How to enthuse a 4 year old

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DavidRa

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Gerrards Cross
Walking through my garage workshop my grandson stopped at the vice and said what’s this, so we put some wood in it and cut it up. Would love to kindle the spark , anyone got examples of what worked and at what age?
 
Does his dad not do anything hands on like woodwork, diy or something ? At a young age I liked taking anything apart from Tv's to old carburretors and read mainly non-fiction. But back then there were many more parents working in those types of jobs so kids were surrounded by capable hands on dads.
 
Walking through my garage workshop my grandson stopped at the vice and said what’s this, so we put some wood in it and cut it up. Would love to kindle the spark , anyone got examples of what worked and at what age?
My adult daughters gained practical skills, but not a hobby enthusiasm. They always had access to tools, support and stuff, and they saw me doing stuff, from DIY to cooking to sewing, and with my partner, gardening and animal care. So they both have tools and can do stuff, but only do so out of necessity. Ironically grandson, with toy drill, declared he was 'just like daddy', when the only drill in the household is owned and used by mummy! Ah, don't you love social conditioning.
 
My twin daughters will be 2 this August. The toys that me and SWMBO buy (mostly second hand) are always something "crafty" like soft building blocks or puzzles, or a set of wooden tools. When I cook for them I make a point to show them how I am doing stuff, like cracking an egg in front of them and show what is inside and how that becomes food, and trying to make the connection with the "egg" they saw in the books.
Even at this very young age it is thrilling to look at them and see them trying to understand how things work, how things are connected. I hope that by seeing me making and building stuff at home they will grow up finding it a natural thing to do. Lead by example, as they say. Much of the basic skills that I have I learned as a child/teenager doing stuff with and for my father.

I know we can't force them and they will have their own personality, but we do everything that we can to try to foster curiosity and an inquisitive mind.
 
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Instant gratification is the answer... my 9 & 6 year old barely have any patience so a 4 year old...

When I finish my workshop ( :ROFLMAO: 2 years this month - argh), my plan is to involve them in some meaningful tasks near the end result. e.g. a bird box -have the parts already cut and have them help with assembly - done in 10 minutes and can have it hanging up, obviously can report on progress later etc

Another idea I have is help build a blackboard for Dad's workshop... again, have parts pre-cut, quick assemble... ok now you can help paint the blackboard paint on..when it's dried later on you can draw on it

So, little + often with instant gratification for the young'uns I say
 
Most younger people have little or no appetite for anything that involves tools a few such as your grandson are curious enough to ask that question “ What is that used for or similar have the ability to get into a hobby if they stimulated by the thought of using tools to make something .
 
4 years is a bit young to have decent fine motor skills. When there writing improves this shows there ready(if there interested of course) I did a bug hotel with a little girl and little boy. They were to young to knock the nails in!
 
I agree with above, 4 years is a bit too young, but I learnt to hold the solder iron when I was 7 when my dad was soldering for his model train. And I was interested. Just take him with you into your workshop and show him what you do and soon you will see if it gets too boring for him
 
Never too young. Had mine (both flavours) helping with using safe tools at that age.
Mine were into a toy that was a gold ball size spheres so we made a simple stand for them (I cut a strip of oak worktop - they helped measure, mark and drill a line of round holes to sit the spheres in, then rubbed in some BLO)

Never too young and the younger you do it, the more it’s normalised.


And to the earlier poster. Shock horror, some mums also have practical skills/do DIY etc.
I know. The modern world eh? 😀
 
Never too young. Had mine (both flavours) helping with using safe tools at that age.
Mine were into a toy that was a range of golf ball-sized spheres so we made a simple stand for them (I cut a strip of oak worktop - they helped measure, mark and drill a line of round holes to sit the spheres in, then rubbed in some BLO)

Never too young and the younger you do it, the more it’s normalised.


And to the earlier poster. Shock horror, some mums also have practical skills/do DIY etc.
I know. The modern world eh? 😀
Oops. Double post.
 
