It's hard to believe, but stanley still makes a #7

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D_W

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I feel almost obligated to get one and put it through its paces, especially in regard to whether or not it's flat and twist free and how it adjusts.

I've found no issues with the more recent stanley irons. There's something a little weird about the steel in them, but it doesn't really affect use of them.

As i was checking an amazon order, amazon suggested that I should buy a #7 stanley, which apparently comes from the UK for $104 including shipping in about two weeks.

No worries with cites - the handles look like they're probably plastic even though the listing doesn't make it obvious.

I know from prior experience, you guys will not be able to see amazon listings properly because amazon isn't a fan of that, but the model number is

1-12-007​


Almost looks like a date.

From what i've seen of at least four recent stanleys over the last 10 years, the irons are definitely better than the round top irons made in the 70s (i've rehardened those - they just don't have that much upside, even if you reharden and temper them - probably something like 0.6% carbon steel).

Inflation adjusted, the "new" one is about 40% of the two metal jointers that I have (low use I. Sorby #7 and a low-use earlier Record #8).
 
I feel almost obligated to get one and put it through its paces, especially in regard to whether or not it's flat and twist free and how it adjusts.

I've found no issues with the more recent stanley irons. There's something a little weird about the steel in them, but it doesn't really affect use of them.

As i was checking an amazon order, amazon suggested that I should buy a #7 stanley, which apparently comes from the UK for $104 including shipping in about two weeks.

No worries with cites - the handles look like they're probably plastic even though the listing doesn't make it obvious.

I know from prior experience, you guys will not be able to see amazon listings properly because amazon isn't a fan of that, but the model number is

1-12-007​


Almost looks like a date.

From what i've seen of at least four recent stanleys over the last 10 years, the irons are definitely better than the round top irons made in the 70s (i've rehardened those - they just don't have that much upside, even if you reharden and temper them - probably something like 0.6% carbon steel).

Inflation adjusted, the "new" one is about 40% of the two metal jointers that I have (low use I. Sorby #7 and a low-use earlier Record #8).

Comes up as a 7 here in UK?!🤔🤔🤔
 
you mean the model number?

it's labeled as a 7 here, too. Just noting that if it doesn't, you can search the stanley model designation and probably get 100 hits there.

Not sure where it's made - presumably china or mexico. If amazon global will ship it here in about two weeks for $104 total (maybe it comes surface?) It must be retailing for about $60-$75.

The #4 retails for $43 here at the moment. It's an "OK" plane.
 
I have seen them in a store here for (I think) 129 euro.

The reviews for them aren't very good. From being surprised to get plastic handles, to broken handles in the box or shipping that leaves the plane in parts in the box floating around and broken.

I think I will have the sense to resist buying something I don't really need and would just resell tarted up for about what I paid or a little less.

I tarted up a 4 - it's just OK like mentioned above, but it's functional. Giant mouth, which isn't fatal for a double iron plane, but it's not nice on smoothers and jointers where a lazy start can catch the edge of a board and pry it up. Crappy cap iron with weird shape. Other than that, not as bad as expected. I'd rather locate a nice T20 #7, but admit I haven't done that, either.
 
Don't, David! Or do, it's your call. The hollow plastic handles are an abomination. The casings look like they were finished by dragging them behind a car.

You'll get it to sing, no question. But you've got nice vintage ones from these shores. I don't understand why Stanley won't do it properly!
 
Don't, David! Or do, it's your call. The hollow plastic handles are an abomination. The casings look like they were finished by dragging them behind a car.

You'll get it to sing, no question. But you've got nice vintage ones from these shores. I don't understand why Stanley won't do it properly!

well, wholesaling an entire plane for what is probably $50 has something to do with it.

I found one of the amazon complaints humorous. At $104 with shipping, it "should have been 1/3rd the cost".

There'd have to be something very wrong with it for me not to be able to make it "really right".

I don't mind the plastic handles so much - they aren't a sensory hallelujah, but the shape is decent and they could be remade out of just about anything.

The only reason I'd pick it up, I guess is just out of curiosity, and maybe as a ruse - but a ruse just doesn't go as far for me as it used to with kids getting older and many strings pulling from different directions.

You're right about the castings, too - they're actually pretty good quality in terms of hardness, but the grinding wheel that they use must be something unbelievably coarse. like 12 grit or a super heavy cut with 24. you could drag things across the casting perpendicularly to do rough sanding.
 
There's one listing for a #3 plane, part number 1-12-003.

At $136 not that attractive. I'm curious if it could be made to work like the #4 offering. $40 wasn't too bad to cough up for the #4 to check it out.
 
the number 7 is €132 delivered here.......Greek stock.....
how can they make em that cheap.....
"cheese Gromit"
I have a really old one in store somewhere......lol....
 
