Oil finish for outdoor oak table

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SimonStevensCanes

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I'm looking for recommendations for finishing the oak outdoor table that I'm finishing up at the moment. Whilst I've never used Tung oil, I'm most inclined to it, however I don't have anywhere indoors to store the table during the weeks of finishing that I understand would be required. I could struggle and do so disassembled in the (small) workshop but it's unheated and sitting at about 10 degrees at the moment so I imagine that's going to lengthen the process considerably. I can heat the workshop temporarily but it's quite costly to do so.

I've used teak oil in the past, but if there's something more durable, then I'd prefer to beef up the protection.
 
recommendations for finishing the oak outdoor table
Nothing is the best solution, let it grow old naturally, unless you want to be a slave to re-doing it regularly, and with Osmo you need to read the small print:

"RECOMMENDED USE Osmo UV-Protection-Oil Extra is ideal for all vertical wood surfaces in outdoor areas: doors, windows, window shutters (dimensionally stable elements), carports, timber cladding, balconies, fences, pergolas, and summer houses (dimensionally unstable elements). Also suitable for bamboo poles (e.g. in screens)."
 
The lowest maintenance finish is no finish, and as said Osmo doesn't last on horizontal surfaces.
 
I'm looking for recommendations for finishing the oak outdoor table that I'm finishing up at the moment. Whilst I've never used Tung oil, I'm most inclined to it, however I don't have anywhere indoors to store the table during the weeks of finishing that I understand would be required. I could struggle and do so disassembled in the (small) workshop but it's unheated and sitting at about 10 degrees at the moment so I imagine that's going to lengthen the process considerably. I can heat the workshop temporarily but it's quite costly to do so.

I've used teak oil in the past, but if there's something more durable, then I'd prefer to beef up the protection.
I've used linseed on some softwood benches. It seems to work but goes black. It only takes seconds to splash it on, ideally early summer so it dries well.
 
OK here goes. All clear finishes on that application are rubbish. 2 years possibly 3. If you pleaded I would turn it around and make the table slats easy to sand/even removable. As that's easiest. Then I would use the really expensive sikkens filter7 and ths system in the darkest acceptable shade. Applied to the letter( sadolin is a substitute although not as durable.) This should last 3 years +.( complete coverage is best so finish it all disassembled)
 
I have an English oak table top, 4 planks, size about 2.10 x 0.8 m with a small gap between each plank. It lives outside in southern France, exposed to hot weather in the summer and some cold damp spells in winter. In winter it is covered with metal roofing sheets, weighted, supported on 3 cross timbers, 5, 10 and 15 cm tall, to give a water run off and to allow air to circulate between the table top and the metal sheets. Six years in, it is in great condition, it just has a yearly application of Danish oil, if I remember!
 

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OK here goes. All clear finishes on that application are rubbish. 2 years possibly 3. If you pleaded I would turn it around and make the table slats easy to sand/even removable. As that's easiest. Then I would use the really expensive sikkens filter7 and ths system in the darkest acceptable shade. Applied to the letter( sadolin is a substitute although not as durable.) This should last 3 years +.( complete coverage is best so finish it all disassembled)
I should have said that I expect to refinish annually. I just want the best combination of low maintenance and best protection (erring on the side of low maintenance).

I think I have realistic expectations of how an outdoor oak table will weather, I just want to add a bit of protection as it's so wet in the north of England. It sounds like there isn't a go to finish, so I'll pick up some more boiled linseed oil and go with that. Nice sunny day today, so hopefully I can get some boards finished and out in the sun.
 
I should have said that I expect to refinish annually. I just want the best combination of low maintenance and best protection (erring on the side of low maintenance).

I think I have realistic expectations of how an outdoor oak table will weather, I just want to add a bit of protection as it's so wet in the north of England. It sounds like there isn't a go to finish, so I'll pick up some more boiled linseed oil and go with that. Nice sunny day today, so hopefully I can get some boards finished and out in the sun.
Linseed oil works in terms of keeping the water off but out doors it's not really a "finish" and tends to go black. Easy to apply though, just brush it on, leave it a few hours to soak in and then brush it out thin if any left.
 
I used a cheap garden furniture finish on our softwood table and you can see that rain does bead up on it rather than soak in, however its my beleife that what kills timber is it getting soaked and then freezeing, so to that end I stack the garden chairs around it and a few bits and peices on top and put a polytarp over it all for the winter, after 3 years it still looking good.
Sikkens Filter7 is very good, I used it on my boat for years, just the top coat was fine and not the complete system, but its a “soft finish” and not terribly durable if anythings rubbing up against it, the beauty of it was that its very easy to rub down a patch and recoat it,
 
I use Deks Olje D1, which is a saturating oil. Give a very good finish and last well in all weather. Very easy to patch or reapply.
It’s designed for marine use
 
I'd echo what others have said about durabi
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lity of transparent finishes especially on horizontal exposed surfaces, the UV exposure alone will discolour the wood and likely degrade the finish over time.
Having said that I would recommend Tung oil which if applied thinned at least 60% with white spirit allowed to dry ~1-2 days in a warm-ish env and re-applied and finally finished with a neat coat applied with a cloth rubber you will get quite a durable finish that should last for quite a few years.
I used this technique on the Sapele frames of my workshop windows and whilst not totally exposed to the elements since they are under the eves they are still in pretty good shape some 10y later. A measure of how well this can seal the grain can be seen by these pictures of the end-grain of the cills, which are still pretty crisp and show no signs of moisture ingress - for sure lots of UV degradation but that's inevitable IMHO -
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Not extensively tried it on all year round outdoors wood …but Mikes Magic Mix …1/3 Tung Oil, white Spirit and Outdoor satin varnish dries well and may offer suitable annual protection
 
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I always get this question whenever I make an oak door. And guess what people don't like my answer! In fact as often as not they will do it anyway! People say yearly maintenance and what they mean is I'll do it just once....in its life because painting is expensive and boring. Then 1 year without bang its black and looks s%@t often much worse than a barn painted pine door ( barn paint bedec is very durable in my experience)
 
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