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March 2012 Challenge ( Upload Images Here) A Tazza

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Blister

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Hi everyone, out project for the 2012 March Challenge is A Tazza (Cake stand)

Our Judge for March will be Paul

Must be New work for this Challenge

The Tazza must be made in 3 components ( Base / column / Top cake presentation platform )

Must be no more than 8 inches high , any diameter

Any wood type

All components are to be lathe turned and made of wood ,

You are allowed to use glue for the assembly of your entry after photos have been taken

Colouring / texturing / burning / piercing allowed

Any entry's that are outside the rules and requirements will not be judged

Paul’s Criteria:
It has to be fit for purpose and hygienic as it will be for the presentation of food
I don't mind if people want to use decoration but form, function and finish will be top of my list when judging.


The Judges decision is final ( Any negative comments re judging must be via PM only and not on the open forum )

NO Critique or comments on any work until April Please, After the Judging and results.

Please state wood type if known, dimensions and a little about how you made it and what tools and finish you used ( this helps the judge )

Please post 3 images of your work / entry

1 showing all 3 elements of you entry prior to assembly / construction / gluing
1 showing your entry assembled
1 showing your assembled entry with a cake on top ( Mmmm Cake )

Image size please use image size 640 x 480 0.3 mp, same previous months

When your entry is ready please go to our new scoreboard http://ukwturningcomp.co.uk/

Log in to your account and mark yourself as ready by 10 pm on the 27th March after this time the scoreboard will be locked

Entry’s to be uploaded from 10pm on 27th March up until 10pm on the 29th March. after this time the thread will be locked for Judging

Results will be given on or before 31 March
I hope you all have fun with this challenge , Good luck
 

boysie39

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March challenge 129.jpg
March challenge 125.jpg
March challenge 131.jpg
This is my entry for March 2012 challenge , The wood used is Black Walnut for top and base and Walnut for the spindle.
I used a 12mm bowl gouge ,a 10mm spindle gouge and a 25mm round scraper at various angles to form the top and base . I sanded to 400 grit used two apps. of S/S each cut back with 0000 wire wool ,and finished with two coates of Woodoc 20 let dry for a few hours between coats and then buffed with paper towel. The under side is finished to the same standard as is the base .
Decoration was kept to a minamum just a few beads on the spindle . As the piece is a display stand I feel that nothing should be done to it to take your eye from what it is displaying .(although the cake I have on it could do with some help).
Sorry dims. are top 250mm
Base 150mm
Height 195mm
 

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dennisk

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Tazza (or something similar!) in wormy butternut and quilted maple. Turned the top and part of the bottom of the top on the screw and then mounted in the cole jaws to finish and to drill the hole for the tenon on the middle bit. Turned the bottom on the screw and then mounted in the cole jaws to finish it and drill the hole. Turned the middle bit between centres. Danish oil as the faces were done sanded(320 power sanded) and let dry and then a second coat applied and burnished with the applying cloth.Buffed up with the Oneway wheel set, brown white and then wax.7 1/2" high and 10 1/2" in diameter. Roughing gouge, 1/2" and 1/4" bowl gouges, parting tool to do the tenons, and skew to help tame the gnarly grain on the middle bit.
Very Gingery Ginger Cake with vanilla glaze. Even better than ginger snaps!
 

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Hesh

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Well here is my entry for this month and another one I enjoyed as it combined both face plate and spindle work. It also got me thinking about holding the work in various ways. The idea came from a photo on the internet but unfortunately I can’t give the originator any credit because I haven’t been able to find it again so apologies for that.
The piece is American Black Walnut and Sycamore and is 26cm wide by 16cm high. The inlaid band is 20cm in diameter in is 9mm wide and 5mm deep.
I started by turning the base which was mounted on a glue chuck using hot melt glue, the recess was turned and the spigot on the stem was then turned to fit. I then brought up the tail stock and turned the Base and stem as one to ensure everything was aligned. The grooves were cut to disguise the join and another spigot was turned to fit the top. Using pin jaws the underside of the base was then trued up and finished.
The top was initially turned using a faceplate with a sacrificial wooden disk glued to the top to try and keep away from screw holes. It was shaped and then another recess was turned to accept the spigot from the stem and then reversed again using the pin jaws. The groove for the band was then cut and the actual ring was cut in one piece with a slight taper to allow for any minor discrepancies. It was then glued in and left overnight to dry before the top was finished (very carefully)
Tools used were: Long Ground Bowl Gouge, Parting Tool, 3\8” Spindle Gouge, Roughing Out Gouge, Shear Scraper and Three Point Tool.
The piece was sanded to 600 grit and finished with food safe oil and pure beeswax on the top and everything else had three coats of Hard Wax oil and then buffed using the Chestnut System (third wheel only on the top).
I can’t lay claim to making the Cake which is shop bought (well we all have our limits don’t we)


