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Cabinetman

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No, it just adds an extra complication in trying to get the fronts of all the panels level, the fridge freezer doors work in a different way to the sliders and they work in a different way to the hinged doors, and I really don’t envy you the job of sorting it all out,
i’ve been down the road of thin strips around the edges of the panels, and I agree I hate it as well. I stopped using veneered panels as much as I could but in this case I don’t think there’s much of an alternative.
A large gap between the doors which shows the frame beneath (old style) helps to disguise the problems of levelling but it totally reduces the effect you wanted to make, The large gap of course hides all the sins!
As the Irishman said "well sir I wouldn’t have started from here" sorry Ian
 

Snettymakes

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No, it just adds an extra complication in trying to get the fronts of all the panels level, the fridge freezer doors work in a different way to the sliders and they work in a different way to the hinged doors, and I really don’t envy you the job of sorting it all out,
i’ve been down the road of thin strips around the edges of the panels, and I agree I hate it as well. I stopped using veneered panels as much as I could but in this case I don’t think there’s much of an alternative.
A large gap between the doors which shows the frame beneath (old style) helps to disguise the problems of levelling but it totally reduces the effect you wanted to make, The large gap of course hides all the sins!
As the Irishman said "well sir I wouldn’t have started from here" sorry Ian
Thank you, this is valuable. I’ll have a think
 

Snettymakes

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Now that I’ve had a chance to wake up... We are now thinking that more traditional (at least, in line with what kitchen manufacturers push anyway) pantry cupboards would be simpler. So two cabinet doors in place of the 8 drawer fronts, and “hidden” low profile drawers inside. Less to line up, and no grid to add complexity.

I’ll draw up revised plans tonight and share.

Love the design process. Feedback from people with no preconceived ideas, and necessity forcing design changes invariably leads to a better, more refined design.
 

Snettymakes

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this solution requires a large amount of trim between the cupboards and the sloping ceiling to allow the door to swing open fully without contacting. I think the only way of avoiding that would be to move everything forward nearly flush with the front face of the sloping ceiling wall. If anybody thinks of an alternative, please shout.
 

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Doug71

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If you are talking about the door on the left you could hinge it on its right hand side using zero protrusion hinges and it would open almost flat back over the other doors, zero protrusion hinges open to 155 degrees.
 

Cabinetman

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As Doug says, or pull it forwards on runners like one of those larder units, the only other way is to do what you’ve done on the second row and put a horizontal line/joint in, perhaps sacrificing the triangular bit at the top.
 

Snettymakes

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If you are talking about the door on the left you could hinge it on its right hand side using zero protrusion hinges and it would open almost flat back over the other doors, zero protrusion hinges open to 155 degrees.
When you're too close to the project, it's easy what you miss 🙄. That's an option, but the wall to the left means that door should open with the hinge on the left for easy access. I'd rather sacrifice the slightly excessive trim than the usability of it. Function over form.

As Doug says, or pull it forwards on runners like one of those larder units, the only other way is to do what you’ve done on the second row and put a horizontal line/joint in, perhaps sacrificing the triangular bit at the top.
Believe it or not, it's the lower part of the triangle the contacts the sloping ceiling (according to my CAD program anyway) 🤷🏻‍♂️, meaning I'd have to sacrifice the entire triangle. I'd end up with a horizontal break that's not in keeping with the rest of the unit, but I should probably loosen up my OCD tendencies on this project.

Sliding the door forward on runners is definitely a contender.

Lots of food for thought.
 

Snettymakes

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Looks like I might have a bit of a problem sourcing melamine faced mdf/ply for the drawer bases. I figure I can veneer my own.

