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Peanut Connecting System

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Rorschach

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I think you’ll find the Lamello Invis mx2 is totally hidden the clue is in the title as they say.
You are quite correct, on the axminster site though it only has one 1 star review and the connectors are £5 each! It also requires a special tool to assemble and disassemble. Not really a comparable product.
 

Doug B

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You are quite correct, on the axminster site though it only has one 1 star review and the connectors are £5 each! It also requires a special tool to assemble and disassemble. Not really a comparable product.
I was merely pointing out for reasons of clarity that there was an invisible Lamello fixing you had said there wasn’t.

As to being comparable they both do the same job though admittedly at different cost, not that I have a foot in either camp as I own neither & can’t imagine I ever will.

Having watched Peters video I agree with him that nothings new, I seem to remember a metal version of the peanut fixing many years ago, it was T shaped & fixed with a screw & then located in a keyhole slot.
Having said that I’m not knocking the peanut system, a jig to aid alignment is always handy & it certainly looks well thought out.
 

Rorschach

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I was merely pointing out for reasons of clarity that there was an invisible Lamello fixing you had said there wasn’t.

As to being comparable they both do the same job though admittedly at different cost, not that I have a foot in either camp as I own neither & can’t imagine I ever will.

Having watched Peters video I agree with him that nothings new, I seem to remember a metal version of the peanut fixing many years ago, it was T shaped & fixed with a screw & then located in a keyhole slot.
Having said that I’m not knocking the peanut system, a jig to aid alignment is always handy & it certainly looks well thought out.
It was my mistake really for not clarifying I meant the lamello zeta machine/system really rather than lamello as a company. Like me saying festool instead of festool domino.
 

petermillard

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The @petermillard video showed the system with plywood - I wonder how good it is with MDF .... or (although I avoid it) chipboard? [I'm increasngly moving away from MDF too]
I show MDF at the end - it was designed with basic sheet goods like MFC and MDF in mind. The guy behind the system has a fitted furniture business, he put the system together specifically to overcome the shortcomings he found in other methods of construction. 👍
 

petermillard

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Re alternative invisible fixings, there’s the Lamello Tenso fitting for the Zeta as well, which is also totally hidden, but nothing like as strong, unfortunately - not a patch in the Clamex, or the peanut, frankly.
 

Mike Jordan

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I've watched the video, it's just a method that has been around for centuries and called slot screwing. It has been used for such jobs as fixing architraves on oak door frames and other areas where concealed fixings are needed.
The keyhole router cutters have been readily available for a long time.
It's just a rip off at £400'notes for a simple guide for the router you need to go with it.
Screwing or drilling into end grain or the edge of sheet materials is never a great idea for strength and I can think of plenty of jointing methods using a router that cost nothing and will work better than this rubbish.
What's next for a glowing recommend? I suggest the screw on plastic dovetaiil ! It's got to be a winner.







W
 

craigs

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I've watched the video, it's just a method that has been around for centuries and called slot screwing. It has been used for such jobs as fixing architraves on oak door frames and other areas where concealed fixings are needed.
The keyhole router cutters have been readily available for a long time.
It's just a rip off at £400'notes for a simple guide for the router you need to go with it.
Screwing or drilling into end grain or the edge of sheet materials is never a great idea for strength and I can think of plenty of jointing methods using a router that cost nothing and will work better than this rubbish.
What's next for a glowing recommend? I suggest the screw on plastic dovetaiil ! It's got to be a winner.







W
uh oh, you're going to be sent to coventry 😂
 

Rorschach

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I've watched the video, it's just a method that has been around for centuries and called slot screwing. It has been used for such jobs as fixing architraves on oak door frames and other areas where concealed fixings are needed.
The keyhole router cutters have been readily available for a long time.
It's just a rip off at £400'notes for a simple guide for the router you need to go with it.
Screwing or drilling into end grain or the edge of sheet materials is never a great idea for strength and I can think of plenty of jointing methods using a router that cost nothing and will work better than this rubbish.
What's next for a glowing recommend? I suggest the screw on plastic dovetaiil ! It's got to be a winner.







W
Don't sugar coat it now! lol
 

Mike Jordan

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Sorry I'm sold out of sky hooks until the next batch arrives from China.
What about a rubber hammer and a putting on plane ? They have a much better chance of working well.
 

Spectric

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Hi

Having watched the videos and thought about it MFI kitchens sprung to mind, for those old enough to remember. I think there is a fair amount of setup and playing around compared to the other systems out there. I clearly recal one of the Dominos selling points is that you take the tool to the work, this is back to the workbench. I can see a market for it though, you can throw an MDF kitchen together reasonably quick and will suit the flat pack market.
 

robgul

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I show MDF at the end - it was designed with basic sheet goods like MFC and MDF in mind. The guy behind the system has a fitted furniture business, he put the system together specifically to overcome the shortcomings he found in other methods of construction. 👍
Ah, must pay more attention - I'll watch it again from the naughty step.:)
 

Spectric

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Hi

Mike may have hit on a new concept, screw on dovetails. Take this a step further and you could have screw on dovetails on one side and screw on pins the other and they could come in long lengths that you just snap of the length required.
 

Spectric

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Hi

I have been looking at different jointing methods and have got some good advice and info regarding the Domino from people on these forums. I use a Dowelmax which produces good strong dowel joints but want something with less hassle for bigger jobs, for example my last cabinet used 132 dowels that required 264 holes. Looking at this peanut it is only suitable for sheet goods, it would not have helped me wheras a domino would have and can also handle the sheet goods. I am not a Festool fan and not loyal to any brand, best quality / suitable tool for the job attitude and my biggest issue with the domino is no competitive machines so no choice. Peter says there is a void between biscuit joiners and Lamellos/dominos but I think they are aimed at different markets. This peanut system cannot be classed as being used to produce high end cabinetry, the end result is a flat pack product wheras the domino and others can deliver a pre assembled cabinet. When I think of flat pack units, the bit that fails is that screw in pin that engages with the cam lock, it breaks out very easily and a flat pack kitchen only gets its strength from good installation and neighbouring units. If you want something to assemble later then I think the domino connectors certainly look stronger and better quality, ok they are £1 each but compared to that plastic peanut pin at thirteen pence, there is no comparison. The best thing about the peanut system in my opinion is the actual jig, that looks top quality and probably warrants it's £400 cost and that drill stop collar looks substantial. To conclude, from my perspective at the moment the Domino is the front runner, just line up and push, no clamping work down, no MFT workbench, no collection of parts to swap and change and a wider range of joints can be made.
 

Rorschach

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@Spectric I think you covered very well the most important in all of this discussion, different methods suit different jobs and material choices, there is no perfect option for everything.
 

Mike Jordan

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If all else fails try looking at the free on line copy of Riley's Manual of Carpentry and Joinery. ( my hard copy is dated 1950) Page 187 shows this system before it was reinvented in plastic.
 
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