Steve
 

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nev

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Idigbo and cocobolo, stem simply done between centres with spindle gouge(s). Base and top started off on glue chucks with mortices for the spindle tenons turned. duplicate tenons to stem made , held in jaws of chuck and used to remount base and top. bowl gouge , round and flat scrapers used to shape. sanded to 400 and then MM, finished in shellac. It can be used either as standard cake stand or upside down for presenting smaller 'cup' cakes or crudities if you're posh.
approx 120mm tall, 250mm diameter

tazza components.jpg


tazzawithcake.jpg


tazza.jpg
 

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henton49er

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Here is my entry for the March competition – a Tazza cake stand.

The first item turned was the stem from a small piece of wild cherry. This was turned between centres with a ¾” roughing gouge and a 3/8” spindle gouge, making spigots for assembly of the whole tazza. [The spigot at the top of the stem was sized such that the recess required matched that to mount the top plate of the tazza onto my chuck.] The piece was then hand sanded from 120 to 600. Grooves were then added using a point tool and burned by applying a formica strip to enhance their look. The red decoration was added using an iridescent oil paint stick with the lathe spinning. The whole piece was allowed to dry before spraying with gloss acrylic lacquer (2 coats). The stem is 150mm in height (plus spigots) and a maximum of 42mm diameter.

The second piece turned was the top out of a piece of sycamore. The piece was mounted on a glue chuck and the underside turned with a ½” bowl gouge. A recess to fit my chuck jaws and to take the spigot on the top of the stem was made and a highlighting groove was cut and burned as for the stem. The piece was then parted from its glue mount and reversed onto my chuck using the recess. The top was then trued up using the ½” bowl gouge. A small (1.5mm high) lip was created using a 6mm parting tool and the plate area made flat using the bowl gouge and a 2” square ended scraper. Detail grooves were cut and burned on the lip and on the side of the platter. A small copper spot was added to the centre of the top using gilt cream. The top was power sanded from 120 to 600. The top surface was finished with Chestnut Food Safe finish (4 coats) and the underside and edge with two coats of microcrystalline wax. The platter is 220mm diameter and a maximum of 18mm thick at the centre.

The final piece turned was the base, also in sycamore. The piece was mounted on a glue chuck and turned with the ½” bowl gouge. A recess was made to take the spigot on the bottom of the stem. The piece was sanded from 120 to 600 and burned grooves and red iridescent decoration added as described above. The piece was then parted from the glue chuck and the underside sanded from 120 to 240. The base was finished with two coats of gloss acrylic lacquer as for the stem. The base is 100mm in diameter and a maximum of 18mm thick at the centre.

The three pieces were joined using Titebond II glue. The overall tazza is 190mm high, and the third photo shows it holding a 7½ ” (190mm) cake.

The cake is a Victoria vanilla sponge cake, filled with homemade raspberry jam and whipped cream. It was made by me (under supervision from SWMBO) and within 2 hours of photographing it was gone! Sorry – but it was nice; mmmmmm!!

Mike
 

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Wildman

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Entries look really good. I had intended entering this however being new to woodturning made very basic mistakkes with the timber, (It was greener than I have been led to believe) followed by me being dragged off to hospital and only returning today, all I can offer by way of some form is the one pickure of three parts all split to twittery prior to assembly, and no time to bake a cake so failed in all respects, however not being one who is afraid to show failures here it is.


 

monkeybiter

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My effort for the month, quite pleased with this one for a change.

