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Scheppach plugs

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PokerG

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Hi all,

How do I plug my scheppach equipment into a standard UK 3 pin socket. My electrician says the shed rcd etc should be able to cope with the surge power generated by my tablesaw but I just need to find out how to plug it in. Round bit, square whole problem.

Anyone help?

G
 

WellsWood

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Hi G,
Which model saw? Larger ones may need a 16amp supply.

Cheers
Mark
 

ike

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Hello G,

Although the motor is rated 2.2kW or so I believe, the starting current is a bit high for a normal 13amp plug - could get a bit warm perhaps I don't know. Your best bet is your nearest electrical factor who can supply a 16A plug and wall socket (coded blue)for about a fiver or so.

(I forgot, + an inline socket for the extension lead to the machine)

cheers,

Ike
 

PokerG

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How do I wire it up?

I have 4 pieces of machinery that need wiring up, Dust Extractor, TableSaw, Planar/Thick and Drill Press. (For some reason the bandsaw doesnt use the round power thing that the others do)

Some will have a high startup current and although my RCD is supposed to work I just dont know. My electrician seemed to think it would.

But I dont think a 13amp fuse in the 3 prong UK plug would work. Anyone got any experience connecting them up?

As for the tablesaw it is the ts2500ci.

Do I just connect the round plug (that goes into the device) to a standard UK 3 pin plug? How hard are they to wire up?

G
 

RoyS

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Hi G - I had exactly this problem with my Scheppach table saw (2500) and planer-thicknesser. I had my 'workshop' (garage) rewired to give plenty of sockets for my gear. The electrician assured me that 13A was ample for the TS and PT - he was wrong! - they each blew fuses almost every time I powered them on. I had the electrician come back and now have a 16A circuit for the 2 'big' machines and use 13 A for everything else.

Also, given the new-ish regulations, I am pretty certain that this is a job for an electrician and is now not permitted for the DIY-er; others will be able to confirm this.

Best wishes - Roy
 

ike

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G,

Make up an extension lead - round plug (female) to round plug (male). Get the std 13A wall socket with the 16A wall socket. There is no inline fuse. Overcurrent protection is provided by the appropriate circuit breaker in your consumer unit. (I have a separate circuit with 16A breaker for (i) tablesaw and (ii)PT.

(This is my opinion and does constitute advice.
I am not a qualified electrician).

Ike
 

PokerG

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Oh, the plug doesn't appear to be the standard 3 pin round plug but some strange germanic contraption. Any hints on plugging that into a 16amp sucket?

G
 

PokerG

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To answer my own question, I am looking at the wrong end, the strange germanic end is the scheppach side.

I guess I just wire it up to a 16 amp male myself?

G
 

Scrums

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I've got two methods. I use a Scheppach combi and a Luna tabe saw which both draw more than 13a on startup.

One is pc - the other not !

non pc: Solder a 30mm panel pin where the fuse should go.........

pc: Use a blue 16 amp plug and socket....though the first method is obviously cheaper - and does work

Chris.
 

engineer one

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is this a new product, in which case surely the logic is to
get back on to NMA and ask them.

other wise, make sure that the plug fits into the machine,
then remove whatever is at the other end, and get your
leckie to fit a standard uk 3 pin plug. actually it might
be sensible to get him to fit a 16amp plug, which may or may
not be different from the normal 13 amp plug, having not
ever used one, i am not sure.

my dewalt table saw is soft start so does not need anything
other than 13 amp.

but first check with nma, and have a conversation with them.

paul :wink:
 

mrbmcg

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Hi

Unless you are "a competent person" you need a professional electrician to add a 16A (Round blue 3-pin 240 Vac) circuit, circuit breaker and a corresponding socket. It will probably be ok to run both machines of the one circuit unless you start them both at the same time, in which case the breaker may trip.

You then wire a 16A (Round blue 3-pin 240Vac) plug to the other end of the cable that came with your saw, and plug the black 2-pin job to the table saw.

B&Q sell both the sockets and the plugs these days, but your local electrical factor will have them too.

Note there are no fuses in such a circuit, a 16A breaker is fitted to the circuit in the consumer unit. This often confuses people. When you are using a 13A plug it is normally plugged into a socket which is on a 32A or 40A breaker. It is the 13A (or 5A or 3A) fuse in the plug which provides the current limit.

