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DaleB93

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Hello,

I'm pretty new to woodworking although I've always found it enjoyable and messed around when Ive had the chance, and I did plenty of woodwork at school but now, after inheriting my Grandfathers tools and workbench, I want to get some use out of it all and be able to make items that would have market value. Most of the tools I've been given are whittling tools, a few chisels and shaping chisels, also an old Sharpie which somehow still works perfectly. I already had a lot of my own tools, such as tape measures, saws, rules, a bubble, drills clamps and hammers and I've managed to piece together a decent amount of wood that I could throw a few smaller items together with.

My grandad was really good at woodwork. He made shelves and tables and he made quite a bit of money making walking sticks, I'm always proud to show people what he did and I wouldn't mind following in his footsteps in woodwork. The help I need, is what could I make that will give me a good start in getting some work coming in? After all thats being going on lately with the virus, money would be a welcome change and for me not to at least try and earn something with what I've got, I'd have to be short of a fair few braincells.

Thanks for taking the time to read this, and apologies if I've not posted this in the right place. Its not often I write online let alone post in forums.
 

TRITON

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A box.

Required joining can be comb to make the sides fit securely to each other. A simple 6mm ply base, set into a groove for the bottom(a dado), and cut in hinges for the lid.

Then of course you can decorate or shape the lid as you see fit.

Comb jointed sides are very strong, and extends the glue line(the amount of wood that is glued together, and the comb is so strong no other fixing is required, other than glue.
Plus slightly over length you can sand back so its all flush, and the same for the lid, oversized by a couple of mil, and sanded back so it is flush all the way around.

You would usually use a router of dovetail jig with straight cutter- usually 1/2", but cutting them all by hand practices that hand and eye.
Cutting in the hinges teaches you that slightly off or not parallel leads to a squint lid, and its depth can have the lid close and be tight at the front, angled to the back until you figure out how deep to go so the whole lid is flush and level with the top of the box.

You will make mistakes and even the pro's do too, so never be disheartened.

Everyone has a use for a box.
If not comb jointed then through dovetails- A skill always best to practise practise practise. Even glued and pinned is good and strong, though comb jointing has more of a traditional look and it does look very nice in 4" high or 2' high.
For comb, all you need is a chisel(oh sharp, and a saw, and a ruler and a square...pencil, oil finish is easy as pie to apply, and highlights the grain is you have some hardwood.
 

Ttrees

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Welcome to the forum
I agree with Triton, boxes would be a good start if you want to think about making a bit of earning from.
It would get you to learn lots of skills, like hand planing which is the first tool I'd be focusing on, as it prepares the work for layout later.
It's the most fundamental tool, and out of any hand tool has the most to be learned from, and will lead you on a path of skill rather than buying your way out of things.

I would have a look at Rob Cosman, Phil Lowe, Mitch Peacock, Richard Mcguire(The English woodworker), David Chrlesworth, Frank Strazza, Simon James, and Matt Estlea to name but a few for some inspiration if you want to learn some good skills rather than sanding everything and choking yourself with power tools.

Hopefully you might see something of use on these channels, I mentioned these folks specifically as they are honest and not just saying somethings bang on, when it isn't.
I'm not saying I agree with all of them on everything, but a good starting place.
Neither am I suggesting you go out an buy a load of new tools, I suggest you study the use of the tools and figure out how you can do this to the same quality or better with vintage ebay or similar stuff.
You don't need waterstones, premium chisels, or ductile iron planes for example.

Rob Cosman has a very good eye for proportions, have a look at his wood hinge box for example, and never mind the sales pitches.
That's what I would first be making to see if they would sell.

Tom
 

Droogs

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Hi Dale welcome. 👋 What I am about to say is in no way intended to dis-hearten or put you off, just dispell any notion that what you intend will be easy or quick. Before you try this malarky with the intention of making money, you first have to be realistic. From reading your post your intention is to be a predominately hand tool (no electric tools) type of maker. The first thing you need to realise is that for all of human history that type of craftsman has spent 4 - 7 years in an apprenticeship to gain the relevant skills and level of quality to do so. It is acknowledged that it takes around 10 000 hours to gain these skills to be a truly competent.

Also unless you are already a trained toolmaker you will spend far more than you think to get a decent tool kit. Now you can make nearly anything with a hammer and a couple of chisels (1 wide and 1 narrow) using a bit of ingenuity and know how, but then you need to have the know how first :rolleyes:. But unless you have lots of time to spare it is not worth it. You do not need a large tool box but you do need the best quality tools you can get and that costs.
I have been bashing wood on and off for over 30 years, I did have to re-start around 7 years from absolute scratch (and I mean from living in a tent in a park with the above mentioned 2 chisels and a found hammerhead). So far I have spent just under £15K on tools in that time (bearing in mind my intention is to be full time making once again) and I still don't have all that I would like.

Please do not be put off by what I have said. This is a great skillset to learn and use for both pleasure and as a vocation. You will enjoy it, if you take a realistic approach and appreciate where you are on a very long journey of learning, practicing and then implementing successfully that which you want to achieve. I have no idea where Castleford is but other members will and I am sure someone local to you will be more than willing to help you along the way either to act as a mentor or as your phone a friend.

Be patient in your approach, take advantage of the opportunity presented by the time we live in and use its restrictions to your advantage. In essence I am saying learn learn learn before you take a major financial leap that you may regret later. Read through the 1000's of threads here to see the experience of others and to gain knowledge and What When Where How and most importantly Why it is all done as it is. Use Youtube but first find out who the good teachers are so you don't learn the unsafe habits of the bad.