Top Maple, stem and base Oak.
For strength I have turned the stem with a tenon on either end [25mm top, 30mm base] and it's a good snug fit, I'm not going to glue it so that it can be disassembled for storage[we don't eat cake every day :( ]
Stem simply turned between centres, Oak grain filled with multiple layers of Melamine laquer for hygiene.
Base started on the chuck, underside finished on pine stub mandrel in chuck. Again, Oak grain filled with Melamine.
Top turned on chuck, beginning with spindle gouge, then 3/4" scraper, 1 1/4" skew as scraper [for the width], then final flattening with a straight batten with abrasive taped to the edge, held against the face while spinning.
I didn't want a raised lip to get in the way of the cake slice/spatula, so added a 'crumb groove' to cut down on spillage. It is round bottomed so it is easy to clean.
The Maple took a very good finish prior to laquering with Melamine.
All surfaces were primed with 50:50 celulose:Melamine, prior to laquering. Abrading was wet and dry to 400, then fine wire wool [0000?].
6 3/4" Tall, 11 1/2 top dia., 10 1/2" inside crumb groove, base 6" dia.
P1080449bk.jpg

P1080451bk.jpg

P1080466bk.jpg


Edit: Photo's replaced as originals were too dark.
 

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duncanh

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I originally decided that I wouldn't be entering this month due to lack of time, suitable wood and inspiration. However, I found some of each so here it is...

The base and top are made from ekki (something I've never encountered before, but found in the sale items at a recent demo). It's quite dense which makes the tazza heavy and stable.
The stem is made from hornbeam, which is becoming one of my favourite timbers.
Top is 15cm diameter.
Base 11cm.
Total height (without cake!) 10.5cm.
Finish is Ikea food safe oil and beeswax/carnauba wax mix.

Turning started with gouges but the ekki is tough so a lot was done with pull cuts and shear scraping. Bevel rubbing didn't work well at all. The oil was applied followed by wax which was worked in using paper towel. The grooves on the underside of the top and the topside of the base were done using a v gouge in a Dremel carving shaft. The groove on the top is for decoration and will hopefully act as a crumb catcher.
The stem was turned as usual and then the spiral was applied using a Kutzall round grit file which was a bargain at only £6.95 + p&p. The grouves were then sanded.

(the cake is, unfortunately, not home made)
 

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Alli

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Hi, This is my cake stand entry.

This was a prototype made out of some left over oak, sadly work commitments meant I ran out of time for making another, which I was planning to make out of different timber. It is 200mm high by 200mm diameter. Sanded from 120 to 600, Finish with food safe polish and a couple of coats of wax.

Thank you to Lisa who made the coffee and walnut cake for me. Even if it did disappear straight after I took the photos.....Hmmmmm

Unassembled stand.jpg

Assembled Stand.jpg

Stand with Cake.jpg


Another great and enjoyable challenge,
Cheers David
 

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Wood spoiler

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Here's my Cake!

It is a Victoria Sandwhich made with my own Hens very bright golden eggs mmmmmmmmmmmm (sorry it had to be quality controlled to allow a photograph to be taken). Oh yeah, I nearly forgot ....

by the way it is accompanied by my Tazza Cake Stand made in Cherry. Being a fruit wood I felt it would be entirely appropriate for intended use. It is 10" across and 8.5" across the cake face area to suit my 8" sponge tins. It stands 3".

Whilst I understand that others may not get where I am coming from the idea in my head was the flowing tablecloth and how it bellows out over the table so the scalloped edge is intended to be the movement. Hey ho that is my take anyway.

I photographed the underside in the components so you can see both top and bottom aspects. The overrall effect of the excavated underside of the base is to provide a delicate feel from the stand to reflect the glass stands that were my inspiration source on t'interwebs. The concave surface is designed to give support to a baked cakes risen form and resistance to any cake from slipping off the edge but allowing access without catching the edge of the cake stand. The edge can be held whilst removing cake making it hygenic in use.

The finish is Beall buff finishing with wax making it hardwearing and food safe.







I enjoyed the challenge. At least I have an idea of what a Tazza is now!
 

cambournepete

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Here's mine.
I'm a bit short of "proper" wood at the moment so the top and bottom are pine (from an old bench leg) and the middle is some random bit of boring brown wood. It's about 10" diameter 6" high. The finish is the Chestnut Food Safe oil.
The faceplate turning was done using Crown normal and Ellsworth bowl gouges, the spindle turning a 1" roughing gouge and 1/2" spindle gouge, with a smidgen of skew to size the spigots.
tazza1.jpg

Here's the stand:
tazza2.jpg

And the cake:
tazza3.jpg

I have to confess the cake was not made specifically for this challenge. It's a Christmas cake made by SWMBO that has been maturing since October 2010 and will hopefully be used for her birthday in May. Apparently it needs a drink though :)
 

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Haldane

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Made from softwood this cake stand is 7" dia and 6" tall, sanded to 400 grit and finished in chestnut's food safe oil.








