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Stormproof casement windows

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dellpitch

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Hi
I am thinking of making a set of windows to replace our exsisting PVC windows
in a 1970's house.

I have recently been on an Axminster Spindle Moulding course, which I found very good.

The machine I have in mind is the Axminster WS100TA.

The question, which of the Euro Cutters & Limiters will I need, a) to make them correctly
& b) avoid buying those that will have no input into the project.
I propose to make a dummy window complete with hardware to try and minimise mistakes.
The widows would be made from E. Oak finished with a white micro porous paint so that they
do not look to different from the existing.

Any help/thoughts/advice would be much appreciated.

Regards
 

dellpitch

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Alan

The reason for using a hardwood is because I thought that I would get a better finish and a more stable product
than using a softwood, please correct me if I am wrong.

Regards
 

=Adam=

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European oak is going to be an expensive timber to use of you are just going to paint over them.

Why not try some cheaper hard woods such as iroko, beech or sapele?

I have been told in the past that oak doesn't fair that well when used for exterior purposes, now I'm not sure if there is much truth in that but it is worth thinking about as it could be a costly mistake.


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lugo35

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did you know that you now need planning permision to change windows! mad i know. but any changes need it, so i been told by architect.
 

ProShop

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IMHO Oak doesn't paint that well for outdoors, stains & oils well but not paint.
Most quality micro-porous paints like a softer wood so the paint can penetrate the wood better.

We make hundreds of doors/windows usually in straight grained Hemlock, Scandinavian redwood in firsts & seconds grade and other hardwoods & Oak.
Remember Oak doesn't like raw steel fixings, it releases tannins that attack the metal and corrodes the metal and leaves ugly black stains.

I don't recall any of the euro cutters being suitable for stormproof windows though, Axminster claimed the had some traditional sash window cutters but in reality they certainly were Not traditional.

And as mentioned in the above post, make sure you don't fall foul of the new planning rules & regs. Give your local planning dept a visit/call they are usually helpful.
 

dellpitch

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Thank you all for your replies.

Adam & Proshop; yes I will look at other hardwoods, does Hemlock paint well?
One of the reasons for painting is that none of the houses in our road have other
than PVC - white or the old "Crittall" type windows painted white with exception of one house that has wooden windows painted blue.
That house had its windows changed many years ago.

lugo35/Proshop, I was unaware that I needed planning permission to change, will investigate further next week.

Thanks again for the replies.
 

Dibs-h

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lugo35":2ek1nmzj said:
did you know that you now need planning permision to change windows! mad i know. but any changes need it, so i been told by architect.
Might depend on where you are, i.e., conservation area, listed, etc. If it's none of these - would be interested in how\why you might need P&P?

Dibs
 

lugo35

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im in wales so may differ in england. its not just for conservation areas and listed buildings.
personaly i wouldnt bother :D
 

=Adam=

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I would like to add that each individual council has its own planning department which can have their own regulations, for example this could mean that my local planning office will not allow a garden fence of over 5ft, but the neighbouring councils will allow up to 7ft (just and example, never really checked this one haha).

It is worth checking though as you could be forced to remove them if there is something wrong.

Hope it goes well though!




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Dibs-h

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=Adam=":15zm0qyg said:
It is worth checking though
I sometimes adopt the other approach - i.e. don't. And if someone came round - my std response would be, "it's always been like that. If you think not - prove it."

But to each their own.

DIbs
 
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