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Storage of cast iron and similar tools

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paulm

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To date the cast iron tables on my bandsaw and table saw, and the steel on the lathe beds, has all been fine in my workshop which is reasonably dry and gets a little background heat during the winter. The occasional coat of liberon lubricating wax helps keeps everything rust free too.

Due to some impending building work though, all the gear will temporarily need to be shifted into a large wooden, uninsulated shed, with no electrics, for temporary storage that could easily be a year or thereabouts :(

Wondering what extra precautions I should be taking to keep any rust and deterioration at bay ? Reluctant to slather the kit with thick sticky rust inhibiting grease, but not sure if the lubricating wax will be sufficient in these new conditions ?

As I will be trying to cram the gear into about half the space it currently occupies I'm assuming I won't be able to easily access to re-treat periodically, so really ideally a one off approach up front ?

Cheers, Paul
 

Myfordman

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Is it not possible to get a power supply into the container? A dehumidifier should not only drop the humidity but also provide a little heat.

MM
 

paulm

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Myfordman":3510syh9 said:
Is it not possible to get a power supply into the container? A dehumidifier should not only drop the humidity but also provide a little heat.

MM
There'll not be any electric hookup unless I run a temporary overground cable from somewhere, but the shed has open eaves where the corrugated cement board roof meets the wall plate, and a fairly loose fitting door, so there will be continual air flow to some extent, rather than a fairly well sealed space that could be dried out reasonably well ?

Cheers, Paul
 

woodpig

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Paul Chapman

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paulm":34pgqw9z said:
[the shed has open eaves where the corrugated cement board roof meets the wall plate, and a fairly loose fitting door, so there will be continual air flow to some extent, rather than a fairly well sealed space that could be dried out reasonably well ?
I think air circulation is very important to prevent stuff going rusty. I keep all my tools in my garage which is unheated and gets very cold in the winter. However, there is fairly good air circulation caused by gaps around the up-and-over door and this helps prevent rust. I find that tools that are not covered up (such as my bandsaw and smaller tools kept on hooks on the wall) do not get rusty. Other tools which I had previously kept in cupboards (where there was no air circulation) tended to rust.

I find that plane sacks (such as those you received with your (green :mrgreen: ) Cliftons) are good for preventing rust.

Cheers :wink:

Paul
 

Bluekingfisher

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Newbie_Neil":275gq63m said:
Paul,

Have a word with Steve Maskery, as he moved all of his kit into storage that was unheated.

Thanks,
Neil
He also got most of it nicked. And, as I recall what was left was covered in rust when he went to retieve it.
 

stevep

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Have a look at the corroless range of products. Well respected in heavy industry.
 

Harbo

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Boeshield T9 sprays on and prevents rust - it is also easy to wipe off afterwards as necessary. Expensive but a little goes a long way and Rutlands often sell it on BOGOF.

Rod
 

Jacob

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Assuming a dry shed the main prob would be condensation from changes in temp and humidity. Stand it on polythene, on pallets, and cover with polythene sheets.
 

wallace

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For cast tables and bright stuff maybe try waxoyle and then cover with cling film. Also like already said covering helps to stop condensation
 

woodfarmer

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Trying to use a de-humidifier in a cold place is a bad idea, they just cant work. If it is just cast iron and metal, I would be tempted to spray them with diesel oil using a paraffin gun. Although T9 is really good, but expensive.
 

Benchwayze

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Paul Chapman":2g6jlg0q said:
paulm":2g6jlg0q said:
[the shed has open eaves where the corrugated cement board roof meets the wall plate, and a fairly loose fitting door, so there will be continual air flow to some extent, rather than a fairly well sealed space that could be dried out reasonably well ?
I think air circulation is very important to prevent stuff going rusty. I keep all my tools in my garage which is unheated and gets very cold in the winter. However, there is fairly good air circulation caused by gaps around the up-and-over door and this helps prevent rust. I find that tools that are not covered up (such as my bandsaw and smaller tools kept on hooks on the wall) do not get rusty. Other tools which I had previously kept in cupboards (where there was no air circulation) tended to rust.

I find that plane sacks (such as those you received with your (green :mrgreen: ) Cliftons) are good for preventing rust.

Cheers :wink:

Paul
+1 for the up and over door.

Mine faces due south, so even in the winter, the slightest bit of sunlight on the metal door has a dehumidifying effect inside. The garage is also half-integral with the house. No heating, and no windows. The last point is a disadvantage! It's like a troglodytes hidey-hole in the late afternoon! :mrgreen:
 

paulm

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Thanks for all the suggestions guys, plenty to think about there.

It's interesting about the polythene sheets, cling film, or presumably pallet wrap ? I had thought of that and couldn't decide if it would actually cause a problem with condensation on the inside of the sheet/wrap and then dripping onto the table surfaces ?

I guess if the sheet/wrap is fairly tight to the surfaces and they have been treated first with something anyway, then there's not much scope for condensation underneath.

Tidying up the workshop yesterday I found a nearly full container of this stuff http://www.workshopheaven.com/tools/Shi ... 100ml.html I had forgotten I had it and haven't used it hardly before as I found it too sticky and stiff to work with, but reading the instructions (for a change !) I probably wasn't using it properly, doh !

Looks like that and some sheets/wrap might be the way to go ?

Thanks for all the ideas, and Paul C the cliffies and other smaller shinies are going into the house for the duration for safety and well being :) Strangely, swmbo doesn't seem to think I should do the same with the big stuff, women eh !!!

Cheers, Paul
 

timber

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Hi
I have a piece of STOCKINETTE MUTTON CLOTH that I soak i:e fill with a mixture of Vaseline and olive oil. Mixed in a bowl and when a custard consistency pour onto the cloth and wrap and then a good squeeze so that the cloth is well and truly saturated .
Wipe all the offending metal with that then just the cloth handy to give a quick wipe over. If woodworking use gloves, before touching wood you will have to be careful not to oil print it !!!!!!???
 

paulm

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Thought I might as well use some of that wax stuff I linked to above on the bandsaw table today. Not ready to move into storage yet but as I was cleaning up a bit anyway.

Reminded me why I hadn't used it much before, it's so stiff as to be near unspreadable, even though it's not particularly cold in the workshop, mild still really. I persevered and then had a lot of hard work to try and buff it after, even though applied as sparingly as I could given the consistency, it was very hard work and tedious to buff after.

I wouldn't try using it again without first heating the pot for a good while in hot water, and probably warming the table with a hot air gun too.

That's unless I just chuck it in the bin and get a spray can of something else instead !

Cheers, Paul
 

Hemsby

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Although a dehumidifier is of no use to you without electricity :( , If anybody is interested a “Desiccant” type dehumidifier will work very efficiently at temperatures as low as 1 deg Celsius.

I have used an EcoAir ECO DD322FW Desiccant Classic Dehumidifier
for the last couple of years =D> =D> .
 

HexusOdy

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I can't comment for tools but I have stored cast iron grill grates for a barbecue before which I suppose is the same principle. I'm I recall right I had to season them with a good coat of vegetable oil.
 
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