Dave
 

tudormaker

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This is my effort for this month. 5.5" high the tops diameter is 9.5" and the base is 4" wide at the bottom and 2" at the top.
The base and stand are made out of Horse Chestnut, slightly spalted.
The top was part of a side table that was at my mums, the wood type is unknown but it was made in Thailand.
The spiral part of the base was done on the lathe with a saw, carving tools and lots of sanding.
The finish is a shellac based sanding sealer and Walnut oil, all food safe.
The cake was made by the boss, I made the flowers out of sugar paste.






Terry
 

steadyeddie

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Hi all, this is my entry for the cake stand / tazza challenge. All three pieces are American maple. Initial mounting for the base was on a screw chuck to "clean up" the bottom of the base, then re-chucked to form the main shape with a 10mm gouge. More or less the same for the top section, but because it has a flat face and a narrow rim, it was held in a plywood jam chuck to allow me to form the curve to the underside using the same 10mm gouge. The column section was turned between centres using a 10mm spindle gouge. 2 coats of sanding sealer followed with an appropriate finish, buffed on the lathe.


Cheers for now, Dave
IMG_1060.jpg
IMG_1075.jpg
IMG_1080.jpg
 

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jumps

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A good challenge subject (new for me again) with a great twist - my wife actually likes it!

Sycamore and an old oak table leg provided the materials, some as the 19mm infills.

Whilst the base was originally turned on 7 centres (screw chuck), to try a create 6 legs, this proved beyond my capabilities to produce sufficiently matching ones and they were turned off after due consideration! 3/8th bowl and spindle gouges used on base and top together with 19mm forstner bit and parting tool to clean up the recesses.
Spindle turned between centres with 1" skew and 3/8ths spindle gouge.
Finish was food safe oil after sanding to 400 then beeswax.







I have to admit I didn't make the cake - however I will make up for this by eating it.

Edit - getting back in I realised that I had accidentially set the camera to the wrong manual white balance (stupid buttons on the back) for the first shot posted and have re-shot and posted now. In addition I didn't mention dimensions; they are base 180mm, top 290mm, height 200mm. I can also now confirm the cake tastes rather good...
 

RogerBoyle

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Here is my attempt at this month’s challenge

I Made this one from Softwood as the first one i did (Cherry) decided to split after It had been finished :evil: :evil:
Tools used was a 1 " Skew and two sizes of gouges a 19mm and a 10mm
It measures 190mm across and 170mm tall (7 1/2 " x 6 3/4" )
Sanded to 400 grit then two coats of Walnut oil followed by pure beeswax on the lathe
The cake is a cheap victoria sponge from Sainsbury’s..

Lessons learnt from this exercise was the need to buy some better quality gouge's and to practise face plate/chuck work

Roger
 

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Hudson Carpentry

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Made from Iroko I turned this using a Gouge, Bowl Gouge and Skew. Its finished with friction polish.

Ill be honest as you can't see from the pictures the two catches. As normal it was a last minute thing and while doing the underside of the top I had quite a large catch which resulted in quite a chunk missing. I tried to turn it out but it happened again. I sanded it the best I could as I didn't have time to do a new one.

It measures 6 1/2" diameter by 4 1/2" tall.

Tazza-1.jpg

Tazza-2.jpg

Tazza-3.jpg
 

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woodntings

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Here is my entry for this month.
Its made out of Mahogany, 9 inches wide and 8 inches tall.
I have to admit it was rushed as I'm a bit short of free time at the moment. the main dish was turned in my K10 chuck with O'Donnell jaws using a bowl gouge, flat and round nose scrapers. sanded to 600 grit and food safe oil applied.
The base again was turned using O'Donnell jaws, a spindle gouge and round nose scraper. sanded to 600 grit and finishing oil applied.
The stem was mounted on a screw chuck and turned with a spindle gouge, sanded to 600 grit and again finished with finishing oil.
The cake is the best bit, Gunniess Chocolate cake made by SWMBO. It tasted great.. :)

Thanks

Ben
 

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