Laminate under a curved bath?

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stuart.grimshaw

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I'm trying to work out what the best plan of action is to lay a laminate floor in our bathroom. The bath is curved rather than straight so I don't fancy scribing the whole width of the bathroom across multiple boards. I was just going to lay the boards long and put the curved plastic back on top.

The thing I'm worried about is that while the carpet that's down now will compress under the bath side, laminate won't & I'm concerned that the underlay & laminate might make the gap too small to fit the curved panel back in.

How have others handled this?
 
I'm trying to work out what the best plan of action is to lay a laminate floor in our bathroom. The bath is curved rather than straight so I don't fancy scribing the whole width of the bathroom across multiple boards. I was just going to lay the boards long and put the curved plastic back on top.

The thing I'm worried about is that while the carpet that's down now will compress under the bath side, laminate won't & I'm concerned that the underlay & laminate might make the gap too small to fit the curved panel back in.

How have others handled this?
Bath panels are generally extremely flimsy and will generally cope with quite a lot of distortion - but if it has a thin edge at the base then you could trim it carefully with a fine toothed saw - very carefully as the plastic cracks easily.
 
The bath will have adjustable feet so can be raised and leveled if needed though you may have to remove then redo silicone, there will be enough slack in the plumbing to allow for small movements. I would remove the panel, lay boards to run under and then see if there's a problem refitting , you may get lucky.
 
Make yourself a new bath panel to replace the plastic one, I had a similar issue with a shower tray where the supplied undertrim was not only plastic tack it was 15mm to high because I fitted the shower tray and then leveled the bathroom floor ready for tiling. I then painted it the same color as the wall paneling and it looks so much better than it would have in white plastic.
 
Make yourself a new bath panel to replace the plastic one, I had a similar issue with a shower tray where the supplied undertrim was not only plastic tack it was 15mm to high because I fitted the shower tray and then leveled the bathroom floor ready for tiling. I then painted it the same color as the wall paneling and it looks so much better than it would have in white plastic.
That had crossed my mind, the main complication is the colour of the bath, it'd be hard to match in plastic and I wouldn't fancy trying to make it out of wood.

I'm going to see if it fits anyway, the bath is hopefully adjustable as a last resort.
 
Bathrooms, probably the worst room to refit in a house because even little jobs escalate and you seem to hit snag after snag. The issue many find is with drainage, getting the fall right on shower and bath waste and issues with the soil pipe, these caused me big headaches all instigated by the bodges and short cuts taken by the original builders.
 
Yep, what was supposed to be a simple re-grout, silicone, paint & floor is starting to balloon. While I was scraping & prepping to re-do the silicone, one of the tiles started to come off the wall, and it's soaking wet underneath. Obviously been leaking for a long time, trying to let it dry before I assess the damage.
 
Have just done my bathroom the bath panel normally comes in two pieces. The lower part is like a plinth and adjustable . With your wet tiles if you can put a dehumidifier in your bathroom for a week it will speed up the drying process (Ebac dehumidifiers are British made) humidity stats are very cheap now. Hope that helps you.
 
That had crossed my mind, the main complication is the colour of the bath, it'd be hard to match in plastic and I wouldn't fancy trying to make it out of wood.

I'm going to see if it fits anyway, the bath is hopefully adjustable as a last resort.
Google Vinylkote if you can send them a sample they will match the colour. It actually dyes the plastic so will not wear off like paint. Use it in car restorations to recolour plastic components, works really well.
 
I'm trying to work out what the best plan of action is to lay a laminate floor in our bathroom. The bath is curved rather than straight so I don't fancy scribing the whole width of the bathroom across multiple boards. I was just going to lay the boards long and put the curved plastic back on top.

The thing I'm worried about is that while the carpet that's down now will compress under the bath side, laminate won't & I'm concerned that the underlay & laminate might make the gap too small to fit the curved panel back in.

How have others handled this?
Had the same issue and just trimmed the bottom of the panel with a "Dremel"
 
I am sure that a lot of issues today with leaking shower cubicles is because people don't make a substantial shower tray base and use those stick on plastic legs. Once it moves then your problems start and it is even worse if your floor is just MDF.
 
I'm trying to work out what the best plan of action is to lay a laminate floor in our bathroom. The bath is curved rather than straight so I don't fancy scribing the whole width of the bathroom across multiple boards. I was just going to lay the boards long and put the curved plastic back on top.

The thing I'm worried about is that while the carpet that's down now will compress under the bath side, laminate won't & I'm concerned that the underlay & laminate might make the gap too small to fit the curved panel back in.

How have others handled this?
Thinking a little out of the box especially if cost is a issue why not consider a vinyl floor, this would not only be a lot easier to do it will be cheaper as I assume at some point you will update the bathroom. I personally wouldn’t spend time and money on as you say ‘a lick of paint ‘ only to rip it out at some point in the future . Also imo laminate flooring in bathrooms never seams to last as even when sealed water and moisture will find its way into cut ends or joints . You can then sit back and plan your dream bathroom and as others have mentioned-avoid all the bodges and temporary/permanent fixes that previous builders or owners have carried out . Ps when you do update your bathroom you can then put your hard earned cash into what you actually want and not what you are prepared to put up with . Soz for late reply and hope it’s of some use .
 
Def don’t use laminate
even the water resistant is just not that good
go bingo man's route
for what save u can buy the vynal and get a pro to fit it
its really quite cheap
 
Being quite good at multiple trades fitted this recently after removing 3 layers of previous layers of vinyl and sealing the concrete floor before hand I laid these floors in a womens refuge shelter
 

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