Marples No2200 square restoration questions

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Nick_

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I’m still going through some inherited tools and would like some advice on a Marples try square.

The handle and face plate look like they will clean/polish up fairly easily, but the blade is completely trashed.

Before I start at it are there any pointers on the best way to go about? Also, for the blade, I couldn’t tell if it was screws on the face plate or punch pins in the handle that held it in place.

Some pictures:
 

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They are two a penny, or two a fiver perhaps. Bin it unless you are desperate. But the blade only needs the outside edge to be square with the stock, so if you clean up the faces it might be usable.
 
Change the blade and pins holding it and you have lost more than 50% of the original. Have you heard of Trigger's brush?

Centre punch the pins and drill them out progressively on a drill press until they are removed. That will allow the parts to separate. Buy brass stock to make new pins. Loctite it in if you do not want to peen it.
 
...the blade only needs the outside edge to be square with the stock...
I was told once, and it makes sense, that squares with wood stocks (the handle bit, for those new to the terminology) and brass binding were reliable only on the side with the brass. Thus, the inside edges in this case. Wood moves. I've still got some wood/brass try squares, but only because they're pretty. The try squares I use or would use (mostly, I use combination or double machinist squares) are all metal, or metal with wood inserts in the stock. Those are more stable and more likely to stay accurate once adjusted to accuracy.
 
I think it would be possible to replace the blade but would it be worth it. I have an old marples square like that that just hangs on the wall because I like the look of those. It's long since gone out of square but I can't bring myself to chuck it out as it was the first square I bought.
That said if you want to take on a labor of love then give it a go.
Regards
John
 
I was told once, and it makes sense, that squares with wood stocks (the handle bit, for those new to the terminology) and brass binding were reliable only on the side with the brass. Thus, the inside edges in this case. Wood moves. I've still got some wood/brass try squares, but only because they're pretty. The try squares I use or would use (mostly, I use combination or double machinist squares) are all metal, or metal with wood inserts in the stock. Those are more stable and more likely to stay accurate once adjusted to accuracy.
I've been regularly using the same one for about 50 years. I've probably checked and adjusted for accuracy once or twice. It's easy to do - draw a line, turn it over draw another line and see if they coincide. Then file or stone the outside edge if necessary. You only use the outside edge for marking.
Mine has a particular advantage in that the 4" blade is quite wide and the square will sit on the workpiece without falling off. Sounds trivial but if you are doing a big mark up it becomes very handy to have it stay where you put it.
 
To comply with B.S. it's the inside that's tested.
:LOL: I doubt the wood handled ones were ever made to a BS, but if you are right it's irrelevant as you only use the outside edge for marking.
n.b. this is not rocket science!
 
I too was taught/told to mark-up using the outside edge of the blade and more times than other do use that. But I just occasionally find I have to use the inside. Also if I'm checking a second face is square to the first, for example if I am planing a batten, then I invariably use the inside edge of the blade - how would you do it otherwise?
Anyhow if the edges of the blade are parallel to each other then there is no difference which edge you use. But only make/expect them to be square to the brass edge of the stock.
All this of course is only IMVHO.
Martin
 
I....I'm checking a second face is square to the first, for example if I am planing a batten, then I invariably use the inside edge of the blade ...
Check if it's square on the inside, if not use another one. It's difficult to adjust the inside edge and not worth the bother, but for most purposes a slight error will be negligible.
 
Buy a new one (you can get for about £20) instead of keeping an out of true rusty pockmarked item - it will never feel good or easy to use
 
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