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isaac3d

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It is a granberg small log mill that clamps to the chainsaw bat, with a flat surface made from some cheap 2x4 for the first cut. It is a huge amount of fun milling, but waiting for it to season is frustrating!

Interesting! Not nearly as expensive as I had imagined.
 

alex robinson

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Interesting! Not nearly as expensive as I had imagined.

The mill is quite cheap, and pays for itself fairly fast. It is hard on the saw though, so you need a fair amount of power. 65cc will let me cut boards 18" or so (slowly). For the big stuff you see some people posting pictures of you need 90 - 120cc which is seriously expensive
 

Adam W.

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The mill is quite cheap, and pays for itself fairly fast. It is hard on the saw though, so you need a fair amount of power. 65cc will let me cut boards 18" or so (slowly). For the big stuff you see some people posting pictures of you need 90 - 120cc which is seriously expensive
Yes they are expensive, but judging by the price of timber these days, a big saw will easily pay for itself after a while.

I like the cherry btw.
 

alex robinson

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Yes they are expensive, but judging by the price of timber these days, a big saw will easily pay for itself after a while.

I like the cherry btw.

I really wish I could justify one, but it is only a hobby. Living in a suburban terrace I am already pushing my luck with the smaller stuff I am trying to store. Do you have one? Any pics in action?
That chest you posted earlier is amazing!
 

Adam W.

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I really wish I could justify one, but it is only a hobby. Living in a suburban terrace I am already pushing my luck with the smaller stuff I am trying to store. Do you have one? Any pics in action?
That chest you posted earlier is amazing!
Thanks. I'll be milling some oak up today and post a couple of pictures later.
 

Adam W.

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@alex robinson

The saw is playing up and I think the carb needs a clean out, but managed a bit of tidying up before it got bad.
It's an 880 with a 26" bar and .404 ripping chain.

IMG_5472.JPG


I rigged up a water cooling feed with the hose for the bar as it gets really hot and this had made it much better. It runs on a Logosol M7 bed which I've been using for about 17 years now and it has milled over 70 tonnes, which means it's paid for itself many times over.

IMG_5474.JPG


The ridges on the surface are from stop starting, as the saw kept conking out. I think it's a fuel issue and should be easy enough to sort out, but I got a couple of beams and some nice braces cut this morning.

IMG_5476.JPG


And I'm milling up some of the firewood for timber framing, which I'll use to build a double garage with to get some of the shiz in the garden tidied up.

IMG_5459.JPG


Once the saw is going again, I'll sort this stuff out and then get another load for milling boards and stuff for carving.

I'll straddle the bed with the gantry, so that I can just dump the stems on it without lifting them. Hopefully I'll get an electric feed head next year, as it's a lot quieter and easier to start.

Edit:

Fixed the saw, it was a dirty fuel filter slowing down the flow to the carb.
 
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alex robinson

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@alex robinson

The saw is playing up and I think the carb needs a clean out, but managed a bit of tidying up before it got bad.
It's an 880 with a 26" bar and .404 ripping chain.

View attachment 134949

I rigged up a water cooling feed with the hose for the bar as it gets really hot and this had made it much better. It runs on a Logosol M7 bed which I've been using for about 17 years now and it has milled over 70 tonnes, which means it's paid for itself many times over.

View attachment 134950

The ridges on the surface are from stop starting, as the saw kept conking out. I think it's a fuel issue and should be easy enough to sort out, but I got a couple of beams and some nice braces cut this morning.

View attachment 134951

And I'm milling up some of the firewood for timber framing, which I'll use to build a double garage with to get some of the shiz in the garden tidied up.

View attachment 134952

Once the saw is going again, I'll sort this stuff out and then get another load for milling boards and stuff for carving.

I'll straddle the bed with the gantry, so that I can just dump the stems on it without lifting them. Hopefully I'll get an electric feed head next year, as it's a lot quieter and easier to start.

Bet that is a lot faster! How long does it take per board?
 

Adam W.

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When the saw is running properly, I can cut the slab off and halve it for those braces in about 5 minutes, so it's about a minute per 5' x 24" cut. Green oak is no match for that saw, it's a proper beast and I'm glad it's strapped down.

The mill gets treated bad and it lives out amongst the rocks and nettles, but it's a trusty thing if you can handle the logs.
I need to do some maintenance on it with some new pulleys and I was thinking of getting the bar top steering for it too for accurate boards. Once the saw is done and the bed is sorted it'll run lovely for years. The newer F2+ version that logosol have looks the dogs and they also have some great wide slab milling gear that will fit in a car.
 

isaac3d

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Today I cut up a couple of eucalyptus logs that have been sitting around in the garden for a few months. I had painted the ends with some concrete sealer/primer (its what I had at the time!). It has largely stopped bad end splitting but there has been quite some discolouration which I assume is due to fungal attack. I don't know if you could call it spalting but the colour variation looks quite interesting. The pieces shown below are a little over 2 foot long, 6 to 8 inches wide and 1.5 inch thick. The white goo on some of the ends is freshly applied wax end sealer (honest guv!).
I still have a few more logs to mill up tomorrow.

eucalyptus.jpg

In a year or two, I will doubtless be cursing the knots when trying to plane the stuff, but they do look pretty.
 
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