Help me with this bit of architecture?

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Trevanion

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What would you call this pointed pattern on the leadwork and the woodwork underneath? I have this knawing feeling that I know the answer but I for the life of me can't think what it is.

eJDF8Zn.jpg


Any help appreciated! :)
 
I don't know, I'm afraid. It looks like christmas bunting. Whatever it is, is most certainly isn't dentils.

"Egg and dart" is usually known as egg and art.
 
It reminds me of an old railway station e.g.
sudbur(jmc_9.1958)old45.jpg


It also makes me think of the decoration on a medieval knight's saddle cloth, or a Persian or maybe Indian building/fabric.

I think it deserves a more interesting name than just 'scalloped'!

Cheers, W2S

PS I've just realised why 'scalloped' means 'scalloped' - they actually were scallops to start with! #-o

https://fineartamerica.com/featured/18t ... known.html

Maybe the best description would be "stylised neoclassical scallop edge motif'? :roll:

Mod edit- image embedding corrected.
 
Woody2Shoes":1cxax7pe said:
It also makes me think of the decoration on a medieval knight's saddle cloth, or a Persian or maybe Indian building/fabric.

I actually thought it looked like the border you’d see on a medieval/crusader tent. I found out that it was called a merlon which is also the pointy up bit you see on crenellated castle walls.

But it’s not a merlon :(

Since you posted that picture of the train station it was obviously used elsewhere, so you’d think there would be a proper name for it. Unless it really is just “Dartless eggs”
 
Trevanion":2wilx3ur said:
What would you call this pointed pattern on the leadwork and the woodwork underneath? I have this knawing feeling that I know the answer but I for the life of me can't think what it is. Any help appreciated!
I think I'd just describe it as scalloped, as in a scalloped frieze in furniture, which can take a variety of forms, e.g., width and length of each scallop, along with arc described at each edge, and how the intersection between scallops are treated, either plain, or as in your example, with a circular cut-out. Slainte.
 
Looks like scalloped is the people's choice then?

At least I've learned a couple of new words (merlon, caparison) - or re-learned (I think I once thought I knew what a caparison was)....
 
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