Would anybody suggest alternatives to melamine? Objective is spillproof durability
 

Cabinetman

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Well you probably haven’t thought of this, and you’ll probably think it’s a wierd idea but my kitchen cabinets have a layer of cushioned vinyl flooring placed on horizontal surfaces, deadens the noise, stops chips to the Melamine, and can be taken out to be washed, but I suppose you could glue them in, and obviously you could buy it in plain white as well. Ian
 

Snettymakes

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Well you probably haven’t thought of this, and you’ll probably think it’s a wierd idea but my kitchen cabinets have a layer of cushioned vinyl flooring placed on horizontal surfaces, deadens the noise, stops chips to the Melamine, and can be taken out to be washed, but I suppose you could glue them in, and obviously you could buy it in plain white as well. Ian
Some sort of liner (washable or disposable) wouldn't be a bad idea 🤔
 

Snettymakes

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Not much to update on this. Radiator arrived and was fitted, so the old one is no longer in the way (and the heating situation is much improved!).

I've revised the plan to remove the triangles from cabinets/doors, and replaced those awkward sections with a large wine rack, which I think is probably making the best of a bad situation really.

Cut list order is in for quote, totals 9 sheets, which makes me very apprehensive about the final cost of this 😞. It is what it is though 🤷🏻‍♂️.
 

TheUnicorn

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Well you probably haven’t thought of this, and you’ll probably think it’s a wierd idea but my kitchen cabinets have a layer of cushioned vinyl flooring placed on horizontal surfaces, deadens the noise, stops chips to the Melamine, and can be taken out to be washed, but I suppose you could glue them in, and obviously you could buy it in plain white as well. Ian
that's a good idea with a lot of uses in different places, do you have any issues with moisture trapped by the vinyl?
 

Cabinetman

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that's a good idea with a lot of uses in different places, do you have any issues with moisture trapped by the vinyl?
No I’ve had it in the kitchen cabinets now for seven years never had a problem. And of course when you take them out the cabinets look brand-new.
 

Snettymakes

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updated drawings

CA2CD8B2-499F-4A53-B082-E491AF4EA409.jpeg326D5523-5EF3-43A9-AF96-FAE316E97FAC.jpeg

i think I’ll update the wine racks. I’d assumed the common design, but yours is much simplr to make Cabinetman, so I’ll probably go with something similar
 

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How big is the refrigerator freezer that fits in there? There aren't a lot of them here in the 2' or less range unless they are little bar or hotel suit fridges. I'm trying to visualize how big the project is.

Pete
 

Snettymakes

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How big is the refrigerator freezer that fits in there? There aren't a lot of them here in the 2' or less range unless they are little bar or hotel suit fridges. I'm trying to visualize how big the project is.

Pete
Full size 50:50 split fridge freezer combo. They all appear to be about 54 or 55 cm wide. Ours is 54.
 

Doug71

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I know it's an awkward space that you are dealing with but the latest design is looking a bit like you have just used some standard sized cabinets from Howdens Joinery and filled in the gap that was left with a wine rack.

Could you maybe merge both designs and have a single depth wine rack running up the slope and keep the angled doors, I'm guessing that might give the extra clearance the angled doors needed to open? I think the angled doors would really make it look bespoke.
 

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Full size 50:50 split fridge freezer combo. They all appear to be about 54 or 55 cm wide. Ours is 54.
Ah there is my confusion. Ours are generally 60 to 90+ with the side by sides being at the wider end of the range. Your standard is what would sometimes be used in small suites or apartments. We had the room when building so have a separate pair of 80 each which is not common in most places.

Pete
 

Snettymakes

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I know it's an awkward space that you are dealing with but the latest design is looking a bit like you have just used some standard sized cabinets from Howdens Joinery and filled in the gap that was left with a wine rack.

Could you maybe merge both designs and have a single depth wine rack running up the slope and keep the angled doors, I'm guessing that might give the extra clearance the angled doors needed to open? I think the angled doors would really make it look bespoke.
yeah I’ve had to make some sacrifices to the clean bespoke design that I wanted. The design is pretty locked in now as the sheet goods are ordered. I have room for manoeuvre on the wine rack though.
 

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