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help please vacuum pump strip down

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hunggaur

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Hi folks sorry back again for advice and help

I may have bagged the barging of the year just got my hands on this vacuum pump for £3.00 which I want to use to make a vacuum bag press. I know I will have to strip it down and service it and I am ok rewiring all the motor.

My questions are as follows

1. is this suitable for a vacuum bag press
2. how do I strip and service the pump
3. the pump has oil in the glass chamber I assume it will have to be drained and refilled (how???)

any other advice would be welcomed

Photos below

many many thanks

jon







 

Chrispy

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I'm only guessing that the oil filled glass chamber is an air filter, to trap any dust entering the pump. :-k
 

Argus

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.


What you have there is a (probably, looking at the photo) an open-drive single stage vacuum pump, dating from at least the 1960's, possibly earlier.

I used Genevacs for years on big chillers and refrigeration gear. As Genevacs go in those days, it is a tiddler.

If it was originally used in the refrigeration industry, it comes from an era when there was unfettered use of all sorts of substances and chemicals that are now banned, so be VERY careful with any oil residues – they may be toxic.

An ultimate Vacuum of 100 Torr is modest by high vacuum standards, but capable of moisture removal (system dehydration) from refrigeration systems, which is what many of these pumps were used for.

The lump on the top is an oil filter on the exhaust tube. When evacuating high volumes of vapours, these pumps could emit an atomised mist of oil and other nasties. The two-stage versions had a gas ballast valve on the intake to reduce all this.


It a relatively small vacuum pump in terms of capacity and size and should suit veneering and the like when it is cleaned out, but be warned:

1 Vacuum pump oil is very expensive stuff.

2 By virtue of the thing being an oiled machine, don’t use it with out a valve between the pump and the work - turning it off without valving down can release all the oil backwards. The same goes for power cuts. Hence the use of oil-less pumps.


Hope this helps.


.
 

hunggaur

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Argus":3rz8dusk said:
.


What you have there is a (probably, looking at the photo) an open-drive single stage vacuum pump, dating from at least the 1960's, possibly earlier.

I used Genevacs for years on big chillers and refrigeration gear. As Genevacs go in those days, it is a tiddler.

If it was originally used in the refrigeration industry, it comes from an era when there was unfettered use of all sorts of substances and chemicals that are now banned, so be VERY careful with any oil residues – they may be toxic.

An ultimate Vacuum of 100 Torr is modest by high vacuum standards, but capable of moisture removal (system dehydration) from refrigeration systems, which is what many of these pumps were used for.

The lump on the top is an oil filter on the exhaust tube. When evacuating high volumes of vapours, these pumps could emit an atomised mist of oil and other nasties. The two-stage versions had a gas ballast valve on the intake to reduce all this.


It a relatively small vacuum pump in terms of capacity and size and should suit veneering and the like when it is cleaned out, but be warned:

1 Vacuum pump oil is very expensive stuff.

2 By virtue of the thing being an oiled machine, don’t use it with out a valve between the pump and the work - turning it off without valving down can release all the oil backwards. The same goes for power cuts. Hence the use of oil-less pumps.


Hope this helps.


.
Hi Argus many thanks for that and i take it all on board do you have any idea how i change the the oil and how much should be put in.

many thanks

jon
 

Argus

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Try to contact Genevac if they are still in business, but many of these older firms were taken over time and again and have lost the details of the older kit……. But you never know.

The Genevacs I used were over 35 years ago and much bigger than yours. Later we switched to Edwards pumps.
I used to use them to provides a high vacuum (100 – 200 Torr when a system was wet down to at least 5 Torr when dry on refrigeration systems) but never stripped them down if I could avoid it.
As a rule, if they needed stripping, they were knackered beyond repair and besides, we were refrigeration engineers, not vac-pump repair men.



1 - Take off the motor and sort that out.
2 - strip everything else off.
3 - At least 2 layers of rubber gloves and take the outside parts off. The only recommendations I can give is play it by ear and don’t get in skin contact with the oil or residues.


.
 

Tony Spear

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Argus":3905nvuz said:
.

I used Genevacs for years on big chillers and refrigeration gear.

Hope this helps.
Are you actually admitting to being a Building Services engineer? :shock:

PS: I agree with all of your comments, although I come at it from a different perspective. :wink:
 

Argus

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[/quote]

Are you actually admitting to being a Building Services engineer? :shock:

PS: I agree with all of your comments, although I come at it from a different perspective. :wink:[/quote]


Not exactly building services.....

I was a refrigeration engineer all my working life though it latterly meant that I worked in what is termed high temperature applications (large water chillers, air conditioning systems and the like) as opposed to low temperature (Chilled - frozen applications). But I've worked on all of it at one time or another - the process and machinery is the same.
Other than air distribution, I never got involved with boilers or other aspects of building services.

As you can see, I'm speaking in the past tense - I'm retired now.



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