I wish you every success in your endeavors and hope to see your WIPs and even How To's in the future.

best wishes

droogs
 

billw

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Welcome to the forum and I'll add a vote for a box. You get the choice of design, joints, can be done with simple tools that aren't expensive. Trick is in the skill. Make one and learn from it, do a second, learn from that. A lot of mistakes can be worked around. Some can't - I've still got a piece of wood marked out for dovetails with one saw cut in it - a cut on the wrong side of the line. It serves as a reminder.

The business aspect of it - my advice is find a niche that you;re both good at and has a market. Is there a need for a certain type of box for example? Caskets for cremated pets are a box for example and people love pets so might have a tinge of irrational spending about them.
 

thetyreman

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It depends what you actually want to make, if you get pleasure out of making walking sticks make them, if it's boxes make that, it's a good idea to specialise in something, it won't all be enjoyable but it's way better than working in an office, you've got nothing to loose, make sure it's something you enjoy making because you'll be doing it a lot.
 

stuckinthemud

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For me, its not the making that's important, its the selling that's the important bit. It's the reason I am a teacher, not a professional maker, I am an awful businessman. I can work hard, work quickly and produce work to a high standard, can't market, can't negotiate, can't close a sale, can't price my work, or find my niche.You need to be good at making money as well as good at making stuff in order to make a living.
 

stuckinthemud

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Simple, easy to make, good margins, confidence building? What about sawn disk animals and snowmen for the next few weeks, turned Christmas trees, etc. Chopping boards and bread boards can do well, I'm told.Put them on Facebook and Instagram
 
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Awac

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Hi Dale welcome. 👋 What I am about to say is in no way intended to dis-hearten or put you off, just dispell any notion that what you intend will be easy or quick. Before you try this malarkey with the intention of making money, you first have to be realistic.

So far I have spent just under £15K on tools in that time (bearing in mind my intention is to be full time making once again) and I still don't have all that I would like.

Please do not be put off by what I have said. This is a great skillset to learn and use for both pleasure and as a vocation. You will enjoy it, if you take a realistic approach and appreciate where you are on a very long journey of learning, practising and then implementing successfully that which you want to achieve.


Straight good advice from Droogs.

The only thing I would add, is that you say your Grandad liked carving sticks and that you have a few carving tools. Woodwork has many disciplines, one I enjoy is carving spoons, you don't need much to start and it teaches you a surprising amount of skills, from sharpening (believe me, carving with a blunt knife is NOT fun) to how the wood reacts etc, and also improves dexterity.

Buy the book Swedish Carving Techniques by Wille Sundqvist, read it and have a go. Look on line with the words green woodworking and Sloyd.

If you get the wood bug, great take it further and branch (ouch, pun) out into something else , but it will cost and take time, and good money comes from having a name. Small carvings, spoons, pendents etc are a good place to start.
All the best.
 

Jameshow

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You don't need to spend a fortune on tools.

I'd suggest you need 3-4 chisels £10.

Saw X2 £12 - course hand saw and a fine tenon saw

Plane no4 £20 second hand Record or Stanley or new Faithfull are cheap but ok quality (block plane is nice too)

Combination square 12" I like the bahco one. £10

Set squire £5

Marking gauge £10

Marking knife. £5

Mallet - make one as your first project.

Work bench you can make one for £50.

Vice £20.

Cordless drill (which you probably already have)

Sundries

Cheers James
 

Ttrees

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Errrr, WTF is a ductile iron plane and what makes it so special?
Nothing special that I can see, apart from knowing it won't break if its hits the floor.
That's the only advantage which a premium hand plane has over a good ol user.

You might come across Chris Schwarz smash an old no.3 with a hammer to demonstrate this if you look around.:eek:
I doubt it was by choice though.
Tom
 
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MusicMan

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All of the above. But why not start with walking sticks? Sounds like you have the tools already; if you don't have a drawknife they are not so costly; and you will be carrying on the tradition of your grandfather. Drawknife and whittling are skills to be sure, but they depend on training your eye and your hand, and you could get good at them quite quickly. And you might find a market niche there.
 
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Cabinetman

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You don't need to spend a fortune on tools.

I'd suggest you need 3-4 chisels £10.

Saw X2 £12 - course hand saw and a fine tenon saw

Plane no4 £20 second hand Record or Stanley or new Faithfull are cheap but ok quality (block plane is nice too)

Combination square 12" I like the bahco one. £10

Set squire £5

Marking gauge £10

Marking knife. £5

Mallet - make one as your first project.

Work bench you can make one for £50.

Vice £20.

Cordless drill (which you probably already have)

Sundries

Cheers James
James is absolutely right you don’t need to spend a fortune. Some of the really expensive handtools might be nicer to hold and to look at but basically they do the same job as a reasonably priced tool will. I needed a new set of handtools when I was in America last year and picked what I wanted from Axminster (which was delivered within a week – excellent service.) I already had the plane and chisels and the whole lot came to £130 – I am a Cabinetmaker and they are perfectly good enough for me. Ian
 

johnnyb

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just choose something that you can make in a weekend and crack on. when I first got interested in woodwork I read a book from the 40s or 50s something like every boys workshop companion.it had a tool list in it...even in the 70s the prices and amount of stuff seemed huge. ( I was only 8) now I could buy all of it used for £100 or so.
 

XH558

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Nothing special that I can see, apart from knowing it won't break if its hits the floor.
That's the only advantage which a premium hand plane has over a good ol user.

You might come across Chris Schwarz smash an old no.3 with a hammer to demonstrate this if you look around.:eek:
I doubt it was by choice though.
Tom
So ductile Iron planes are basically for clumsy b u g g e r s who are likely to drop them???;);););)
 
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