I think the correct spelling is "Stanley" between quotes, because there is a world of difference between those and even the not great late UK ones.
I have a #4 from the last UK made series and one from China, and the UK one is not great, but the China made one is pretty bad, the castings are very very rough, hardly ground flat at all.
So yeah, they can make it for little money, because casting iron is not that expensive (shipping heavy parts is). Maybe 12GBP of material cost, another 15 or so labour and processing? They'll probably need some margin because of the machinery (and you better hope for humanity these castings aren't made in some fareaway shop under bad labour conditions, because simple processes like that sometimes are).
 
Oh, what the he'll. I'll buy it and find out anyway, and then take the challenge to make $5 profit on it as a ruse.
 
This is what you want to try out not s plane with a plastic handle !!!!!!
 

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I think Veritas is the gold standard when it comes to companies doing proper engineering to come up with innovative new products at reasonable cost.
Lie-Nielsen makes nice stuff and Clifton too, but come on, break free from the mould and do something new for a change. Modern manufacturing can be so precise without added cost, we have so much better process control and control over material properties, obviously engineering tradeoffs still need to be made, but even then.

With that in mind, it really should be feasible for a factory in China to make excellent handplanes, but somehow, it seems that 300 years of engineering knowledge has been forgotten, they drop the ball so often (also on the other cheap #4's on Amazon and elsewhere). It shouldn't be necessary, making a handplane is not rocket science.
 
I think Veritas is the gold standard when it comes to companies doing proper engineering to come up with innovative new products at reasonable cost.
Lie-Nielsen makes nice stuff and Clifton too, but come on, break free from the mould and do something new for a change. Modern manufacturing can be so precise without added cost, we have so much better process control and control over material properties, obviously engineering tradeoffs still need to be made, but even then.

With that in mind, it really should be feasible for a factory in China to make excellent handplanes, but somehow, it seems that 300 years of engineering knowledge has been forgotten, they drop the ball so often (also on the other cheap #4's on Amazon and elsewhere). It shouldn't be necessary, making a handplane is not rocket science.
I would have thought they'd be having a crack at this by now
https://www.ukworkshop.co.uk/threads/goldenberg-smoother.82202/
 
This is what you want to try out not s plane with a plastic handle !!!!!!

I tried out one of the pre-production LV custom planes (it was after the design was finalized). I appreciated the opportunity to try it at the time, but would prefer any stanley type to it.

If you asked me about the MIC china smoother vs. an LV custom plane, I would say "I'll find a later USA made stanley somewhere and take neither of those".

The one I tried out was fore plane size. I don't remember if the mouth is physically back further in the plane, but remember that it didn't have the same "on the end of the hand" feel as a stanley does, and that's what I didn't like about it. Didn't care for the cap iron design, either - as received, mine "climbed toward the edge" when tightened and the need for the hex wrench was a liability.

It was a solidly made plane, just not for me. I wished they'd have just made a high quality copy of a stanley bailey plane - I think they'd sell a lot more of those.
 
This is what you want to try out not s plane with a plastic handle !!!!!!
Or extreme engineering . I just received the small plane they make. I love it . Fits in my pocket at work.
 

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Or extreme engineering . I just received the small plane they make. I love it . Fits in my pocket at work.

whatever love people may have for the various newly introduced designs, I have like...fundamental attachment to the English try plane, jack plane and the stanley bailey design.

But that love comes from working wood from rough to finished by hand. It's hard to explain. I get why people like the newer designs, especially if planes are more of a fitting and finishing tool.

The same kind of love for the fundamental designs, or attachment to them - I don't pet them instead of the kitty in the evening or anything like that - but that same thing sent me back to realizing that the small grain lower-wear life irons are better for an experienced user than the V11s, etc.

I am such a perv that I don't make that statement just out of use, but I've gone so far as to make a whole bunch of different irons, too. Just out of curiosity - all the way to buying XHP stock (V11's commercial open market equivalent) and testing them out. In the end, I just find the stuff that was made for pros before cost cuts started works for people who are on par with a pro. A little better. And for some reason, Stanley's bailey design is so good that it's pretty much unbeatable until they went really far with the cost cuts.
 
I have ordered the plane. This dippy exercise may be documented. We shall see. But it won't be documented on youtube in one of those "I open a stanley jointer from England and show you how to set it up, so you can buy one, too and I can get a commission or more viewers".

The chance is almost below zero that the plastic handled plane could unseat my record or sorby jointers or any T10-T20 stanley jointer, for that matter.
 
I don't mind the plastic handles that much, at least they're likely the right shape.
Two near or identical planes, but one is nicer as the tote is more forward leaning,
which is most noticeable when held single handed, as it seems lighter being ever so much closer to the toe.
SAM_2351.JPG
 
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