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Juniper tree?

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KevM

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Hi all,

I've got what I believe is a Juniper tree in my back garden. Long story short, it's going to be coming down.

a) Do we think it's a Juniper?
b) Is there anything worthwhile to be done with Juniper wood (other than burning...)
c) If there's anything to be done with it - what's the best way to prepare it?

Thanks for any advice!


 

heronviewer

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A juniper is a bush and doesn't grow more than about six feet high. From the shape and height it looks more like a pine, but hard to tell from your photo.
 

Glynne

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Couldn’t say whether it’s a Juniper tree or not, but you can turn Juniper so that may be a possibility.
 

sunnybob

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copied from wiki.......

Junipers vary in size and shape from tall trees, 20–40 m (66–131 ft) tall, to columnar or low-spreading shrubs with long, trailing branches. They are evergreen with needle-like and/or scale-like leaves. They can be either monoecious or dioecious. The female seed cones are very distinctive, with fleshy, fruit-like coalescing scales which fuse together to form a "berry"-like structure, 4–27 mm (0.16–1.06 in) long, with one to 12 unwinged, hard-shelled seeds. In some species, these "berries" are red-brown or orange, but in most they are blue; they are often aromatic and can be used as a spice. The seed maturation time varies between species from 6 to 18 months after pollination. The male cones are similar to those of other Cupressaceae, with six to 20 scales.
 

Suffolkboy

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Could you get a couple of better photos please?

one showing the bark on the main stem, another showing the needles and if possible any cones/fruit?
 

KevM

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Hi Suffolk Boy,

Here's a few more photos - no sign of any berries/cones.





 

Trainee neophyte

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Dare I ask where you are? Looks like a variety of Mediterranean pine to me - not the pine nut variety (i.e. stone pine) but something similar.

The berries on juniper are very aromatic, and quite obvious - usually cover the plant. Here is a good example: https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=xDFZflAfhy0

I say plank it up and see what happens - the worst outcome is some straight-sided firewood. If it is a fast-growing warm-climate species, then it will be pretty soft and light, but not unusable, I would think. If it a fast-growing warm climate species, but growing in Aberdeen, you may find it more close-grained than usual.
 

Suffolkboy

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Orraloon

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You did not say what you intend to make from it or how you will mill it. If it's for turning then its pretty easy. Chainsaw it into short lengths and seal the ends for drying as soon after cutting as possible. After that as time allows saw out the center part with the heart as thats where cracks usually start from. The 2 almost half logs are now turning blanks. If you want planks then you either need a chainsaw mill (best option) or a decent sized bandsaw. I will stress again the importance of sealing the end grain as soon after cutting as you can.
Can't say if it's a cypress or juniper as there are so many of each but the wood should be usable either way.
Regards
John
 

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Forget I said anything about it being pine - I zoomed in on the needles, and they aren't. Much more like a juniper. I still think you should have a go - nothing ventured, nothing gained etc.
 

KevM

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Thanks all for feedback. The deed is now done. A fun weekend with a stump grinder to remove the last of the evidence and it will be like it was never there. I salvaged a couple of decent straight sections. I suspect it may end up in the burner simply due to time pressures, but I'll deal the ends in case I get the opportunity to process it.
Cheers
 

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KevM":2sqb4mzi said:
Thanks all for feedback. The deed is now done. A fun weekend with a stump grinder to remove the last of the evidence and it will be like it was never there. I salvaged a couple of decent straight sections. I suspect it may end up in the burner simply due to time pressures, but I'll deal the ends in case I get the opportunity to process it.
Cheers
About the stump: if you happen to own a stump grinder, then go for it, but otherwise, try burning it out? Cut a deep cross into the face with a chainsaw, pour in a mix of diesel/petrol (4:1, i.e. mostly diesel), wait a while, and then light blue touch paper. Even easier, drill many holes with a spade bit, pour in fertilizer, and wait. In a year it will have composted (allegedly - I have never tried that one, but youtube assures me it will work).

We have lots of cypress wood available here, and it spits explosively in fire - don't know if your mystery juniper might do the same.
 
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