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JET JWBS16 band saw

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devonwoody

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Does anyone know if goodwoodworking did a review on this bandsaw

JET jwbs16.


Also my electrics into the garage has a 30amp fuse and from this single box I have a 13amp ringmain operating.
Do you know if in the past (not present regulations ) I could have run a
20amp line out of this box for the above saw.
 

Mdotflorida

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devonwoody":3pzmagul said:
Does anyone know if goodwoodworking did a review on this bandsaw

JET jwbs16.


Also my electrics into the garage has a 30amp fuse and from this single box I have a 13amp ringmain operating.
Do you know if in the past (not present regulations ) I could have run a
20amp line out of this box for the above saw.
Hi DW

I have the Jet 18" version. Came with and works off a standard 3 pin 13A plug. Never blown a fuse.

Jeff
 

Noel

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Dev, list is £1049 so I reckon there's a bit more in it. I'd aim for £900 or so.

Noel
 

MikeW

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Hi DW, I've had the JWBS-18 for a few years now.

It has been a decent saw. My only gripe about the saw has been the undersized trunnions. Any weight on the outside of the table and it will move off plane.

This isn't often a problem and probably falls more into the "I wish it didn't" category.

I often use a 1" carbide blade for resawing exotics and it handles it just fine. My understanding is the JWBS-16 uses the same motor (at least when I bought mine) so power shouldn't be too much an issue. I also have never blown a breaker. (Which probably doesn't mean much in relation to use there.)

Dust collection is adequate to good. The roller guides work really well. On a mobile base like mine, one can move it around easily enough.

All said, it is a machine I'll never sell even if I get a better/larger saw.
 

devonwoody

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Thanks Mikew;
does that mean I should consider propping up the outside edge of the table with a prop on heavy jobs?
Over here they are recommending 20amp wiring which as far as domestic wiring goes, is a bit over the top.
Can any electrician tell me the adverse side of running this machine through a 13amp fuse as far as machine speed and power is concerned.
One member has already stated he runs his machine as such.
 

MikeW

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devonwoody":3qhnae6d said:
Thanks Mikew;
does that mean I should consider propping up the outside edge of the table with a prop on heavy jobs?
...
Hi DW,

I think I would advise being aware of it. It isn't that the trunnions slip, they don't as long as they are tightened down well. But it does flex the assembly.

I have often thought about adding a brace. I guess I don't because I'm lazy. Most of the heavy planks I just try to cut with the bulk of the timber on the left of the blade, which solves the problem.

It occurs under a few cutting conditions I do.

First, when I am cutting small log sections it is very noticable as the log section is to the right of the blade. However, cutting perfectly square isn't too big of a deal.

Second, is when I am resawing a large slab of wood and I am cutting several veneers from the same piece. This means the fence is to the left of the blade (away from the blade the thickness of the desired veneer) and the slab to the right of the blade.

Third, is if I have a 2" x 12" or wider plank and I am cutting several strips off the same width. Again the plank is to the right and the fence to the left. That can put a lot of weight on the right side of the table.

I usually find other ways to compensate if it is critical, such as using roller stands to support the wood.
 
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