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sharpening skew chisels

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Derek S

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I was reading alfs review on the veritas skew jig for the veritas mk2 homing guide and she made reference to being able to sharpen skew chisels without the need to purchase the jig
Seriously though, you don't actually need it, any more than you needed the registration jig that came with the MkII in the first place.
can anyone explain to me how to do this as i only own 2 skew chisels http://www.yandles.co.uk/product.php/se ... RPOCHS-12L both left and right, so it seems a bit of a waste to purchase the jig if i can do it without.
 

Paul Chapman

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I just work out the projection and then make up a wooden stop block





That's the blade from the Veritas skew rebate plane.

Cheers :wink:

Paul
 

Jacob

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Derek S":3ix3a0fh said:
.... can anyone explain to me how to do this as i only own 2 skew chisels ,,,,,, both left and right, so it seems a bit of a waste to purchase the jig if i can do it without.
Just do it freehand. If it goes wrong do it again until you get it right. It's not rocket science - any fool can do it.
 

Cheshirechappie

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Something that slightly puzzles me about skew chisels is the skew angle that manufacturers put on them. The only use I can think of for which skew chisels are a real blessing is cleaning out the corners of lap and mitre dovetails, for which a skew angle of about 75 degrees would be fine. However, most of the skews I've seen in the catalogues or in the wild seem to be ground nearer 45 degrees. What use a 45 degree skew?
 

dunbarhamlin

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Cheshirechappie":2tlkragn said:
Something that slightly puzzles me about skew chisels is the skew angle that manufacturers put on them. The only use I can think of for which skew chisels are a real blessing is cleaning out the corners of lap and mitre dovetails, for which a skew angle of about 75 degrees would be fine. However, most of the skews I've seen in the catalogues or in the wild seem to be ground nearer 45 degrees. What use a 45 degree skew?
I find it useful for paring awkward protruberances (first shown to me for rounded over through tenons)

But, on the OP's query, must bear in mind that the precise angle of the skew really is of no moment, just < 80° for one style, and ~45° for the other so the most dyed in the wool jigger can wing it without a qualm.
 

Jacob

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Paul Chapman":3iol5ch9 said:
Jacob":3iol5ch9 said:
any fool can do it.
That figures :lol:

Cheers :wink:

Paul
I bet even you could do it Paul!

Seriously though - sharpening a small chisel freehand, skew or straight, is only slightly more difficult than sharpening a pencil. When all that is offered is one daft expensive gadget after another I start feeling that modern woodwork is in a very poor condition.
 

Paul Chapman

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Jacob":23nrwgca said:
I bet even you could do it Paul!
I do some freehand sharpening. For example, saws and shaped blades where guides and jigs are more of a hindrance than a help. For example, this is one freehand method I use to hone the shaped parts of beading cutters



However, I always use honing guides for normal plane blades and chisels because the results, in my experience, will always be better, so it seems pointless to me to do them freehand.

Cheers :wink:

Paul
 

Cheshirechappie

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dunbarhamlin":3no5sl0p said:
Cheshirechappie":3no5sl0p said:
Something that slightly puzzles me about skew chisels is the skew angle that manufacturers put on them. The only use I can think of for which skew chisels are a real blessing is cleaning out the corners of lap and mitre dovetails, for which a skew angle of about 75 degrees would be fine. However, most of the skews I've seen in the catalogues or in the wild seem to be ground nearer 45 degrees. What use a 45 degree skew?
I find it useful for paring awkward protruberances (first shown to me for rounded over through tenons)

But, on the OP's query, must bear in mind that the precise angle of the skew really is of no moment, just < 80° for one style, and ~45° for the other so the most dyed in the wool jigger can wing it without a qualm.
Thanks for the reply! I'd not come across that technique before.

I'm still not quite sure about the details, though. If I'm reading this right, the tenons are protruding through the job, perhaps as a decorative detail. They could be pared with an ordinary chisel, but to get a cleaner finish a skew cut helps. Tipping a chisel up at 45 degrees to the job would mean that at least one hand would have to be up in air, and not braced against the job, so there's a risk that the chisel's point could dig into the work. Using a 45 degree skew held about parallel to the table-top (or whatever the tenons are protruding through), with the point of the skew uppermost, allows both hands to brace against the job, present a skew cut to the tenon end, and eliminate the chance of chisel damage to the table-top (or whatever) because the chisel is working parallel to it. To do both sides of the tenon, it helps to have a pair of handed skews, and something like a 1/2" chisel would be a good size.

Have I got that about right?
 

bugbear

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Jacob":hhzttiuf said:
Derek S":hhzttiuf said:
.... can anyone explain to me how to do this as i only own 2 skew chisels ,,,,,, both left and right, so it seems a bit of a waste to purchase the jig if i can do it without.
Just do it freehand. If it goes wrong do it again until you get it right. It's not rocket science - any fool can do it.
Yeah - just give it your best try.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-19349921

:lol: :lol: :lol:

BugBear
 

Cheshirechappie

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dunbarhamlin":ykiemqd0 said:
Yep, spot on. Woodbloke showed me during a most enjoyable weekend spent picking his brains.
Thanks for that - another little nugget for the knowledge bank!

Ee's 'andy that Woodbloke bloke, in' 'ee? Mind you, if you spend a goodly chunk of your working life in the business, you're bound to pick up a trick or three. Fair do's to him for passing the tricks on.
 

woodbloke

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dunbarhamlin":1nlri703 said:
Yep, spot on. Woodbloke showed me during a most enjoyable weekend spent picking his brains.
Good grief Steve...that was some time ago. I'm surprised you can still remember the details through the alchofrolic haze! :lol: - Rob
 
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