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Three-pin plug advice. Any 'Sparkies' out there please?'

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Benchwayze

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I know it sounds like a stupid question.
But:

Why does the three-pin plug on my electric kettle get hot. The pins become too hot to touch, and the lead itself gets quite warm, almost as if there's too much resistance.

I don't leave it plugged in after use, and I always stay in the kitchen while it's plugged in.
I suspect a new lead is called for, as the pins are quite worn and maybe need a clean? Or maybe it's over-fused? (Not by me, I should add.) The socket doesn't get warm, nor does the two way adapter.

Is there an electrician who can advise please?

Thanks in anticipation.

Regards
John :?:
 

Blister

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Sounds like it time for a new Kettle not just the lead

They are cheap now days

Not worth taking a risk with it :wink:
 

Pete Maddex

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Hi,

You have a bad connection thats why its getting hot, it won't get better, you need to replace it sooner rather than later.

We recently replaced ours with an Alessi Hot It, not cheap but we have only had 3 kettles in 28 years by buying good ones.

Pete
 

mbartlett99

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Is the plug moulded on, or can it be removed? If the latter you may be able to cut it back, but if you're not sure its new lead time - and perhaps I should inject a small note of urgency, low power connections getting that hot will very certainly end in tears.
 

flying haggis

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From what you say it sounds as though the brass plug pins are a tiny bit undersized and aren't making as good a contact with the socket. It also sounds as though the cable itself is undersized for the load. Does the cable have any writing on it and what is the wattage of the kettle? If you have one try a different lead.
 

newt

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Can't see how the element can take more power but still work ok, I suspect high resistance at the plug pins or around the fuse connector if the sockets are ok.
 

Pete Maddex

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Hi,

Last one I took to bits for the same sort of problem had a badly crimped connection, and the wire was discoloured for a way down the cable. So its best to get a new one unless you can cut off enough to get to clean copper.


Pete
 

Benchwayze

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(For some reason I had no notifications on this thread.)

So Thanks fellas,

It's new kettle time. Away to Curry's or some-such tomorrow.
Thanks one and all =D>

John :ho2
 

Steve Maskery

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It may be new socket time, not just new kettle time.
The problem is that the contact between the pin and the socket is very poor. UK sockets are, apparently, not very well designed, despite being around for ever. That poor connection leads to overheating in the plug,, can cause melting, which damages the plug thus reducing the quality of the connection further.
I had one where the plug ended up literally being welded into the wall.
S
 

Jonzjob

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If there is a bad connection that is causing the plug to get hot you will see it on the plug pins. It will look burned. If not then there is nothing wrong with the socket. Heat is caused by arcing across a bad connection. If the bad connection is in the plug then it will get hot.

Unless the kettle is quite old it will have a moulded plug and the only thing that you can get at in that is the fuse. For a kettle it should be a 13 amp fuse.

It's easy to sort out what size fuse you need for anything.

For example you have a 235 volt single phase supply and a kettle that has a element of 2,500 watt. The kettle will take a fraction over 10 amps because you divide the wattage by the voltage to find the amperage. Sorry if this is a lesson on egg sucking :mrgreen:

By the way, if you think that U.K. sockets are a bad designe you should see the French ones. Pony poo comes to mind

Slightly off thread, but I thought you might like to see how the French do thier wiring? This is one of many junction boxes around the walls in my house here. The transparent thing on the right is the relay for the kitchen 4 way light switches.

 

newt

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Jonzjob":1kvzh016 said:
If there is a bad connection that is causing the plug to get hot you will see it on the plug pins. It will look burned. If not then there is nothing wrong with the socket. Heat is caused by arcing across a bad connection. If the bad connection is in the plug then it will get hot.

Unless the kettle is quite old it will have a moulded plug and the only thing that you can get at in that is the fuse. For a kettle it should be a 13 amp fuse.

It's easy to sort out what size fuse you need for anything.

