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Safety and/or common sense?

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Phil Pascoe

occasional purveyor of blunt tools.
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:roll: I recently bought a bandsaw - I won't mention a brand, because it's probably no worse than anything else. Got some new blades from Tuff Saws =D> =D> and set about setting it up. Pursuing perfect safety, no doubt, the cover in front of the blade comes down so far that you can't see the guide wheels or the entry point of the blade without your eyes being at near table level.
Why make accurate adjustment and working nigh impossible in the interest of safety? My fingers are not going to be anywhere near the front of the blade, and it's not as if children are about to buy a bandsaw to play with! It was easily rectified with a junior hacksaw, but that's beside the point - how does making something difficult to use make it safer? I used to have a little three wheel saw that came with a safety guard - the first thing I did was remove it, because it was impossible to see past it. I never again saw the same machine anywhere that the owner hadn't done the same.
Don't the designers stop to think??
 

Richard T

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I expect that the designers are ruled by sets of mind boggling safety concerns demanded by people whos' job it is to "have concerns" rather than people who use such machines and know what is dangerous versus what is possible.

I never felt safe when using a chainsaw dressed up in all the stuff you are 'supposed' to wear ... can't see or move properly in all that kit.
 

tool613

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phil.p":k65uzn6l said:
I won't mention a brand, because it's probably no worse than anything else.
In terms of guarding this is just not so. to meet regulation consumer tool guards are junk.
Good guarding in not in the way. This of course is backed up with proper training.

phil.p":k65uzn6l said:
Pursuing perfect safety, no doubt, the cover in front of the blade comes down so far that you can't see the guide wheels or the entry point of the blade without your eyes being at near table level.
Surly the guard moves up and down? I do not see why you would need to see anything with a fence cut. For a line cut you raise the guard so you can see blade and line do you not?

Best practices and training go a long way in the proper use of guarding. Guarding is only to improve your chances of having all digits at the end of you career.

If you would like to see good guarding that has money spent on it look to Martin.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Wls3oH_NYM

jack
English machines
 

Jacob

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phil.p":bcuwmieh said:
:roll: I recently bought a bandsaw - I won't mention a brand, because it's probably no worse than anything else. .....
Well it certainly sounds worse in terms of guarding! On mine (352) the blade is well covered but there is a slit in the front of the guard which enables you to see the blade quite easily from square on - as you would be when lining up a cut.



Similar on a 301 I see; for-sale-startrite-bandsaw-t60957.html

Don't the designers stop to think??
Some do, some don't, your's didn't!

Another option found is the clear plastic cover, but these are no good - they get dusted over and in the long term they get scratched and opaque.
 

dickm

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.... and your 352 even has the wondrous mechanical interlocks! None of this fancy microswitch stuff - stop it dead with a big lump of steel :)
(mine's the same)
 
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