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Pads for chair legs on wooden floors.

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Stevekane

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Same as above for me, the plastic,,,probably nylon, ones with the pin, they come in at least two disc sizes, around 12 and 20mm and pre drill the legs, our ones on dining room chairs on a quarrytile floor have lasted years without issue and the ones I nailed to our old garden table to hold it off the wet flags were still okay after 10 or more years. Reading the posts I wonder if there is a quality difference, as I said mine are hard nylon,,maybe cheaper brittle plastic ones are also available?
 

Bristol_Rob

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I've had trouble with felt pads slipping and I'm currently trailing a different method of application.
I use the same pads with the sticky and added a dab of yellow glue this time.
Left them for 1hr before applying weight and so far it has held 👍
 

Rorschach

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I've used the stick on type and the nail on type, you can get both in either felt or teflon/hdpe/nylon etc. Nail on definitely last longer and are easy to install.
 

JoshD

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PTFE glides screwed in (seems to holdeven though it's end grain)
 

JoshD

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Why not lift the chair when you want to move it?

Or is that being too logical?
Most people think it's ok to just pull a dining chair out from the table, sit in it, then slide it in. I guess you could try and persuade family and guests to do it differently ....
 

bluemoon

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Most people think it's ok to just pull a dining chair out from the table, sit in it, then slide it in. I guess you could try and persuade family and guests to do it differently ....
Same problem with our kids... "Silicone Chair Leg Caps Felt Pads" have worked well on our round dining chair legs (getting the correct size is the main issue, and they are not "invisible")..
 

Blaidd-Drwg

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I don't like felt because it picks up little pieces of grit and small rocks and drags them across the floor. I have tried hot gluing a thin piece of leather (smooth side down) and it doesn't seem to pick up as much.
 

Woody2Shoes

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If the legs are round-ish cross-section, I've used rubber walking stick ferrules (available in black, white, or brown) with success.
 

John Brown

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I get mine from B&Q.
They stock different sizes and shapes to suit. Search for chair leg glides.
I decided to go with self adhesive felt, accepting I will need to replace every so often. Bought some rectangular sheets of same from Screwfix, as all the branches nearby were out of stock of individual pads.
As for training people(especially grandchildren) to pick up chairs, rather than sliding them.....
 

furnace

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I think I got these at Lidl. I fitted them to kitchen chairs that are on a tiled floor and they are really good. They have a plastic base with an incorporated nail. The base has a recess into which is fitted a very tough felt. I used contact adhesive as well as the nail when fitting them to the chairs and they're just as secure as when I fitted them. The felt has compacted and worn a little, but the nail head is recessed within the base so I can't imagine the felt wearing down sufficiently to cause a problem without receiving a warning from the screeching that will precede it.
 

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