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Nesting Doll

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UKTony

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My daughter has just been given a set of Russian dolls very pretty, look to be made of Lime, now they are obviously turned on a lathe, however google doesnt throw much up as regards the process, i assume the head is made first then made to fit the body, anyone have any clues or has attempted one???

Tony
 

Taffy Turner

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Sorry Tony - can't help you there mate.

Bit of a tricky hollowing job that - you would have to get the walls pretty thin, otherwise you would only have a couple of dolls nested before the thing got too big. Beyond my hollowing capabilities I'm afraid!
 

mudman

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Tony,

Try here: http://russian-crafts.com/nest/make.html

And from here: http://www.rusfolkart.ru/eng/6/dolls.html

You can get:

How to make a matreshka

The wood for matreshka production is dried for 4 to 5 years. The wood is then sawed into pieces that are sent to the turner's workshop. The turner turns out matreshka forms on the lathe, beginning from the smallest one. Then beginning at the bottom of each doll he makes a so-called "lock ring," a recess hollowed out inside the upper part of the doll corresponding to a projection on the bottom part. This technological method allows the both parts of the doll to be tightly joined. The form is smoothed with sandpaper in preparation for painting.

Painters usually start by covering the form with starch glue to make an ideally smooth surface and to prevent paints from spreading. The first stage of the painting, called konturka, is the process of drawing the contours of the figure on the surface. Then the figure is painted with multi-colored paints. This stage is called pestrezhka. If necessary highlights are painted on the surface, a stage called blikovka. After every stage of painting the matreshka is dried. Then it is vanished with several layers of lacquer. If oil-based lacquer is used, there is a long drying time between each coat nitro-lacquer has a faster drying time, but it does not give the smooth, shiny surface and it can be hazardous.

Alexander Grekov
You are right though, there does seem to be a dearth of information on the web.

Interesting from the above that the smallest is turned first.
 
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