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Help with wooden jointer plane

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Anonymous

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Hi all,

Perhaps a stupid question this, but here goes..

I have had some difficulty in using this plane. I'm attempting to use my fingernails as a fence against the face of a board, (as one would with a metal plane), but the plane wobbles about when trying to plane the edge.

Anyone know what the correct grip is?

Thanks for you help!

Gordon :?
 

Philly

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Gordon
How thick is the timber your planing? Narrow stock is difficult to edge plane-maybe a shooting board would help?
Hope this helps,
Philly :D
 

Alf

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gogser":1mpqto22 said:
Anyone know what the correct grip is?
Something like this I believe:

Click on thumbnail for larger image

But I doubt that's really the trouble. As Philly says, if the edge is narrow then you might be better off using a shooting board. Also the wobble may be no different from what you get with a metal plane, it's just the high profile of the woodie exaggerates the effect. In the same way though, any wobble you introduce at the top will be magnified at the sole. Personally I've never quite acquired the knack of jointing with wooden planes, but my hands are a little stretched by the wooden stock. You could clamp a simple fence to your jointer and joint your boards that way, which should help. On the whole though, I have a feeling it might just be a matter of practice. :roll:

Cheers, Alf
 
A

Anonymous

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Thanks for your help folks, the stock I was attempting to edge joint was only 14mm thick so the shooting board is probably the best solution.

Also thanks very much to Alf for the picture, that is the grip I was using when planing.

Is there anything you guys don't know?

Cheers,

Gordon :D
 
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Anonymous

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gogser":1s6y3j7k said:
Is there anything you guys don't know?
Absolutely! Of couse we don't know what those things are. :lol:

If you are intending to join those edges, clamp the two pieces together and plane them at the same time (match planing). You will get more stability and the edges won't have to be a perfect 90º.
 

Alf

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Roger Nixon":v3icg3ka said:
If you are intending to join those edges, clamp the two pieces together and plane them at the same time (match planing). You will get more stability and the edges won't have to be a perfect 90º.
As long as your jointer blade isn't cambered...

Cheers, Alf
 
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Anonymous

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Alf":3p0rdp15 said:
Roger Nixon":3p0rdp15 said:
If you are intending to join those edges, clamp the two pieces together and plane them at the same time (match planing). You will get more stability and the edges won't have to be a perfect 90º.
As long as your jointer blade isn't cambered...

Cheers, Alf
If the blade is cambered, it isn't a jointer. It's a try plane. :twisted:

Just teasin', dear ALF.
 

Alf

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Aaargh. Don't get me started on that nonsense. I don't have a try plane. I have a jointer plane. It's blade is cambered. That's how I joint an edge. Anyone wanting to discuss this better step outside... :p :wink:

Cheers, Alf
 
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Anonymous

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Alf":7eyrxcmf said:
Aaargh. Don't get me started on that nonsense. I don't have a try plane. I have a jointer plane. It's blade is cambered. That's how I joint an edge. Anyone wanting to discuss this better step outside... :p :wink:

Cheers, Alf
Don't make me bring Adam Cherubini over here! :lol:
 

Argus

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Four things that will affect the control of a wooden jointer - or any wooden bench plane for that matter:

1. Uneven sole – they need to be flat and kept flat as they wear quicker than metal. Wear on the sole on either side of the throat will affect the cut and control
2. Square and straight cutting edge.
3. Absolutely sharp – I finish mine with a strop.
4. Finally, try using an oil wick. There is considerably more friction with dry wood on dry wood than with a metal sole.

Finally adjust for the thinnest cut you can get. If you get it right they are a joy to use.

Hope this helps
 

Argus

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Alf":bzvvhueq said:
Argus":bzvvhueq said:
2. Square and straight cutting edge.
Ho hum...

Cheers, Alf

Yes, square and flat for edge jointing, in my opinion.

I use them for rub joints that demand a flat uniform contact along the length with equal distribution of glue. (smelly organic glue, that is). Rounded or convex blades to my way of thinking will give a weaker union and demand extra pressure with clamps to compress the side fibres – defeats the objective.

However, on the No 7 type that I use for flatting boards, the edges of the iron are slightly relieved, because I don’t want tram-lines - but that's a different plane for a different purpose.

In the days before I had a thicknesser, I prepared sawn boards the hard way and used a wooden fore plane that I adapted by rounding the sole slightly longitudinally and gave a pronounced round to the iron to match. This went across the joined planks diagonally. Years later I found that I had re-invented a scrub plane!

Diff’rent strokes….. you use what works well for you.

Cheers and do enjoy your router.
 

Argus

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Looking back at Gogser’s original question, wobble on a narrow board is quite likely. It’s best to shoot it lying down or increase it’s width with extra boards clamped or tacked with glue to get more stability.

One thing you may experiment with (and don’t scoff’ because it does work) is the Japanese approach.
PULL the plane toward you instead of pushing. It takes a little getting used to, strange at first. It’s surprising how much control you have.
 

Alf

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Argus":3j4f0ywr said:
Diff’rent strokes….. you use what works well for you.
Okay then, I will. :wink:

Argus":3j4f0ywr said:
Cheers and do enjoy your router.
Ta muchly. For the benefit of the sensitive we'll assume it's a #71 or something...

I agree on the pulling; I think people don't pull planes nearly enough. Although a lot of dating seems to go on... :wink: Not just for control, but it can save a lot of faffing about moving boards round and such too.

Cheers, Alf
 
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