I had exactly the same problem with the TS4000 that I used to have and it drove me nuts changing fuses all the time with no apparent rhyme or reason to it. If you wire it up to a 13A plug and use it that way, make sure you have a steady stream of 13A fuses available. :?

Sorry if you knew all this already and I am teaching somebody to suck eggs.
 

engineer one

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hi bob thanks for the answer, it will help us all.

what ever we know there is always a little bit which adds to the
knowledge base.

paul :wink:
 

tim

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My TS2500 (soon for sale - when we move!) plugs into a 13a no prob. Think its tripped once in 4 years.

Cheers

Tim
 

Locton

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hi i have the scheppach 2500 & i plug into a normal 13amp socket but i have taken out the fuse & replaced it with 16amp fuse wire, it has worked every time & i have been using it like this for nearly two years now.

i belive someone from scheppach told me to do this when i bought the saw, i know it does not meet current regulations nor is it the correct thing to do. but until i get all the electrics changed in my garage come workshop it will have to do, although i am not completely happy using it like this.
 

dennyk

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I have the scheppach 2500CI, this replaced the 2500TS, I found out that when I had the 2500ts wired up to my workshop ring main with the normal 13 amp sockets, the table saw kept blowing the 13 amp fuse after this happened about half a dozen times, I decided to install a separate breaker into my power circuits and fitted the industrial 16amp socket and extension lead to match up with the socket on the table saw,

Problem solved the TS has never cut out since , total cost in the region of £30.00 and now I work safely

EDIT To clarify the above, this is the way my workshop electrics are laid out,

power into workshop has a dual pole switch, from that switch feed goes to
a twin breaker consumer unit and a single breaker unit.

the twin consumer unit is fitted with a 30 amp breaker for the ring main and 5 amp for the lighting, the single unit is fitted with a 20 amp breaker
and only feeds the table saw, which is fitted with a 16 amp plug,

Hope this makes things more clear
 

Pecker

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One point about using the "extention" lead/plug type arrangement.

The idea is that that the blue 16Amp plug uses a higher current than a standard plug, this means that more heat is generated. Thus the 16Amp plug should have a bigger cable than a standard 13amp plug can cope with or the wall socket. Failure to do so causes overheating.

This is why they (the socket part) should be hard wired in. It is quite safe and correct to wire a blue 16amp outlet in place of a twin socket in your ring main.

You do indeed need to be careful regarding "Part P" of the new regs. I really would suggest you bite the bullet and pay a sparky to come in and wire it for you if you are in the least bit hesitant, which you appear to be (no offence!).

The idea of converting the connection using the extention lead type scenario is OK for occasional use or an industrial machine that only uses little current.

One further point. Just remember your insurence company will not look on it lightly if you overload wiring...

mark
 

WellsWood

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Scrums":3crno8ck said:
non pc: Solder a 30mm panel pin where the fuse should go.........

Chris.
:shock: :shock: :shock: :shock: :shock:

On a par with twisting the bare wires together and wrapping with insulating tape I would have thought.

A 16A outlet wired into a 16A breaker on a dedicated circuit on your consumer unit with an RCD is the safe way.

I would echo other comments on here: if you don't know what you're doing, get it done by someone who does!

Mark
 

engineer one

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ah guys and there is the rub, are you sure the guy who says he can actually knows what he is doing???

in these days too many people use dodgy papers to claim they can
do certain things, often nicking a company registration for personal
use, so be careful, it is your life they may be playing with :twisted:

electrics are certainly an area where you need to know who the
workman is and what his references are.

paul :wink:
 

mrbmcg

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Pecker":2iwwc5y3 said:
This is why they (the socket part) should be hard wired in. It is quite safe and correct to wire a blue 16amp outlet in place of a twin socket in your ring main.
I don't actually agree with this Mark. Thinking about it for a second, you would have a 16A outlet on a 32A or 40A breaker (which is standard on a ring main) with *no* other current limiting device i.e. no fuse. This means that under fault conditions your device could take up to 40A for a short (or sustained period depending on the fault) time and potentially cause a fire.

I'm no expert, but this would be the equivalent of simply shorting out the fuse in a 13A plug with a bit of wire :shock:

It's my belief that you need a 16A circuit added to your consumer unit in order to limit the current which can be drawn by a fault condition.

If somebody knows better I'm willing to be corrected though. :oops:
 
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