Please teach me about planes

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I suppose it's horses for courses.
Here's Peter's methodology for his green work, that chamfer is put there and the stock is allowed to dry for at least a month beforehand.
One thing I like about his videos is the workholding before things are flat enough to lay on the bench.


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He's alright, Follansbee.....A bit modern, but I suppose you can't have everything.
What's the chamfer thing that Ttrees refers too? Haven't time to sit though 1 hour of vids!
 
It's "timestamped" for convenience Jacob!
Sorry it's not in this case actually, so you will have to skip to where I've screenshot it.
 
My dad had a statement for false humility. When someone would talk and try to sound humble, he would say "me so humble...me so humble!" as meekly as he could. I try to be honest instead.
I'm guessing he didn't have one about the unattractiveness of needing to always be right and being arrogant ...
 
I'm guessing he didn't have one about the unattractiveness of needing to always be right and being arrogant ...

"self-praise stinks" and "pobrecita" were two of his favorites.

I used to be really good at math. I remember the first one coming due to that, or celebrating putting an approach shot way inside of his.

I think planing is important enough to learn to do it well because it's not difficult and it's easier to do it well than it is to do almost anything else. It's certainly far easier to do it well than it is to do it poorly and torture yourself with it and figure that there's some kind of magic woo with it.

Statements like the one earlier, risking ruining a piece and having to start over are a red flag that someone needs to hold their feet to the fire and do it right. The worst you'll ever have to do following a plane is finish sand the worst of woods.

when someone comes here to learn, I will speak up. the OP strikes me as someone here to learn.
 
It's "timestamped" for convenience Jacob!
Sorry it's not in this case actually, so you will have to skip to where I've screenshot it.
I see it. He's just marking the arris between his chosen best face and edge I presume. Standard practice one way or another
I'd do it like this with a 2B pencil, or crayon on sawn stuff, big and bold so even when most of it has been lost after mortices, rebates, mouldings etc I can still work out which is which. Feeble little squiggles no good. Sorta cursive F on the face, arrow on the edge, joined together

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I'll have to watch it through I didn't catch the "inner" bit.
Right got it! I marked the opposite corner.
Makes sense - without sawmill or pit saw then the way to deal with riven wood would be to reduce it close to finished size required and only then think of seasoning - which would be quicker and have minimal splitting and distortion due to the small dimensions. Also easier to "dimension" while it's still green. Very different from using sawmill sawn timber.
He's making one of these chests I presume PETER FOLLANSBEE: JOINER’S NOTES
 
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