My adult daughters gained practical skills, but not a hobby enthusiasm. They always had access to tools, support and stuff, and they saw me doing stuff, from DIY to cooking to sewing, and with my partner, gardening and animal care. So they both have tools and can do stuff, but only do so out of necessity. Ironically grandson, with toy drill, declared he was 'just like daddy', when the only drill in the household is owned and used by mummy! Ah, don't you love social conditioning.
As the parent of four daughters, all who can use a drill and know what a rawl plug is, I can really appreciate this.

@DavidRa mine all received a toolbox with a whisk drill (enclosed for finger safety) a hammer, a small saw, a pair of pliers, screw driver and a tape measure when they were four or five. They came as gifts from Santa. They loved getting a bit of wood drilling holes hammering in nails, putting in screws. They still have the tool boxes today and all of them have expanded there tool kits for the odd jobs around there homes
 
When I was that age, we had toys called "wooden blocks".
You could build anything you wanted out of them, the only limit was your imagination.
Them came the Erector Set (Meccano) and then Lego
 
I can't say why but when I read the thread title I wondered why anyone would want to soak a kid in herbs and flowers? Then I realized it didn't say infused. 🙄

My buddy gave each of his kids their own little tool box with a hammer, some screwdrivers, glue, pencils, tape measure and colouring pencils and crayons among the things. He gave them a box of scrap pieces of wood to work with. They also each had safety glasses that they had to wear at all times when in the shop. They also had their own ear protectors that they had to wear if he did something noisy. They would go hog wild making and decorating their projects and he would make whatever cuts they needed. When they got bored they put away their tools and went in the house until they wanted to come back to "work" some more. Give them the chance to discover and they will take it as far as they like.

Pete
 
I can't say why but when I read the thread title I wondered why anyone would want to soak a kid in herbs and flowers? Then I realized it didn't say infused. 🙄

My buddy gave each of his kids their own little tool box with a hammer, some screwdrivers, glue, pencils, tape measure and colouring pencils and crayons among the things. He gave them a box of scrap pieces of wood to work with. They also each had safety glasses that they had to wear at all times when in the shop. They also had their own ear protectors that they had to wear if he did something noisy. They would go hog wild making and decorating their projects and he would make whatever cuts they needed. When they got bored they put away their tools and went in the house until they wanted to come back to "work" some more. Give them the chance to discover and they will take it as far as they like.

Pete
I forgot the safety glasses. My kids had them in their tool boxes too.
 
Walking through my garage workshop my grandson stopped at the vice and said what’s this, so we put some wood in it and cut it up. Would love to kindle the spark , anyone got examples of what worked and at what age?
I've often found that kids of all ages, but especially teenagers, will usually enthusiastically, and often furtively or secretively, pursue activities that their parents, guardians, teachers, etc, try to prevent or discourage. That approach may be worth exploring. Slainte.

PS. There may, or may not have been a tongue in my cheek when writing the above.
 
Making bows and arrows with my dad worked for me! In the late 50s cowboys and Indians were in and boys had cap guns. At the house we lived in till I was seven I could find suitable branches nearby to work with, and as a seven year old could make ones that could shoot over the house into the back garden on my own. I had my own tools then!
 
We had an old school Woodward, the sort that was surrounded by houses. These guys never kept a tidy place and had a huge pile of scraps outside the workshop. The best were rippings of tongues that looked just like arrows! We soon found out that pine was brittle for a bow and used branches. Cricket bats were easy to make as well. Interestingly a guy that worked at the Woodyard was still a joiner until he retired about 2010 working for another Woodyard in the town next door(the original having shut in the eighties) must have been young!
 
My 5 year old grandson loves joining me in the shed, so many questions though :) He does a lot of stuff at home with his dad, he helps with the gardening etc. I've only let him use a file on a bit of scrap wood so far.

20230725_114503.jpg
 
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