!
 

Dodge

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As you have probably seen in my earlier threads I have been experiencing exactly these problems with my son who was 10 in November.

Anyway the one thing that I strongly suggest is that you get him "proper" tools not those cheap and nasty kids tools, they will put him off before he starts!

I have sent you a PM!

Rog
 

promhandicam

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Eye protection, ear protection (if he is going to be in a workshop when machines are in use), a mask (if any sanding is going to take place) and and safety boots before you think about tools.
 

GazPal

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I'd start him off in the same manner as when my son (Now an apprentice cabinetmaker) began and introduce him to using smaller versions of adult size tools. A block plane and spokeshave are a decent starting point in terms of planing, then simply add cross pein hammer, small mallet and suitable sized squares, etc., for the small projects he becomes involved in. :)
 

Pekka Huhta

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In addition to small planes, I would get a small japanese ryoba or dozuki saw. I have noted that the pulling action of a japanese saw suits much better to a child's hand coordination. It's a big difference. Japanese tools are light and easy to use.

Another good tool could be a hand drill. An old eggbeater or similar. It's always a favorite tool for certain age. If at all possible, try to find a model with the gears covered, so that he can't pinch his fingers between the gears.

Over here the first tool for a kid (be it a boy or a girl) would be a whittling knife. If you want to make it safer you can grind the tip of the knife dull, but keep the knife otherwise sharp. Biggest accidents always happen with dull tools as the kids have to use excessive force when using the knife. The knife may have a finger guard or then not, most important is that the handle is small enough so that his fingers fit it properly.

http://www.lamnia.fi/items.php?lang=fi&pid=3991

Marking tools are always a good idea, and there are also "miniature tools" available (small fixed and sliding bevels etc).

But first of all, give him sharpening stones so that he can keep his tools in good shape. For a kid I'd say diamond stones would be ideal as they cut fast and don't need any water or oil. It's important that he knows how to keep his tools in a good shape, even if you "help him out" every once in a while.

Pekka
 

Harbo

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I had a "woodworking play session" in the workshop with my 2 younger Granddaughters aged 4 & 7 recently.
Doing a bit of planing, sawing, hammering and turning some brass on my Unimat3 - all under very careful supervision.
Finding the tools small enough is a big issue as nothing I had really fitted them.
They did enjoy themselves though.
Another problem is the height of workbenches unless some sort of platform is used.
Also there must be an optimum age when children are physically able to use tools (even small ones) properly?


Rod
 

woodbloke

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I did see on the Axminster site that LN offer a No1 which I didn't realise, but at nearly £200 it's very probably too much for an 8yo, who may not appreciate it...could always be added to the collection though? - Rob
 

Harbo

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Veritas do a rear tote accessory for their LV block plane which makes it into a small conventional plane.

Rod
 

woodbloke

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Harbo":agx6slzn said:
Veritas do a rear tote accessory for their LV block plane which makes it into a small conventional plane.

Rod
...and there's also the new LV low angle plane as well which is similar - Rob
 

Tierney

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Hi, I've done some box making with two six year olds and used a painting platform which is about a foot and a half high which allowed them to use the bench comfortably. I used a small cross pein hammer, an Irwin tool box saw (about 12 inches long) and a Stanley block plane. The trouble I had was the attention span, you need to be quite well prepared otherwise the interest wanes, and you don't want a child exploring while you're looking for a tool!

I would stay away from budget tools (yes I'm on the slope), maybe pick up some good condition second hand Stanley / Record or similar stuff, do a bit of fettling and allow the collection to grow as the interest grows.

DT
 
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