For example you have a 235 volt single phase supply and a kettle that has a element of 2,500 watt. The kettle will take a fraction over 10 amps because you divide the wattage by the voltage to find the amperage. Sorry if this is a lesson on egg sucking :mrgreen:

By the way, if you think that U.K. sockets are a bad designe you should see the French ones. Pony poo comes to mind

Slightly off thread, but I thought you might like to see how the French do thier wiring? This is one of many junction boxes around the walls in my house here. The transparent thing on the right is the relay for the kitchen 4 way light switches.


John not really in the spirit of the IEE regs :D
 

Jonzjob

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Well, at least there is something that you can be sure of. Line is either red, blue, orange, yellow, green, white or any other colour you can find, but earth is always green/yellow and pigs fly :shock: Also, the left hand socket in a wall socket is either line or neutral and if you have a double socket they are normally mirror image to each other and the left is bussed together as is the right. So a plug in the bottom one is the opposite sense to the one in the top! Get my drift :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen:

I was trying to find a fault. I took the top off that box and promptly put it back again :? :?
 

Ateallthepies

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Unless you want to buy a new kettle then just chop off the old plug top and connect a new 13A plug top to the kettle lead. If the thing still heats up the problem will be within the kettle or the socket and you will have wasted £1 on a plug, if not then jobs a goodun!!

Not sure if UK socket outlets are poor but one thing is certain, adding weight on the connections by the use of multi-socket adaptors will eventually cause problems. One plug in one socket is the way.

Steve.
 

Benchwayze

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Thanks again folks,

I tried a computer lead with the kettle. (13a fuse John!) Not a problem, so I suspect the lead and or plug is the culprit.
However, not being a cheap-skate, and admitting the kettle is about 15 years old, I will buy a new one tomorrow; a decent make of course.

Thanks again everyone. :D

John
 

Jonzjob

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I would agree with that. If you want/need to plug any high current device to a socket then 1 and 1 is the best and safe way. If you have to connect any medium to low current devices to the same socket then an extention cable with a multi socket is really the only way to go, as long as you don't go over the capicity of that socket, which for normal sockets is 13 amps.

Multi adaptors are at best a temporary solution.

Just don't exceed the limit of the socket and make sure that all of the connections are good ones.

When I lived in Astley, N/W Manchester, in the 70s, Woolworths had a BIG fire in the centre of Manchester and a LOT of people lost their lives. The cause was sorted to a couple of sockets that had several adaptors pluged into them and they had been overloaded. They caught fire and KILLED! It wasn't helped by the fact that the safety exits had been chained and locked, but the fire started by the overloading!

Please remember that.

Edit : - Just read your post John. Good choice. As a matter of interest your 'puter lead is quite adequate for the job, but with a kekkle that old, not a bad bet mate. Ours was designed by Porsche, nought to sixty in 10 seconds. 60 to 210 another couple of minutes :mrgreen:
 

Ateallthepies

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Yep the 'trailing' multi-adaptors are fine, I meant those terrible 'block' style adaptors. I have seen two of these together in one single socket outlet with five things plugged in :shock: looking like a drooping cigarette end that needs a flick and almost as hot :wink:

Steve.
 

Benchwayze

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Ateallthepies":jhjl2mck said:
Yep the 'trailing' multi-adaptors are fine, I meant those terrible 'block' style adaptors. I have seen two of these together in one single socket outlet with five things plugged in :shock: looking like a drooping cigarette end that needs a flick and almost as hot :wink:

Steve.
Errr... No... Not at all! I have one, but it's never used. Always use just the kettle or the Microwave direct into the wall. That is I remove the adapter before I use the socket. Just a habit, and I think tomorrow I should take it to the local quarry pool and see how far I can throw the ruddy thing.. (The adapter, not the pool!) Wouldn't be the green thing to do though would it?
:mrgreen:
 

Jonzjob

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Adaptors aren't bad things, just misused.

As long as they are for temporary use or low power, reading lights, etc. and DON'T exceed the ring main loading they are fine. But remember, buy cheap, get cheap.
 

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